Fisheries and Wildlife

School of Natural Resources
302 Anheuser-Busch Natural Resources Building
(573) 882-3436

The fisheries and wildlife sciences degree is based on a common foundation of biological sciences, ecology, conservation, communication, analytical, social science, humanities, and professional courses that provide students with a basic liberal education as well as prerequisites for additional professional courses.

Most students take courses that prepare them for entry-level, technical positions in fisheries, wildlife, or water quality management with local, state or federal agencies. Such training usually involves taking courses that meet the standards set by The Wildlife Society or the American Fisheries Society to become certified, professional wildlife or fisheries biologists. Other students may complete a program that emphasizes more advanced study and prepares them for careers in resource management, research or administration.

The department offers BSFW; MS and PhD degrees are in Natural Resources with an emphasis area in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences.

Professor  M. E. Gompper**, C. H. Nilon**
Associate Professor D. B. Noltie*
Extension Associate Professor R. A. Pierce II*
Teaching Assistant Professor T. Strauch
Research Assistant Professor J. Whittier*
Curators' Emeritus Professor J. R. Jones** 
Adjunct Assistant Professor D. Diamond*, M. Hubbard, D. Papoulias*, S. Sowa*, D. Tillitt*, L. Vangilder, M. Wildhaber**
Cooperative Associate Professor C. P. Paukert**, A. E. Rosenberger**, F. R. Thompson III**, E. B. Webb*

*

Graduate Faculty Member - membership is required to teach graduate-level courses, chair master's thesis committees, and serve on doctoral examination and dissertation committees.

**

Doctoral Faculty Member - membership is required to chair doctoral examination or dissertation committees.  Graduate faculty membership is a prerequisite for Doctoral faculty membership.

Dual Major Requirements - Fisheries and Wildlife/Forestry

In addition to courses that satisfy General Education requirements, students who plan to complete a Dual Major in Fisheries & Wildlife and Forestry must complete the required F&W, Forestry and elective options to reach 140 credits (this total does not allow any general elective hours).

Major Core Requirements
Science Core
CHEM 1320College Chemistry I4
Physics (select one)
College Physics I
Introductory Meteorology
GEOL 1100Principles of Geology with Laboratory4
SOIL 2100Introduction to Soils3
SOIL 2106Soil Science Laboratory2
General Biology
BIO_SC 1200General Botany with Laboratory5
F_W 1100Introductory Zoology with Laboratory3-5
or BIO_SC 1500 Introduction to Biological Systems with Laboratory
Ecology (select one)
General Ecology
Forest Ecology *
Animal Form/Function course (select one)
Elements of Physiology
Physiology of Domestic Animals
and Physiology of Domestic Animals Laboratory
Animal Physiology
Introduction to Cell Biology
Genetics (select one)
Introduction to Genetics and Evolution for Conservation
General Genetics
Genetics of Agricultural Plants and Animals
Math Sequence
MATH 1100College Algebra3
MATH 1400Calculus for Social and Life Sciences I3
STAT 2530Statistical Methods in Natural Resources3
Professional Core
NAT_R 1070Ecology and Renewable Resource Management3
F_W 2100Colloquium in Fisheries and Wildlife1
Public Speaking (select one)
Verbal Communication in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Principles of Interpretive Outdoor Recreation
Plant Taxonomy
FOREST 2151Dendrology4
Law/Policy
NAT_R 4353Natural Resource Policy/Administration3
NAT_R 3110Natural Resource Biometrics3
Water Quality (select one)
Water Quality and Natural Resource Management
Watershed Management and Water Quality
F_W 3600Introduction to Conservation Biology3
FOREST 4330Practice of Silviculture3
F_W 4500Animal Population Dynamics and Management3
NAT_R 4970Resource Practicum in Natural Resources3
Senior Capstone Course:Complete one from Forestry and one from Fisheries and Wildlife from approved list of 4000 level courses in Professional Tracks
Summer Field Studies
(must be taken concurrently)
FOREST 2540Forest Hydrology Field Studies1
FOREST 2541Forest Utilization1
FOREST 2542Forest Measurement and Inventory1
FOREST 2543Forest Ecology Field Studies1
FOREST 2544Introduction to Silviculture and Management1
FOREST 2545Forest Management Planning1
Professional Track Courses
(Minimum of 10 courses AND 32 hours required)
Fisheries and Wildlife Core - 5 courses minimum
A. Science and Natural History (must take at least 1 Terrestrial and 1 Aquatic. Only 1 outside F_W)
F_W 2600Ornithology4
F_W 2700Ichthyology4
F_W 3660Mammalogy4
F_W 4100Limnology3-4
BIO_SC 3360Herpetology4
BIO_SC 3710
BIO_SC 3715
Introductory Entomology
and Insect Diversity
5
B. Management - (must take at least 1 Terrestrial and 1 Aquatic)
F_W 2900Principles of Wildlife Management4
F_W 3900Ecology of Fishes3
F_W 4300Fisheries Management3
F_W 4220Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Conservation3
F_W 4400Techniques for Fisheries Management and Conservation4
F_W 4600Ecosystem Management4
C. Specialty Courses (5th course can come from this list or from A or B)
F_W 4220Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Conservation3
F_W 4650Wildlife Management Planning3
F_W 4700Wildlife Research and Management Evaluation Methods4
F_W 3200Aquaculture3
F_W 4200Urban Wildlife Conservation3
F_W 4880Waterfowl Ecology and Management3
International Studies or Study Abroad (approved FW Proposal required)
Forest Core - 15 hours minimum
FOREST 3207Forest Fire Control and Use2
FOREST 3212Forest Health and Protection4
FOREST 3240Wood Technology3
FOREST 3290Urban Forestry2
FOREST 4320Forest Ecology *5
NAT_R 4325Introduction to Geographic Information Systems3
FOREST 4350Forest Economics *3
FOREST 4360Photogrammetry, Inventory and Models3
FOREST 4375Forest Stand Dynamics3
FOREST 4380Forest Resource Management3
FOREST 4390Watershed Management and Water Quality3
The following courses collectively meet the requirements for the SAF accredited Forest Resource Management curriculum:
Forest Fire Control and Use
and Forest Health and Protection
and Wood Technology
and Forest Ecology
and Tree Physiology
and Forest Economics
and Photogrammetry, Inventory and Models
and Forest Resource Management
and Watershed Management and Water Quality
*

