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Viewing: GN_HON 3242HW larsens : Interdisciplinary Topics in the Human Sciences: The Nature of Humans - Honors/Writing Intensive

Last approved: Fri, 07 Jul 2017 21:41:34 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 07 Jul 2017 21:41:26 GMT

Proposal Type

Honors
Writing Intensive

Contact Information

larsens
Soren
Larsen
larsens@missouri.edu
573/882-9613
Geography
Are you submitting this proposal on behalf of an instructor?

Instructor for whom you are submitting proposal:
larsens
Soren
Larsen
larsens@missouri.edu
573/882-9613
Geography
Subject Area’s Department Chair/Director:
urbanm
Michael
Urban
UrbanM@missouri.edu
573/884-2658
Geography

Term for Proposal

Spring 2018
 

Course Catalog Information

GN_HON/PRVST
Honors-General (GN_HON)
Honors-General
3242HW
3
 
20
Interdisciplinary Topics in the Human Sciences: The Nature of Humans - Honors/Writing Intensive
This course investigates the dynamic qualities of human experience in psychological, social, and environmental context with a focus on contemporary global issues. Course topics vary by semester but will bridge the social and behavioral sciences to address an overarching question: What makes us human? We will explore the social and behavioral factors that shape our shared human condition as well as those that contribute to diversity in the human experience. We will then investigate the complexities of what it means to be human within the globally interconnected societies we live in today. How do we deal creatively with human diversity in addressing the global problems and uncertainties that confront us? What attitudes, practices, and projects might help us manage global uncertainties and opportunities more effectively? What is your role in the global community of the twenty-first century? In exploring these questions through intensive reading, writing, research, and discussion, this course will help you develop a global consciousness that is sensitive to the lived textures and realities of places and peoples around the world. This course satisfies three credit hours of general education requirements in the behavioral and social sciences and is part of the Honors College's Interdisciplinary Topics in the Human Sciences series. Graded on A-F basis only.
Behavioral Science
Social Science
Lecture/Standard
A-F Only
Honors eligibility required.
 
 
 

Instructor Information

larsens
Soren
Larsen
larsens@missouri.edu
573/882-9613
Geography
10236275
(numbers only)
Tenured Associate Professor
7 Stewart Hall
Yes, in the last five years
100

The Campus Writing Program conducts a two-day faculty workshop to assist with the design and implementation of your writing intensive course. Once your course proposal has been approved by the Campus Writing Program, you will receive information on time, date and location of the workshop.
Indicate below if additional instructors are planned, but specific individuals have not yet been chosen. Check all that apply

Briefly describe the qualifications of the known graduate instructors, or planned qualifications if graduate instructors are still to be selected, bearing in mind that graduate students teaching honors courses should be advanced students with a record of excellent teaching.
 

Honors Course Information

The Honors College at the University of Missouri provides honors students with coursework exemplifying the ideals of higher education and focused on the value of critical thinking, the love of learning, and a commitment to interdisciplinary approaches. To that end, the Honors College has identified four goals to guide the development and delivery of honors courses. The following list describes how this course addresses each of these goals.
1. Critical Thinking: This course is designed to strengthen and sharpen your critical thinking by inviting you to integrate your own genealogy, life experiences, and personal and professional goals within the intellectual frameworks of place-based and cosmopolitan philosophies as these are expressed in different traditions, from Indigenous and Greek thought to Enlightenment and contemporary Western scholarship. In so doing, you will learn the skills involved in synopsizing, critiquing, and synthesizing scholarly literature in the social and behavioral sciences.
2. Effective Communication: GN_HON 3242 is a Writing Intensive (WI) course that uses the methods of peer review, instructor feedback, the process of revision, and oral presentations to help you write a series of essays that engage course themes and compose a final paper that articulates, for your own personal and professional life, what it means to be a global citizen and the responsibilities and obligations such citizenship entails.
3. A Community of Thinkers: This course depends on your active intellectual engagement and commitment to our collective educational growth. As thinkers who no doubt will differ in our perspectives and goals, we also share the values of inquiry intrinsic to a liberal arts education. You will routinely be asked to share your interpretations and questions regarding global citizenship with others in this class, and to help others develop their own critical perspective on global citizenship. We will also have a number of guest speakers from campus and the community join and engage us in our community of thought.
4. Nurturing Creative Potential: This course will help you develop the creative potential of your professional and personal life potential by using critical thinking and communication skills to identify and operationalize your future goals in education, career, service, and the “good life.”
1
Answer the questions below as they would apply to one section. For all other sections, provide similar information in the Additional Sections Information box below.
 
