Preview Workflow

Viewing: LTC 4085W kubyc : Problems in Curriculum and Instruction

Last approved: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 17:45:30 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 17:45:30 GMT

Proposal Type

Writing Intensive

Contact Information

ciscojo
Jonathan
Cisco
CiscoJo@missouri.edu
573/884-6221
Campus Writing Program
Are you submitting this proposal on behalf of an instructor?
Yes
Instructor for whom you are submitting proposal:
kubyc
Candace
Kuby
kubyc@missouri.edu
573/882-2965
Learning Teaching & Curriculum
Subject Area’s Department Chair/Director:
tarrj
James
Tarr
TarrJ@missouri.edu
573/882-4034
Learning Teaching & Curriculum

Term for Proposal

 
Spring 2017

Course Catalog Information

EDUC
Learning, Teaching, & Curriculum (LTC)
Learning, Teaching, & Curriculum
4085
1
3
30
Problems in Curriculum and Instruction
Studies professional programs and issues in health or physical education.
 
Individual Study
A-F (allow student to choose S/U option)
 
 
 
instructor's consent.

Instructor Information

kubyc
Candace
Kuby
kubyc@missouri.edu
573/882-2965
Learning Teaching & Curriculum
(numbers only)
Tenured Associate Professor
 
Yes, but instructor doesn’t recall when or it has been longer than five years
 

The Campus Writing Program conducts a two-day faculty workshop to assist with the design and implementation of your writing intensive course. Once your course proposal has been approved by the Campus Writing Program, you will receive information on time, date and location of the workshop.
Indicate below if additional instructors are planned, but specific individuals have not yet been chosen. Check all that apply
Associate Faculty Member
Briefly describe the qualifications of the known graduate instructors, or planned qualifications if graduate instructors are still to be selected, bearing in mind that graduate students teaching honors courses should be advanced students with a record of excellent teaching.
 

Honors Course Information

 
 
Answer the questions below as they would apply to one section. For all other sections, provide similar information in the Additional Sections Information box below.
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Course Information

This three-hour course will examine the development of literacy in young learners, mostly in K-3 classrooms. We will explore literacy theories and their application to classroom teaching, specifically instructional and assessment strategies. We will write, confer, and inquire together to better understand how to design, implement, and evaluate learning experiences that foster children's literacy development as well as their creativity and curiosity.

Unpacking my Histories, Cultures, and Experiences in Relation to Literacy Teaching 10% of final grade In this assignment you'll critically reflection on your beliefs, memories, experiences and ideologies that shape your pedagogical decisions as a literacy teacher. Teaching is not neutral so we need to examine the self in relation to how we plan instruction and interact with children. You will use multiple modes (writing, artistic, digital, performative, etc.) of collecting memories/artifacts to represent your learning and analysis about the self. - Students bring in one draft to discuss in class with a peer. The length depends on the mode they use (some it is written 4-8 pages, others artistic sketches, etc. -- page equivalent to 4-8 pages). Peers evaluate the draft.

Reading/Writing Responses (due on Mondays) 5% of final grade. By each Monday you will read and write responses to the readings. Here are three main reasons I use reading/writing responses: to deepen your thinking about the course readings, to elicit questions and comments to share during class, and to model possible comprehension strategies to use with children. If you've read the assigned chapters/articles thoroughly, none of these responses should take a long time to complete. If you are spending hours on a response -- that is too long. I read these responses as a way to have a window into your current thinking about topics discussed in class as well as to see what misconceptions and questions you have. It is OK for these responses to be handwritten (as long as it is neat and legible). See the section "Alternate Reader Response Strategies" at the end of the syllabus for specific explanations of R/W response strategies. No drafts shared for this assignment. Typically 2-4 pages long for each response.

