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Viewing: GN_HON 2111HW ciscojo : The Ancient World - Honors/Writing Intensive

Last approved: Wed, 07 Sep 2016 17:14:42 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 07 Sep 2016 16:36:02 GMT

Proposal Type

Honors
Writing Intensive

Contact Information

ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program
Are you submitting this proposal on behalf of an instructor?

Instructor for whom you are submitting proposal:
ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program
Subject Area’s Department Chair/Director:
ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program

Term for Proposal

Spring 2017
 

Course Catalog Information

PRVST
Honors-General (GN_HON)
Honors-General
2111HW
3
 
30
The Ancient World - Honors/Writing Intensive
The reading list is comprised of the great writers of classical Greece and Rome such as Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Virgil and Apuleius, and of the biblical period, the authors of the Book of Job and the Gospel of Mark.
Humanities
Lecture/Standard
A-F (allow student to choose S/U option)
Honors eligibility required.
 
 
 

Instructor Information

ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program
77777777
(numbers only)
Graduate Teaching Assistant/Graduate Instructor
Conley House
Yes, in the last five years
100

The Campus Writing Program conducts a two-day faculty workshop to assist with the design and implementation of your writing intensive course. Once your course proposal has been approved by the Campus Writing Program, you will receive information on time, date and location of the workshop.
Indicate below if additional instructors are planned, but specific individuals have not yet been chosen. Check all that apply

Briefly describe the qualifications of the known graduate instructors, or planned qualifications if graduate instructors are still to be selected, bearing in mind that graduate students teaching honors courses should be advanced students with a record of excellent teaching.
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Honors Course Information

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1
Answer the questions below as they would apply to one section. For all other sections, provide similar information in the Additional Sections Information box below.
 
Mondays
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Final
 
 
10
 
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Writing Intensive Course Information

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of cultures in the Ancient World that formed the foundations of Western culture. The reading list includes great works of ancient literature and philosophy such as the Homeric epics, tragedies by Sophocles and Euripides, philosophical works of Plato and Aristotle, the Book of Job, Virgil's Aeneid, Stoic and Epicurean texts, Horace's poetry, Paul's Epistle to the Corinthians, and Apuleius's Golden Ass. In addition, students will study the classical art and architecture of Greece and Rome. Students have both a written mid-term exam and written final exam. The written exams make up the remaining 20% portion of the grade. In sum, 100% of the grade is this course is determined through writing.
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Face-to-face
Self paced?

30
20
Should this course be considered for funding?

Large Enrollment Courses:
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Assignments

Pages
All assignments
Students will have a combination of writing assignments in this course in addition to the final project. Students will be able to choose between the following relative to the text: microthemes, explication de texte, and difficulty papers. In the end, however, students must have at least 2 difficulty papers, 2 explications, and 2 microthemes. In other words, students cannot write 6 papers as just microthemes or explications. Microthemes (3-4 Pages Each): The purpose of a microtheme is to help students learn and synthesize important concepts relative to the selected text. The paper is a formal, thesis-driven essay that asks students to respond to an instructor-created prompt. Students will peer review papers before turning in their final drafts. All microthemes follow RAFT format (i.e. Role, Audience, Format, and Task). Explication de Texte (3-4 pages each): The purpose of this assignment is to help students elaborate on a key passage (or even a single sentence) in a given text. Students will be able to choose their own passages or sentences for explication. Students will assess how their selection relates to the text as a whole and/or to a specific theme in the text or the sequence. Students will peer review papers before turning in their final drafts to the instructor. Difficulty Papers (3-4 pages each): Difficulty papers are the opposite of typical academic composition. Instead of focusing on things the student does understand, a difficulty paper asks the student to focus on what he or she does NOT understand. Given the challenging nature of the majority of the texts in this class, this option allows the student to informally discuss his or her difficulties and attempt several possible resolutions. The difficulty papers are informal, but follow a paragraph-format: Identify impressions, ask questions of those impressions or the text, then attempt resolutions. Typically, a student will have a number of different impressions on which to elaborate. To me, difficulty papers represent the epitome of writing-to-learn pedagogy. Given the informal nature and the need to protect a student's sensitivity toward difficult texts, these assignments will not be peer reviewed. Final Project (8-10 page synthesis, or other form of writing): The purpose of the final project is to help students synthesize all of the texts read during the semester. The project is necessarily vague, giving the student the ability to pursue any number of creative expressions. Some students may choose to write a typical final paper that synthesizes the semester's themes. Other students, however, may wish to "write" through art, poetry, music, presentation/performance, or any other form of expression. I will leave this to the student. In order to ensure the student does the required work, each student will conference with me to discuss the final project. Final projects will be revised after instructor feedback. All projects will be the work-equivalent to an 8-10 page paper. Students will also write a number of online responses via Blackboard discussions. These responses will be informal and only graded for participation and thoughtful response.
Length of assignment:
26
 
20
 
46

Total pages for all assignments:
First drafts:
26.00
Revisions:
20.00
46.00
 

Writing Intensive Teaching

Instructor provided feedback
Oral presentation by student, followed by feedback
Peer review
 
 
Multiple interpretations are necessary and encouraged in this course. None of the assignments have a single, correct answer. All written assignments require a student to pursue texts from various angles and interpretive lenses.
Writing is distributed evenly throughout the semester.
80
%
 
0
 

Course Syllabus

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Administrative Information

Humanities and Arts
 
 

Acknowledgement

I have read and reviewed the updated proposal

Additional Comments

TEST -- DELETE
 
Key: 200