Date Submitted: Tue, 15 Aug 2017 16:06:46 GMT

Viewing: T_A_M 2520W johnstonnr : History of Western Dress - Writing Intensive

Last approved: Mon, 06 Mar 2017 14:21:30 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 06 Mar 2017 14:21:22 GMT

Changes proposed by: johnstonnr

Proposal Type

Writing Intensive

Contact Information

johnstonnr
Nicole
Johnston
johnstonnr@missouri.edu
573/882-7317
Textile and Apparel Mgmt
Are you submitting this proposal on behalf of an instructor?

Instructor for whom you are submitting proposal:
johnstonnr
Nicole
Johnston
johnstonnr@missouri.edu
573/882-7317
Textile and Apparel Mgmt
Subject Area’s Department Chair/Director:
norump
Pamela
Weagley
NorumP@missouri.edu
573/882-2934
Textile and Apparel Mgmt

Term for Proposal

 
Summer 2017

Course Catalog Information

HES
Textile And Apparel Management (T_A_M)
Textile And Apparel Management
2520W
3
 
75
History of Western Dress - Writing Intensive
Surveys the history of Western dress from prehistory through the 18th Century.
Humanities
Social Science
Lecture/Standard with Discussion
A-F (allow student to choose S/U option)
ENGLSH 1000.
 
 
 

Instructor Information

johnstonnr
Nicole
Johnston
johnstonnr@missouri.edu
573/882-7317
Textile and Apparel Mgmt
(numbers only)
Non-teaching Staff
137 Stanley Hall
 
 

The Campus Writing Program conducts a two-day faculty workshop to assist with the design and implementation of your writing intensive course. Once your course proposal has been approved by the Campus Writing Program, you will receive information on time, date and location of the workshop.
Indicate below if additional instructors are planned, but specific individuals have not yet been chosen. Check all that apply

Briefly describe the qualifications of the known graduate instructors, or planned qualifications if graduate instructors are still to be selected, bearing in mind that graduate students teaching honors courses should be advanced students with a record of excellent teaching.
 

Honors Course Information

 
 
Answer the questions below as they would apply to one section. For all other sections, provide similar information in the Additional Sections Information box below.
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Course Information

TAM 2520W is a general survey of the history of Western dress and its global influences from prehistory to 1850. Class lecture is delivered in online Powerpoint and Tegrity lecture formats utilizing a Canvas course site. TAM 2520W qualifies as both Social Science and Humanities/Fine Art General Education electives.
The most significant change to the summer course is the conversion of lecture content and assignments to a fully online model. Students complete video tutorial assignments created by various campus collections in place of actual campus visits. Students also utilize TurnItIn for online peer review rather than completing an in-class peer review.
Online
Self paced?
No
75
25
Should this course be considered for funding?
No
Large Enrollment Courses:
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Assignments

Pages
Elizabeth: Gender and Dress
Students identify, analyze and interpret the role of dress during the time of Queen Elizabeth 1 utilizing lecture resources while watching the film Elizabeth. Factors of the period's social, political, technological, economic, religious, and communication structures are analyzed and interpreted in relation to dress.
Length of assignment:
2
Instructor/GTA
 
 
2

Masculinities and Medieval English Sumptuary Laws Reading Guide
Students interpret and critique a peer-reviewed academic article by answering questions in short-answer format. Other questions help them better understand how English dress of the Medieval period was affected by sumptuary laws and how these laws reveal the social and gender structures of the period.
Length of assignment:
1
Instructor
 
 
1

Evolution of Information Technology and Its Effects on Dress Part II
Students watch a video tutorial by Special Collections and Rare Books before completing a short answer assignment related to the evolution of information technology from prehistory to the 18th century and its effects on the communication of dress.
Length of assignment:
2
Instructor/GTA
 
 
2

Language of Dress in Visual Art
Students interpret a variety of factors that caused change in dress revealed within a selected artwork from their favorite historical time period studied over the course of the semester. This assignment is essentially a synthesis of the main course topics analyzed and discussed during each time period reviewed. Through research students discover how effectively dress within an artwork reveals information about that time period through dress, imagery and symbolism. Prior to creating a first draft, students produce an annotated bibliography of a small number of primary and secondary sources which are then used in the first and final drafts of the paper. The course instructor and/or class peers review the paper utilizing TurnItIn. A significant revision is expected for the final draft.
Length of assignment:
5
Peer review
5
Instructor/GTA
10