Writer’s Notebook & Published Piece of Writing - 15% of final grade
In order to be effective teachers of writing, it is important that we participate in the writing process on a regular basis to understand what it feels like to be writers and to more deeply understand the actions/decisions that writers make. Throughout the semester, you will keep a writer’s notebook as a place to collect thoughts, ideas, reflections, observations, artifacts, and quickwrites on a weekly basis. You will be expected to make entries in your notebook at least 2 times throughout each week. During the semester, you will be talking with peers about this experience as a writer. You will select a seed idea(s) from your writers’ notebook to take through the publishing process. In class, we will have peer conferences on editing and revising this selected piece. You will turn in your final writing notebook piece (along with conferencing notes & the drafts – I want to see the process not just the finished product). The final piece will be shared and celebrated during class. (The page range varies on this assignment - some do short stories, some poetry, some artistic texts - no matter what format they choose they all go through a process of editing and revising before publishing a final piece).

Literacy Unit of Study Curriculum Plan 15% of final grade As a teacher of literacy, you need to be able to plan lessons that meet diverse students needs (i.e. gifted, ELL, or students striving to make sense of print). Using a workshop and/or playshop approach, you'll create an overall framework and mini-lessons for one literacy unit of study for a K-3 grade. As a teacher it is important to collaborate with co-workers, so for this assignment you will work in small groups to plan, brainstorm, gather materials and create the unit of study. In class, we will use a jigsaw format in sharing these units of study with each other. No drafts shared for this assignment in a formal way. However, this assignment is a group project so they are expected to each read all aspects of the assignment and give feedback to peers before turning it in to me. This assignment is about 20-30 pages long.

Participating as a Professional Learner 15% of final grade Midway and at the end of the semester you will complete a self-evaluation of your participation in the course. These should serve as a guide and check point for you and me. No drafts shared for this assignment. This is about 4 pages long total (including both mid-term and final evaluations).
 
Face-to-face
Self paced?

 
23
Should this course be considered for funding?
Yes
Large Enrollment Courses:
 
 
 

Writing Intensive Assignments

Pages
Unpacking my Histories, Cultures, and Experiences in Relation to Literacy Teaching
Unpacking my Histories, Cultures, and Experiences in Relation to Literacy Teaching 10% of final grade In this assignment you'll critically reflection on your beliefs, memories, experiences and ideologies that shape your pedagogical decisions as a literacy teacher. Teaching is not neutral so we need to examine the self in relation to how we plan instruction and interact with children. You will use multiple modes (writing, artistic, digital, performative, etc.) of collecting memories/artifacts to represent your learning and analysis about the self. - Students bring in one draft to discuss in class with a peer. The length depends on the mode they use (some it is written 4-8 pages, others artistic sketches, etc. -- page equivalent to 4-8 pages). Peers evaluate the draft.
Length of assignment:
6
Peer
6
Instructor
12

Writer's Notebook and Published Piece of Writing
Writer's Notebook and Published Piece of Writing 15% of final grade In order to be effective teachers of writing, it is important that we participate in the writing process on a regular basis to understand what it feels like to be writers and to more deeply understand the actions/decisions that writers make. Throughout the semester, you will keep a writer's notebook as a place to collect thoughts, ideas, reflections, observations, artifacts, and quickwrites on a weekly basis. You will be expected to make entries in your notebook at least 2 times throughout each week. During the semester, you will be talking with peers about this experience as a writer. You will select a seed idea(s) from your writers' notebook to take through the publishing process. In class, we will have peer conferences on editing and revising this selected piece. You will turn in your final writing notebook piece (along with conferencing notes and the drafts -- I want to see the process not just the finished product). The final piece will be shared and celebrated during class. - Students share weekly with a peer the seed ideas collected in their notebooks. Students keep the same partner throughout this assignment (to meet with each week). There is one day set aside for students to bring in a draft copy of their final piece to elicit feedback on editing and revising from a peer. Lengths vary on this assignment depending on mode chosen (written, artistic, performative, digital, etc.). Typically around 4 pages (or page equivalent). Peers evaluate the draft.
Length of assignment:
4
Peer
4
Instructor
8

Reading and writing responses
Reading/Writing Responses (due on Mondays) 5% of final grade. By each Monday you will read and write responses to the readings. Here are three main reasons I use reading/writing responses: to deepen your thinking about the course readings, to elicit questions and comments to share during class, and to model possible comprehension strategies to use with children. If you've read the assigned chapters/articles thoroughly, none of these responses should take a long time to complete. If you are spending hours on a response -- that is too long. I read these responses as a way to have a window into your current thinking about topics discussed in class as well as to see what misconceptions and questions you have. It is OK for these responses to be handwritten (as long as it is neat and legible). See the section "Alternate Reader Response Strategies" at the end of the syllabus for specific explanations of R/W response strategies. No drafts shared for this assignment. Typically 2-4 pages long for each response.
Length of assignment:
4
Instructor
4
Instructor
8