Required as a minimum for Forestry Certification if the accredited curriculum has not been completed.

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The School of Natural Resources
302 Anheuser-Busch Natural Resources Building
(573) 882-3436
http://www.snr.missouri.edu/fw/

Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences emphasis areas are part of the degree program in Natural Resources.  They emphasize resource management at organismal, population, or ecosystem scales. An emphasis on resource management helps distinguish our program from basic biology; therefore, course work in fisheries or wildlife management, environmental science, resource policy, or other applied ecology fields is advantageous. The program of study includes communications, quantitative skills, and basic courses in physical and social sciences. Core classes in biology and ecology and specialized courses that feature animal populations and their aquatic and terrestrial environments enhance the learning experience.  Areas of study include wildlife ecology, water quality, habitat management, fisheries science, and conservation biology.

Careers

Graduate studies in fisheries, limnology, conservation biology, or wildlife prepare students for careers with state and federal agencies, consulting firms, private conservation organizations, or academic institutions.

Graduate Certificates

Graduate certificates in conservation biology, college teaching, and geographic information systems (GIS) are available to students who elect to take courses beyond those required for the graduate degree.

Facilities & Resources

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences is housed in the Anheuser-Busch Natural Resources Building. This building provides space for faculty and graduate student offices in close proximity to well-equipped research and teaching laboratories, classrooms, and computer facilities.

Baskett Wildlife Research and Education Center

The Thomas S. Baskett Wildlife Research and Education Area, formerly known as the Ashland Wildlife Research Area, is a 2,252-acre facility located 5 miles east of Ashland, Missouri, on Highway Y. In use since 1938, it has become an integral part of the School of Natural Resources mission of teaching, research, and extension. The Baskett Area is used as an outdoor laboratory for several classes, including dendrology, ornithology, and wildlife research techniques, and has been the source of more than 150 research publications. For more information see http://www.aes.missouri.edu/baskett/index.stm

The Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

The Missouri Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit affiliated with the department is operated through a cooperative agreement among the University of Missouri, the Missouri Department of Conservation, and the United States Geological Survey. It is staffed with two Department of the Interior scientists who are members of the university faculty and who offer graduate-level courses and direct graduate student research.