Thursdays
Tuesdays
930
1045
Geological Sciences Bldg 107
Short essays
Oral reports
Other
Term papers
 
Six reaction papers
Three takehome assignments
Two times leading discussion
Participation score
20
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Course Information

GN_HON 3242HW is part of the upper-division series of courses in the Honors College that invites students to investigate the dynamic qualities of human experience in psychological, social, and environmental context with a focus on contemporary global issues. Course topics vary by semester but will bridge the social and behavioral sciences to address an overarching question: What makes us human? The course explores the social and behavioral factors that shape the human condition as well as those that contribute to diversity in the human experience. It then investigates the complexities of what it means to be human within the globally interconnected societies we live in today. How do we deal creatively with human diversity to address the global problems and uncertainties that confront us? What attitudes, practices, and projects might help us manage global uncertainties and opportunities effectively? What is your role in the global community of the twenty-first century? In exploring these questions through intensive reading, writing, research, and discussion, this course will help students develop a global consciousness that is sensitive to the lived textures and realities of places and peoples around the world. In the version of the course for which I am seeking Writing Intensive designation, I will be working with honors students to explore the relationship between place and globalization within the framework of place-based (Indigenous) and cosmopolitan philosophies. Our focus will be on Indigenous societies around the world whose members are negotiating their own political sovereignty, cultural traditions, and individual identities amidst the forces of globalization--all while caring for the lands and places they have occupied for countless generations. This framework will allow us to consider the psychological, social, and cultural dimensions of the human experience of globalization while attending to the different "natures" (local environments) that factor into that experience and make it meaningful. The writing component for this course is designed to help students engage the same kind of negotiations Indigenous communities are facing by writing about their own relationships to place and community as a global citizen of the twenty-first century. Through a series of seminar discussions, students will engage and critique place-based (Indigenous) philosophies as well as contemporary versions of cosmopolitan thought. This reading will prepare the students for their final paper assignment as it unfolds over the course of the semester.
Prior to teaching the course this semester (Spring 2017), I modified the syllabus and the changes are reflected in this proposal update. I do not have student evaluations on this semester's offering yet, but based on informal feedback and my own reflections on the course, it is working quite well as structured. The major change I made was to separate out the academic critique essay from the personal essay (formerly, they had been combined within one big semester-long writing project). This structure has worked better for students this semester in that they can receive feedback earlier in the semester, and focus on writing and critical thinking skills appropriate to each task. It is also less daunting that one large writing project. I plan to keep the readings, reaction papers, and assignments all the same for the spring 2018 offering. I think I have found a structure that works, but am interested to read the student evaluations after the semester is over, and might make minor changes depending on the nature of that commentary.

Also note that the name/title of this course will be changed per a conversation with Jenelle Beavers, Megan Boyer, and Karthik Panchanathan -- it will be called "Ethics of Global Citizenship" (still Writing Intensive) in order to better reflect the course content and to differentiate it from Karthik's course, Human Nature.
Face-to-face
Self paced?

10
20
Should this course be considered for funding?

