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Viewing: AR_H_A 1120W yonanm : Renaissance through Modern Art - Writing Intensive

Last approved: Thu, 06 Oct 2016 20:50:02 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 06 Oct 2016 20:50:02 GMT

Proposal Type

Writing Intensive

Contact Information

ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program
Are you submitting this proposal on behalf of an instructor?
Yes
Instructor for whom you are submitting proposal:
yonanm
Michael
Yonan
yonanm@missouri.edu
573/882-6711
Art History & Classical Archae
Subject Area’s Department Chair/Director:
ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program

Term for Proposal

 
Spring 2017

Course Catalog Information

A&S
Art History And Archaeology (AR_H_A)
Art History And Archaeology
1120W
3
 
30
Renaissance through Modern Art - Writing Intensive
Introductory survey of architecture, sculpture and painting of Europe and America from the Renaissance to Modern times.
Humanities
Lecture/Standard with Discussion
A-F (allow student to choose S/U option)
 
 
 
 

Instructor Information

yonanm
Michael
Yonan
yonanm@missouri.edu
573/882-6711
Art History & Classical Archae
(numbers only)
Tenured Associate Professor
 
Yes, in the last five years
 

vandykej
James
Van Dyke
vandykej@missouri.edu
573/882-6711
Art History & Classical Archae
(numbers only)
Tenured Associate Professor
 
Yes, in the last five years
 

The Campus Writing Program conducts a two-day faculty workshop to assist with the design and implementation of your writing intensive course. Once your course proposal has been approved by the Campus Writing Program, you will receive information on time, date and location of the workshop.
Indicate below if additional instructors are planned, but specific individuals have not yet been chosen. Check all that apply

Briefly describe the qualifications of the known graduate instructors, or planned qualifications if graduate instructors are still to be selected, bearing in mind that graduate students teaching honors courses should be advanced students with a record of excellent teaching.
 

Honors Course Information

 
 
Answer the questions below as they would apply to one section. For all other sections, provide similar information in the Additional Sections Information box below.
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Course Information

ARHA 1120 is an introductory survey of the architecture, sculpture, and painting in Europe and America from the
Renaissance to modern times, with some engagement with the arts of early modern and modern Islamic, African, Asian, and non-Anglo American cultures. It is offered every spring as the second half of a comprehensive global survey sequence for students majoring in Art History and Archaeology (and other majors for which it is a requirement, like the BFA in studio art) with the first half offered every fall. It also is often taken by students who simply need to fill a humanities requirement, or who are interested in art. This is a large enrollment course with multiple discussion sections including the proposed WI section (Section K this semester), so exams will take place in the main lecture meetings while all of the reviewed and revised writing and discussion will take place in Section K.
 
Face-to-face
Self paced?

 
50
Should this course be considered for funding?
Yes
Large Enrollment Courses:
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Assignments

Words
Digital Museum
1. Digital Museum: In the major assignment, which is distributed over the semester, students will curate their own digital museum on the Blackboard Wiki. This will consist of one entry on a work of art or architecture from each of three units of the course. Students may address an object or monument we have discussed in class, but at least three should be adopted from the many monuments included in the textbook that we do not have time to discuss in lectures. At least three of these objects or monuments also should be discussed in terms of a contemporary text. With the help of a CWP course development grant, I have compiled a bibliography of short primary texts that fall into three categories. The first consists of texts about artists, such as the myth-building, biographies written by the 16th-century artist Vasari about his predecessors and contemporaries. Another group includes texts about art in general, such as Winckelmann’s mid-18th-century reflection on imitating ancient Greek art. A final category includes works written by the artists themselves, from letters that complain about their patrons (Dürer) to manifestos about the nature and goals of art and architecture (Gropius). Since the material we study in this class was made years, decades, or centuries before our students were even born, it can be difficult for them to understand the works as “contemporary” in their original contexts. We hope that this combination of primary texts and visual analysis will help our 21st-century students make a stronger connection to the objects, their makers, and their original users. We will encourage the students to revisit their earlier entries as their thinking develops, so we envision a final product that reflects the arc of an individual student’s growth over the semester. We hope that this exercise will build an intellectual habit of critical viewing and re-viewing that they can carry forward beyond this course. These wiki entries will be completed by specific dates/times, and there will be a schedule and rubric (emphasizing higher-order concerns) for peer commentary using the Wiki editing tool. Each final entry should be between 500 and 600 words long (one single-spaced text page – probably a little shorter for initial drafts) and will be worth 7% of the total grade.
5 x 7 = 35%; 5 x 550 words = 2750 words for the final draft, 5000 words for all. The final versions will be graded by the GTA and instructor. Since students will have the opportunity to revise their earlier entries as the semester proceeds, the individual entry grades may be updated after the final entry is completed. Ideally there will be time for in-class presentations by the digital curators at the end of the semester, in the week before all sections review for the last exam.
Length of assignment:
2250
Instructor/TA
2750
Instructor/TA
5000