Vertebrate Collections

The School of Natural Resources also maintains an extensive teaching collection of the vertebrate animals of Missouri, surrounding states, and other countries. The bird and mammal collections contain more than 7,000 specimens. The Glen Smart waterfowl collection consists of more than 200 species of mounted waterfowl of the world. The fish collection contains about 25,000 preserved specimens, including freshwater fishes from Missouri and the Midwest and saltwater fishes from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts.

Funding

Fellowships and teaching and research assistantships are available for most applicants selected for admission. Some programs require an extra form or statement from those who wish to be considered for internal assistantships, fellowships or other funding packages. Check the program website or ask the program contact for details. We require applicants to contact faculty to determine the availability of research assistantships prior to applying to the program.

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F_W 1002: Topics in Fisheries and Wildlife

Organized study of selected topics intended primarily for lower-level students in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences.

Credit Hour: 1-99


F_W 1012: Introduction to Captive Wild Animal Management

(same as AN_SCI 1012). General introduction to housing, husbandry, behavior, genetics, nutrition, reproduction, animal health, and disease control of native and exotic species in zoological parks and other animal conservation facilities; emphasizes the role of captive animals in wildlife conservation. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


F_W 1100: Introductory Zoology with Laboratory

(same as BIO_SC 1100). Introduces important principles and concepts of zoology. Emphasizes cell biology; evolution; genetics; ecology; structure, function, development of the organism.

Credit Hours: 5


F_W 2002: Topics in Fisheries and Wildlife-Biological/Physical/Mathematics

Organized study of selected topics. Intended for lower division Fisheries and Wildlife students. Subjects may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99


F_W 2100: Colloquium in Fisheries and Wildlife

Case studies in the biology and management of fish and wildlife and their environments. Fisheries and Wildlife majors. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1


F_W 2500: Introduction to Genetics and Evolution for Conservation

Basic principles and processes of genetics and evolution and their importance for management and conservation. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: NAT_R 1070, BIO_SC 1500, CHEM 1310, MATH 1100


F_W 2600: Ornithology

(same as BIO_SC 2600). Structure, identification, habits, importance of regional birds. Field work, lectures, lab.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: 5 hours Biological Sciences or instructor's consent


F_W 2700: Ichthyology

(same as BIO_SC 2700). A broad introduction to the biology and ecology of fishes. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the adaptations fishes exhibit to aspects of their environment.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: 8 hours Biological Sciences or equivalent


F_W 2900: Principles of Wildlife Management

Expose students to the principles of wildlife management with emphasis on current issues faced by wildlife researchers and managers in the field. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 4
Recommended: NAT_R 1070 and one other course in biological or environmental science; sophomore standing or higher


F_W 3002: Topics in Fisheries and Wildlife-Biological/Physical/Mathematics

Organized study of selected topics. Intended for upper division students. Subjects and credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99


F_W 3085: Problems in Fisheries and Wildlife

Individual problems studies to supplement regularly organized undergraduate courses in Fisheries and Wildlife. Proposal for problems study must be arranged by student and supervising faculty member prior to registration.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: consent of supervising faculty member


F_W 3090: International Studies in Conservation

International study abroad that enhances and expands conservation knowledge and experience. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hour: 1-5
Prerequisites: 12 hours biological science and/or conservation-related coursework. Restricted to Fisheries and Wildlife majors only
Recommended: 12 hours biological science and/or conservation-related coursework. Must complete a Study Abroad Proposal prior to attending the course


F_W 3200: Aquaculture

This course aims to develop an understanding of key aspects of the practice of fish culture, an awareness of aquatic species being cultured worldwide, and an appreciation of why aquaculture is expanding so rapidly on a global basis and the emerging environmental concerns associated with aquaculture growth. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


F_W 3300: Wildlife Damage Management

To explore wildlife damage conflicts involving human health and safety, agricultural resources, economics and natural resources. The course studies damage caused by wildlife species and methods to alleviate damage. Covers wildlife diseases, human dimensions and wildlife policies. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


F_W 3350: Wildlife Damage Management Lab

To explore wildlife damage management techniques in a field setting. To gain knowledge in assessing wildlife damage and the responsible species and determine the best approach to reduce that damage. Graded on A-F basis only.` Prerequites or

Credit Hour: 1
Corequisites: F_W 3300


F_W 3400: Water Quality and Natural Resource Management

Introduction to broad aspects of water quality science, management and policy. Topics include aquatic ecology, eutrophication, lake and coastal management, water supply and treatment, watershed management with respect to agriculture and urban development, and toxicology.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: CHEM 1310 and NAT_R 1070 or instructor's consent


F_W 3500: Wildlife Conservation in British Cities

Five week study abroad course focusing on approaches to wildlife conservation in London, Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool and Edinburgh. Students will learn how managers blend ecology, conservation, and participatory approaches to management to conserve species in a human dominated landscape. Hands on involvement with conservation projects included.