Large Enrollment Courses:
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Assignments

Words
Writing Project - Personal Essay
A personal essay of 4500 words in which students identify a topic that engages course content to reflect on the meanings and responsibilities of global citizenship using ethical perspectives developed in class. In the early part of the semester, students will begin this project through a series of reflective writing assignments. Students will share these personal essays with the class, both for feedback and to build a sense of comradely with their peers. Students will conduct their own genealogy research as part of the course requirements, with assistance from the instructor. The personal essay is designed to help students learn how to use writing to stimulate and shape the process of personal reflection, and how sharing written reflection with peers sharpens one's understanding of oneself and others.
Length of assignment:
4500
peers and instructor
4500
instructor
9000

Critical essay
(2) A critical essay of 2,500 words, which provides a synopsis and critique of cosmopolitan philosophies based on the assigned readings. A draft will be submitted for review by peers and professor, revised, and resubmitted for a second review by the professor. Students will revise their drafts based on this feedback and prepare a final version for inclusion in the final paper. The critical essay is designed to help students learn how to use the writing process to move through the stages of critical interpretation of literature: synopsis, critique, and synthesis. A pair of reaction papers will assist students in this process, effectively serving as "starter drafts" for the components of their critical essay.
Length of assignment:
2500
peer/instructor
2500
instructor
5000

Total pages for all assignments:
First drafts:
21.21
Revisions:
21.21
42.42
 

Writing Intensive Teaching

Instructor provided feedback
Oral presentation by student, followed by feedback
Other
Peer review
Students will receive feedback on their work from the instructor and in small peer-group workshops. In the workshops, three students working together as a review group will review drafts of three components of the final paper at different points in the semester. Each of these three class periods will be devoted entirely to workshopping their drafts. Students will be prepped on workshop protocol and revision technique in the week before the first workshop, and they will consult The Elements of Style (required for the class) during their review of drafts. During the workshop, the instructor will circulate among the groups to help students deliver and receive feedback on their work. The workshops will incorporate oral presentation as the student will explain and ask questions of other students about their writing. Students will also make two oral presentations (of approximately five minutes each) to receive feedback on the personal essay component of the final paper. In addition to the workshops and oral presentations, the instructor will read and comment on all drafts prior to the final product. Students will then be assessed on how well they incorporate student and instructor feedback into the final draft of their completed paper.
 
The entire framework of the final paper is based on a question that has more than one acceptable interpretation - the meaning of global citizenship in the 21st century and the responsibilities and obligations such citizenship entails in one's own personal and professional life. The personal essay will help students learn how to refine and sharpen their own understanding of the problem whereas the critical essay will help them learn to critique and synthesize relevant literature to build a solid platform for the position paper on global citizenship. In each element, personal essay, critical essay, and position paper, there is a wide latitude for response and interpretation. The seminar discussions, in-class workshops, ongoing instructor feedback on reactions papers, and presentations by other faculty are part of a broader strategy to provide students with the materials, skills, and confidence to deal with the uncertainty and openness they will invariably confront in writing a sustained, well-informed interpretation of global citizenship that leads to a platform for one's own personal and professional life.
The course begins with two reaction papers designed to "free the pens" of students for thinking about the course content. These reaction papers will also give the instructor an opportunity to survey the students' writing capabilities and offer preliminary feedback. The remaining reaction papers will be due periodically during the course of the semester to support themes from reading and discussion. The "Who You Are Is Where You Are" essay is the "starter draft" for the personal essay, and it is due at the beginning of the third week of class. The instructor will review and critique these essays for content and style, offering more substantive guidance for concise, vigorous writing. We then move into the peer writing workshops. The class will be organized into writing groups of three students each. Students will provide drafts of sections from the final paper to the other two members of their peer group, and will have one week to read and comment on the drafts they receive from their peers before participating in the workshop the following week. The draft of the first section is due in week four; the draft of the second section is due in week eight; and the draft of the third section is due in week eleven. The draft for the introduction and transition sections is due in week fourteen and will be reviewed and edited by the instructor only. The final paper is due on the day of the final exam.
65
%
 
0
 

Course Syllabus

Upload Course Syllabus

Administrative Information

Humanities and Arts
 
 

Acknowledgement

I have read and reviewed the updated proposal

Additional Comments

GN_HON 3242HW, 01 has been flagged as Honors and Writing Intensive for the Spring 2018 semester.
 
Key: 206