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Viewing: ENGLSH 4168W konklem : Major Authors, 1789-1890

Last approved: Tue, 13 Sep 2016 16:15:09 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 13 Sep 2016 13:09:21 GMT

Proposal Type

Writing Intensive

Contact Information

ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program
Are you submitting this proposal on behalf of an instructor?
Yes
Instructor for whom you are submitting proposal:
konklem
Maureen
Konkle
KonkleM@missouri.edu
573/882-6421
English
Subject Area’s Department Chair/Director:
ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program

Term for Proposal

 
Fall 2016

Course Catalog Information

A&S
English (ENGLSH)
English
4168
3
 
30
Major Authors, 1789-1890
See ENGLSH 4160 for course description.
Humanities
Lecture/Standard
A-F (allow student to choose S/U option)
 
 
 
 

Instructor Information

konklem
Maureen
Konkle
KonkleM@missouri.edu
573/882-6421
English
(numbers only)
Tenured Associate Professor
 
Yes, in the last five years
 

The Campus Writing Program conducts a two-day faculty workshop to assist with the design and implementation of your writing intensive course. Once your course proposal has been approved by the Campus Writing Program, you will receive information on time, date and location of the workshop.
Indicate below if additional instructors are planned, but specific individuals have not yet been chosen. Check all that apply

Briefly describe the qualifications of the known graduate instructors, or planned qualifications if graduate instructors are still to be selected, bearing in mind that graduate students teaching honors courses should be advanced students with a record of excellent teaching.
 

Honors Course Information

 
 
Answer the questions below as they would apply to one section. For all other sections, provide similar information in the Additional Sections Information box below.
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Course Information

This course is a study of the writing of William Apess, a Pequot writer active in the 1820s and 1830s, and Frederick Douglass, covering a selection of his writing over the course of his career, from the 1840s to the 1890s. It’s centered on their struggle to argue for equality and liberation and against exclusion and oppression on behalf of indigenous, African American, but also other groups of people. It takes a broad view of US culture and political ideology in the period, and incorporates readings in literature, history, journalism, and political discourse, as well as representative contemporary scholarship, in addition to the works of Apess and Douglass. The research component will be limited to the course readings so that students can concentrate on in-depth reading of the material.
 
Face-to-face
Self paced?

 
15
Should this course be considered for funding?

Large Enrollment Courses:
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Assignments

Pages
All assignments
Ten pass/fail one-page (330 words) response papers over the course of the semester, with a question/prompt from me. Due weekly, discussed in class, and reviewed by me.

Three eight to nine-page (2500-3000 words) papers. (1) at week 6, on William Apess, based on ideas generated through response papers; (2) at week 13, on Frederick Douglass, based on ideas generated through response papers; (3) a synthesizing paper on the implications of Apess and Douglass for the present day, due at the end of week 15, reviewed by me and returned Monday 12 December and completed by the end of finals week, 16 December.

Revision: Papers 1 and 2 will be peer-reviewed in class, then final submission; Paper 3 will be reviewed by me and revised. In addition, students have the option to revise any papers for a higher grade, all of which will be due during finals week.
Length of assignment:
24
Instructor
24
Instructor
48

Total pages for all assignments:
First drafts:
24.00
Revisions:
24.00
48.00
Additional Writing: 10 Pages

Writing Intensive Teaching

Instructor provided feedback
 
 
All of the assignments require students to analyze and interpet the material, which includes writing by Apess and Douglass as well as additional readings to illustrate or expand on key points in their work.
Weekly response papers beginning week 2 and except for weeks 6, 13, 14, and 15; papers due at the end of weeks 6, 13, and finals week.
100
%
 
0
 

Course Syllabus

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Administrative Information

Humanities and Arts
 
 

Acknowledgement


Additional Comments

 
 
Key: 556