Credit Hour: 3-6
Prerequisites: NAT_R 1060 or NAT_R 1070, Management course in SNR; instructor's consent


F_W 3600: Introduction to Conservation Biology

Introduction to principles of conservation biology. Application of ecological concepts and conservation biology principles to management of endangered species, biodiversity and threatened ecosystems.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650


F_W 3660: Mammalogy

(same as BIO_SC 3660). Taxonomy, distribution, structure, habits, importance of mammals; emphasizes those of central United States.

Credit Hours: 4
Recommended: junior standing


F_W 3700: Animal Behavior

Behavior allows animals to react promptly to environmental changes, and is how they interact with others and their surroundings. Because behaving is central to an animal's life, knowing about behavior is fundamental to understanding animal ecology and to conservation efforts. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: F_W 1100


F_W 3900: Ecology of Fishes

This course considers fishes' interactions with their environments in relation to survival, growth and population processes. The course is for mid- to upper-level undergraduates interested in fisheries science, management and fish conservation. May be repeated once for credit. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: STAT 2530 or STAT 1400; BIO_SC 1500 or F_W 1100; sophomore standing


F_W 4002: Topics in Fisheries and Wildlife-Biological/Physical/Mathematics

Organized study of selected topics intended primarily for senior-level students in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences.

Credit Hour: 1-99


F_W 4100: Limnology

(same as BIO_SC 4100). (lecture/lab: 4 hrs.; lecture only: 3 hrs.). Ecology of inland waters with emphasis on productivity.

Credit Hour: 3-4
Recommended: senior standing or BIO_SC 3650


F_W 4200: Urban Wildlife Conservation

Reviewing the theory and practice of applying ecological concepts to the management of wildlife species in urban areas.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650


F_W 4220: Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Conservation

Overview of human dimensions approaches and methods as they are applied to issues in fish and wildlife conservation.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: One 3000-level or above professional Fisheries and Wildlife management or techniques course


F_W 4300: Fisheries Management

Introduction to the scientific principles and techniques of fishery management. Integrates ecological principles with social, economic and legal considerations.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: BIO_SC 3650 and STAT 2530


F_W 4400: Techniques for Fisheries Management and Conservation

Introduction to techniques (field and analytical/quantitative) used by fisheries and conservation biologists. Fosters understanding of techniques uses, advantages, limitations biases, and data interpretation. Extended weekly field outings require chest waders and life jackets. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 4
Recommended: BIO_SC 3650 and STAT 2530 or NAT_R 3110 and F_W 2700 or F_W 4300


F_W 4500: Animal Population Dynamics and Management

Quantitative modeling approach to examining principles and analysis techniques of fish and wildlife population dynamics. Emphasis on approaches useful in the management of exploited species.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1400, STAT and BIO_SC 3650


F_W 4600: Ecosystem Management

Explores the development and implementation of large-scale approaches to restoring and maintaining ecosystems for sustainability. Incorporates ecological, socio-economic, and institutional factors that influence natural management agencies. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650


F_W 4650: Wildlife Management Planning

Students will be exposed to various wildlife planning tools. Student teams will develop wildlife management plans with strategic and operational components for current conservation issues in Missouri. Plans will be critiqued by peers and outside professionals. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650 and senior standing; F_W 2900


F_W 4700: Wildlife Research and Management Evaluation Methods

Techniques for conducting wildlife research and evaluating wildlife management practices.

