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Viewing: PHIL 1100H kwsb56 : Introduction to Ethics - Honors

Last approved: Wed, 02 Nov 2016 22:03:36 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 02 Nov 2016 22:03:36 GMT

Proposal Type

Honors

Contact Information

kwsb56
Kenneth
Shields
kwsb56@mail.missouri.edu
573/882-2871
Philosophy
Are you submitting this proposal on behalf of an instructor?
No
Instructor for whom you are submitting proposal:
kwsb56
Kenneth
Shields
kwsb56@mail.missouri.edu
573/882-2871
Philosophy
Subject Area’s Department Chair/Director:
mcgrathma
Matthew
McGrath
mcgrathma@missouri.edu
573/882-6546
Philosophy

Term for Proposal

Spring 2017
 

Course Catalog Information

A&S
Philosophy (PHIL)
Philosophy
1100H
3
 
30
Introduction to Ethics - Honors
Introduction to different philosophical theories regarding when acts are morally right rather than wrong; when things are good rather than bad; nature of the "good life", nature of ethical reasoning and justification.
Humanities
Lecture/Standard
A-F (allow student to choose S/U option)
Honors eligibility required.
 
 
 

Instructor Information

kwsb56
Kenneth
Shields
kwsb56@mail.missouri.edu
573/882-2871
Philosophy
(numbers only)
Adjunct Instructor
Strickland Hall, #422
 
 

The Campus Writing Program conducts a two-day faculty workshop to assist with the design and implementation of your writing intensive course. Once your course proposal has been approved by the Campus Writing Program, you will receive information on time, date and location of the workshop.
Indicate below if additional instructors are planned, but specific individuals have not yet been chosen. Check all that apply

Briefly describe the qualifications of the known graduate instructors, or planned qualifications if graduate instructors are still to be selected, bearing in mind that graduate students teaching honors courses should be advanced students with a record of excellent teaching.
 

Honors Course Information

Course Description
“What should I do?” – “What should we do?” – “How ought I to live?” – Finding answers to these questions is the goal of moral philosophy, or ethics. In this course, we will consider these questions in light of historical and contemporary philosophical thinking within the field of ethics. After familiarizing ourselves with the traditional moral categories and positions, we will turn to what is called applied ethics: evaluating particular actions and practices in a philosophically critical manner.

Course Goals
After completing the entire course, you should be able to:

• Grasp and explain some of the predominant philosophical positions regarding classic and contemporary problems within ethics and metaethics.

• Construct formal arguments from informal written passages and essays.

• Distinguish among a variety of different kinds of claims (e.g., ethical claims, ontological claims, conceptual claims, scientific claims, etc.), as well as determine what kinds of evidence such claims would require if to be reasonably believed.

• Better express one’s own perspective through writing and speaking, regarding both the philosophical problems raised in this course as well as issues that arise in every day contexts.

Honors expectations
Honors students should be prepared to discuss the issues and questions at a level that reflects a close and critical reading of the articles assigned. To that end, I (a) make original, primary texts required reading, as opposed to merely suggested, (b) have students get more practice with philosophical writing, and finally (c) I devote less class time to addressing relatively basic concepts, giving us more time to discuss the issues and raise content questions. I will of course be available during office hours and online through our Blackboard site’s general discussion forum to answer any questions and to work one-on-one.

Course content: readings and discussions covering the four main branches of philosophical ethics -- value theory, normative ethics, applied ethics, and metaethics.
1
Answer the questions below as they would apply to one section. For all other sections, provide similar information in the Additional Sections Information box below.
 

 
 
 
Short essays
Other
Term papers
 
two exams (no final), discussion posts, in-class activities
30
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Course Information

 
 

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Writing Intensive Assignments


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Course Syllabus

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Administrative Information

Humanities and Arts
 
 

Acknowledgement


Additional Comments

This is my first time submitting, so please contact me if I've left something out or if an adjustment needs to be made in the materials submitted.
Patricia Luckenotte (luckenottep) (Wed, 02 Nov 2016 22:03:32 GMT): This class is listed as PHIL 1100H, 01 for Spring 2017
Key: 595