Fashion Technology
This is the first writing assignment for the course and is a short answer assignment to introduce the students to critical thinking and formatting complete sentences. Students watch a variety of textile construction technology videos of both hand and mechanical processes to compare, contrast, and analyze the different methods and processes. Students are introduced to past, present and future technologies in the apparel industry.
Length of assignment:
1
Instructor
 
 
1

Pompeii: Life and Death in a Roman Town
Students watch a film documentary on the ancient Roman town of Pompeii and analyze how the dress artifacts and skeletal remains found in a Pompeiian cellar and architectural remains of the city itself reveal Roman social structure, economics, communication and trade, all factors that cause change in dress.
Length of assignment:
1
Instructor
 
 
1

Language of Dress in Visual Art Annotated Bibliography
Prior to creating a first draft of the Language of Dress in Visual Art research paper, students produce a one-page annotated bibliography of primary and secondary sources introduced in an Ellis Library Electronic Classroom video tutorial. These sources are then used in the first and final drafts of the paper.
Length of assignment:
1
Instructor
 
 
1

Lecture Quizzes
A total of 20 half-page short answer quiz responses analyze lecture and video content. Students review a variety of videos and web articles and use lecture content to generate thoughtful responses. Select answers will be posted to a course discussion page for student viewing and analysis.
Length of assignment:
10
Instructor
 
 
10

Masculinities and Medieval English Sumptuary Laws Critical Review
Students generate a short Critical Review of an academic article that analyzes ways in which the author honored and broke away from historical precedent, how well she interpreted dress, status and social structure of Medieval Europe, what kinds and how effectively primary and secondary sources were used within the article, and how well the author formed her argument.
Length of assignment:
3
Instructor and/or Peers
3
Instructor
6

Total pages for all assignments:
First drafts:
26.00
Revisions:
8.00
34.00
The large writing assignment (Language of Dress) may include an additional week of online peer review prior to the due date of the final draft. The instructor is in the process of determining how to provide online access of each student's TurnItIn draft to an individual peer in the course for online review. Students will be required to watch a video tutorial explaining how to utilize TurnItIn editing tools.

Writing Intensive Teaching

Instructor provided feedback
Peer review
 
 
Multiple interpretations are encouraged in this course. To complete the Language of Dress in Visual Art assignment, students are first introduced to a variety of online digital databases from which they can research and interpret primary and secondary sources in order to analyze the variety of meanings, symbolism and roles of dress within an artwork from a time period of their choice. A critical component of researching and comprehending academic writing involves critical analysis. Students read a peer-reviewed article and analyze ways in which the author honored and broke away from historical precedent, how well she interpreted dress, status and social structure of Medieval Europe, what kinds and how effectively primary and secondary sources were used within the article, and how well she formed her argument (See Medieval English Sumptuary Laws Critical Review.) Students are asked to identify, analyze and interpret the role of dress during the time of Queen Elizabeth 1 (see Elizabeth: Gender and Dress Assignment.) Multiple interpretations are also encouraged in numerous lecture quizzes based on lecture and video/web content which enable students to analyze and describe their own personal opinions, beliefs and preferences in short-answer format.
Students do not have required weekly readings, so more significance is placed on writing assignments. Writing is distributed in a manner which attempts to build on knowledge and writing skills as the semester progresses and tries to balance the amount of reading, research and writing at any given time. Students begin the semester with a few short answer assignments followed by a critical analysis of an academic article in which students analyze in more detail the formatting and substance of academic writing. The last large writing assignment introduces them to existing online resources which they must analyze and interpret for their research paper. The larger writing assignments are at the end of the course in order to build on the practice of writing, research and analysis throughout the first part of the course.
95
%
 
0
 

Course Syllabus

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Administrative Information

Education and Social Sciences
 
 

Acknowledgement

I have read and reviewed the updated proposal

Additional Comments

As 90% of students enrolled in TAM 2520W are usually non-TAM majors, the course reaches a broad range of students from numerous disciplines across campus. Not only do these students develop a broader understanding of diverse culture and gender-related issues, they also better comprehend the evolution of human cultural development over time when viewing history through the common element of dress.
Patricia Luckenotte (luckenottep) (Mon, 06 Mar 2017 14:21:22 GMT): T_A_M 2520W, 01 and 01A has been added to the Summer 2017 schedule of classes.
Key: 535