Credit Hours: 4
Recommended: BIO_SC 3650 or F_W 2900 or STAT


F_W 4800: Environmental Toxicology

Introduction to classes of chemicals, tools, methods, and approaches used in environmental toxicology. Emphasizes fundamentals of toxicology, dose-response relationships, evaluation of contaminant issues, strategies, and exposure analysis/toxicity assessment strategies in a risk assessment.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: CHEM 1320 and F_W 3400 or instructor's consent


F_W 4810: Wildlife Disease Ecology

An introduction to the ecology of wildlife diseases. Topics include the definition of a disease, how to measure diseases, impacts on individuals and populations, and the role of disease in wildlife management and conservation.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650


F_W 4880: Waterfowl Ecology and Management

Ecology and management of North American waterfowl and their habitats. Laboratory exercises focus on identification, life histories, sex and age determination, and survey methods. Lectures cover taxonomy, ecology, behavior, population dynamics, harvest management, and habitat management and conservation. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: F_W 2600; BIO_SC 3650; instructor's consent


F_W 4910: Senior Seminar in Captive Wild Animal Management

(same as AN_SCI 4910). Investigates key issues in captive wild animal management, focusing on the role of animal caretakers in addressing the issues. Students are required to formulate informed opinions regarding these topics and communicate effectively about the subject matter. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: AN_SCI 1012 or F_W 1012; junior or senior standing


F_W 4940: Fisheries and Wildlife Internship

Supervised professional experience with an approval public or private organization. May be repeated for credit. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-12
Prerequisites: Fisheries and Wildlife majors only


F_W 4950: Undergraduate Research in Fisheries and Wildlife

Individually directed field or laboratory research for students under faculty supervision. Project must be arranged by student and faculty member prior to registration.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: consent of supervising faculty member


F_W 4960: Special Readings in Fisheries and Wildlife

Critical review of current literature and research in fisheries and wildlife sciences. Project must be arranged by student and faculty supervisor prior to registration.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: supervising faculty member's consent required


F_W 7002: Graduate Topics in Fisheries and Wildlife

Organized study of selected topics intended primarily for graduate students in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-99


F_W 7100: Limnology

(same as BIO_SC 7100). (lecture/lab: 4 hrs.; lecture only: 3 hrs.) Ecology of inland waters with emphasis on productivity.

Credit Hour: 3-4
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650


F_W 7200: Urban Wildlife Conservation

Reviewing the theory and practice of applying ecological concepts to the management of wildlife species in urban areas.

Credit Hours: 3
Corequisites: BIO SC 3650 or instructor's consent


F_W 7220: Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Conservation

Overview of human dimensions approaches and methods as they are applied to issues in fish and wildlife conservation.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: One 3000-level or above professional management or techniques course or instructor consent


F_W 7300: Fisheries Management

Introduction to the scientific principles and techniques of fishery management. Integrates ecological principles with social, economic and legal considerations.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650 and STAT 2530


F_W 7400: Techniques for Fisheries Management and Conservation

Introduction to techniques (field and analytical/quantitative) used by fisheries and conservation biologists. Fosters understanding of techniques uses, advantages, limitations biases, and data interpretation. Extended weekly field outings require chest waders and life jackets.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650 and STAT 2530 or NAT_R 3110 and F_W 2700 or F_W 4300


F_W 7500: Animal Population Dynamics and Management

Quantitative modeling approach to examining principles and analysis techniques of fish and wildlife population dynamics. Emphasis on approaches useful in the management of exploited species. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1400, BIO_SC 3650, Statistics


F_W 7600: Ecosystem Management

Explores the development and implementation of large-scale approaches to restoring and maintaining ecosystems for sustainability. Incorporates ecological, social-economic, and institutional factors that influence natural resource management agencies. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 4


F_W 7700: Wildlife Research and Management Techniques

Research and Management methods for wildlife populations and habitats.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650 and STAT 2530 or NAT_R 3110. One-week pre-semester field session required


F_W 7800: Environmental Toxicology

Introduction to classes of chemicals, tools, methods, and approaches used in environmental toxicology. Emphasizes fundamentals of toxicology, dose-response relationships, evaluation of contaminant issues, strategies, and exposure analysis/toxicity assessment strategies in a risk assessment.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: CHEM 1320 and F_W 3400 or instructor's consent


F_W 7810: Wildlife Disease Ecology

An introduction to the ecology of wildlife diseases. Topics include the definition of a disease, how to measure diseases, impacts on individuals and populations, and the role of disease in wildlife management and conservation.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


F_W 7880: Waterfowl Ecology and Management

Ecology and Management of North American waterfowl and their habitats. Laboratory exercises focuses on identification, life histories, sex and age determination, and survey methods. Lectures cover taxonomy, ecology, behavior, population dynamics, harvest management, and habitat management and conservation. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: F_W 2600; BIO_SC 3650; instructor's consent


F_W 8001: Topics in Fisheries and Wildlife

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


F_W 8050: Non-Thesis Research in Fisheries and Wildlife

Independent research not leading to a thesis.