Unit of Study
Literacy Unit of Study Curriculum Plan 15% of final grade As a teacher of literacy, you need to be able to plan lessons that meet diverse students needs (i.e. gifted, ELL, or students striving to make sense of print). Using a workshop and/or playshop approach, you'll create an overall framework and mini-lessons for one literacy unit of study for a K-3 grade. As a teacher it is important to collaborate with co-workers, so for this assignment you will work in small groups to plan, brainstorm, gather materials and create the unit of study. In class, we will use a jigsaw format in sharing these units of study with each other. No drafts shared for this assignment in a formal way. However, this assignment is a group project so they are expected to each read all aspects of the assignment and give feedback to peers before turning it in to me. This assignment is about 20-30 pages long.
Length of assignment:
30
Peer
30
Instructor
60

Participation Reflections
Participating as a Professional Learner 15% of final grade Midway and at the end of the semester you will complete a self-evaluation of your participation in the course. These should serve as a guide and check point for you and me. No drafts shared for this assignment. This is about 4 pages long total (including both mid-term and final evaluations).
Length of assignment:
4
Instructor
4
Instructor
8

Total pages for all assignments:
First drafts:
48.00
Revisions:
48.00
96.00
***CWP Note - This is a conservative estimate of the amount of writing as the informal writing of the Writer's Notebook assignment is not included in the page count.

Writing Intensive Teaching

Instructor provided feedback
Other
Peer review
Peer review - For all assignments above, students engage in feedback with various peers. Peers give oral and written feedback for the assignments. Instructor - All assignments students give peer written and oral feedback in small conferences (informal oral presentations). The instructor (I) sit-in the conferences to support students in giving feedback orally to each other. I take notes on what I hear students sharing, I look over drafts, and offer specific questions and recommendations for them to consider as they revise. So in the end, students get feedback from both peers and me.
 
All assignments allow for more than one interpretation. Reading/Writing Responses -- the format of each week's response invites students to take passages from the readings and critique, question, and connect to their own lives. Writer's Notebook (WN) -- Students have the choice of topic and genre for this assignment. They are allowed to explore pretty much any idea and interpret in a variety of ways. Unit of Study Curriculum Plan -- Students are allowed to take a broad topic (unit of study) for reading and writing and create the curriculum map and lessons. This assignment allows students to live-out and demonstrate their philosophical beliefs on teaching literacy to young children. Participation -- I am soliciting students' feedback on their participation -- how do they see themselves as a learner? The Unpacking my histories & cultures assignment varies based on each student's history, schooling and family experiences, and so forth - so there are multiple ways to address the assignment expectations.
Generally speaking, the following is an outline from one semester of when these assignments were due (this is a spring semester): Reading/Writing Responses -- weekly on Mondays; Writer's Notebook (WN) -- Weekly bring in seed ideas and draft. Final product due 6-8 weeks into the semester; Unit of Study Curriculum Plan -- Due around week 12; Participation -- first one due 8 weeks into the semester; final one due the week before exams. The unpacking histories and cultures assignment happens within the first month of the semester.
60
%
 
0
 

Course Syllabus

Upload Course Syllabus

Administrative Information

Education and Social Sciences
 
 

Acknowledgement


Additional Comments

Submitted on behalf of instructor, as course will be listed as LTC 4085-4 for Spring 2017.

** Please Note ** This course will be SECTION 4 for Spring 2017
Jonathan Cisco (CiscoJo) (Mon, 28 Nov 2016 16:29:44 GMT): pushing through to be flagged, as course content was already approved. Please note: this is for section 4.
Patricia Luckenotte (luckenottep) (Mon, 28 Nov 2016 17:45:21 GMT): I have added LTC 4085W, 01 to the Spring Schedule of classes and cancelled the regular section of LTC 4085, 04. The students that were enrolled in LTC 4085, 04 have been moved to the new section of LTC 4085W, 01
Key: 661