2. Short Assignments
2. Short Assignments: Short writing assignments in the context of the discussion section will build skills needed for writing the wiki, and also for the exams. These will be executed and peer reviewed in class, and submitted for instructor evaluation within a week. These assignments will include short formal writing exercises (such as analysis paragraphs, in which we will ask the students “to take a thing apart to discover how the pieces work together to create a whole” [Hudson and Noonan-Morrissey, The Art of Writing about Art, p. 7], or comparison essays) and presentations, like role-playing 19th and 20th-century artists’ manifestos. These will be peer-reviewed in class and receive a final grade from the GTA and instructors. These in-section assignments will total about 5 pages of written work (1250 words draft and revised) and 10% of the course grade.
Length of assignment:
1250
TA and Instructors
1250
TA and Instructors
2500

Total pages for all assignments:
First drafts:
10.61
Revisions:
12.12
22.73
The students in the writing-intensive section will complete a variety of reviewed and revised writing assignments that ask the students to think not only about their responses to the works of art and architecture that are our primary focus, but also about other contemporary documents, including the words of the artists who made them or the viewers to whom those works were first displayed.

Writing Intensive Teaching

Instructor provided feedback
 
 
All of the assignments provide opportunities for different analyses and evaluations, and the main assignment itself depends on the students exploring and defending their own choices of objects, and learning what contemporary makers or viewers thought about them.
Distributed throughout semester
45
%
Because this is a WI section within a non-WI course, I include the grade percentages for both so you can see how it breaks down: 1120-01 grade distribution – overall course: 3 In-Class Exams = 60% 12 Online Quizzes = 10% Weekly Discussion sections = 20% (10% attendance, 10% quizzes/exercises /writing) Paper = 10%. 1120-01 Section K grade distribution — writing-intensive: 3 In-Class Exams = 45% 3 Object Essays = 30% Weekly Discussion sections = 25% (10% attendance, 15% reviewed and revised writing) In both cases the in-class exams are largely essay, so while 45% of the WI grade comes specifically from written and reviewed exercises, they will earn around 80% of their course grade by writing.
2
Both sections in 1120-03 are part of a larger multi-section course in which lecturing faculty supervise several GTAs who lead the discussion sections (including regular, online, and writing-intensive). An experienced graduate teaching assistant will lead each of the two writing-intensive discussion sections, grade the in-class exams, and will also provide primary assessment on their reviewed/ revised writing, with subsequent commentary and approval of grades by lecturing faculty.

Course Syllabus

Upload Course Syllabus

Administrative Information

Humanities and Arts
 
 

Acknowledgement


Additional Comments

 
Campus Writing Program (muascwp) (Tue, 13 Sep 2016 19:45:08 GMT): There is an assignment called "Additional Writing" for 1000 words, but there is no description. EAS 9.13.16
Patricia Luckenotte (luckenottep) (Thu, 06 Oct 2016 20:49:55 GMT): Per Linda Garrison only section 02 of AR_H_A 1120 is to be listed as WI. I have added AR_H_A 1120W, 01, 01A and 01B to the Spring 2017 schedule of classes and cancelled AR_H_A 1120, 02, 02A and 02B for Spring 2017
Key: 555