Credit Hour: 1-99


F_W 8085: Graduate Problems in Fisheries and Wildlife

Individualized problems studies to supplement regularly organized graduate courses in Fisheries and Wildlife.

Credit Hour: 1-5
Prerequisites: consent of supervising faculty member


F_W 8087: Masters Seminar in Fisheries and Wildlife

Discussions of current developments in forestry, fisheries and wildlife, and critical study of research programs.

Credit Hour: 1


F_W 8090: Masters Thesis Research in Fisheries and Wildlife

Research leading to a thesis or dissertation. Graded on a S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-99


F_W 8300: Professional Development and Communications

Intended to foster professional growth and development of graduate students. The course will present a rigorous introduction to professionalism, ethics, career development, and professional communications skills and techniques. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-3


F_W 8440: Fish Ecology

Advanced study of the interactions between fish and their environment. Topics include behavioral, physiological, population and community ecology of fishes, with emphasis on development and application of ecological theory in fishery management.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: F_W 2700, F_W 4100, BIO_SC 3650 or equivalent


F_W 8450: Advanced Limnology

Physical, chemical and biological processes of lakes and streams emphasizing biological production, water quality and modern problems. Field, laboratory techniques in limnology research.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: F_W 4100, BIO_SC 3650, BIO_SC 3510 or equivalent


F_W 8460: Wetland Ecology

A survey of the wetlands of North America; emphasis on nutrient dynamics, habitat structure, management, legislation and regulations, and man's impacts.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: F_W 4100, BIO_SC 3650 and instructor's consent


F_W 8470: Fish Bioenergetics: Concepts and Applications

Key concepts of fish bioenergetics are treated by readings, discussions of articles and lectures by the instructor. Concepts are applied through modeling. Novel applications, shortcomings and benefits of bioenergetics models are treated. The course applies to graduate students seeking careers in fisheries management, aquatic ecology, fish conservation and aquaculture. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


F_W 8510: Ecology, Conservation, and Environmental Justice

The goal of this course is to introduce graduate students in natural resource management and conservation biology to the ecological and management concepts that underlie environmental justice issues, and to explain how broader environmental justice concepts are relevant to natural resource and conservation fields. Graded on A-F basis only. Prerequisites: one undergraduate course from the following list of disciplines: ecology, natural resource management, conservation biology, sociology or equivalent.

Credit Hours: 2


F_W 8520: Stream Ecology

Ecological principles applied to flowing waters. Emphasis on ecological processes within algal, invertebrate and fish communities. The influence of geomorphic processes, hydrologic principles and physical-chemical factors on the biota.

Credit Hours: 3


F_W 8530: Quantitative Fish and Wildlife Assessment

Methods to assess space use patterns, animal abundance and population status are drawn into quantitative framework for making inferences to wild populations. Practical application and limitations of techniques are emphasized through analysis and interpretation of field data.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: NAT_R 3110 or equivalent


F_W 8540: Wildlife Nutritional Ecology

A comprehensive and comparative treatment of vertebrates interact with their environment to satisfy nutrient and energy requirements. Emphasis on nutrient requirements, food processing, bioenergetics and foraging strategies.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 3650 or instructor's consent


F_W 8550: Advanced Waterfowl Ecology

Advance studies of waterfowl ecology. Emphasis on mating systems, foraging ecology, energetics, and post-breeding and wintering ecology.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: F_W 2600, F_W 3800 and BIO_SC 3650 or instructor's consent


F_W 8620: Vertebrate Behavioral Ecology

In-depth study of the behavioral adaptations of vertebrates. Topics include reproductive strategies, mate selection, parental care, predator avoidance, habitat selection, foraging strategies and spacing patterns.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 4640 and BIO_SC 3650 or equivalents


F_W 9087: PhD Seminar in Fisheries and Wildlife

Discussions of current developments in forestry, fisheries and wildlife, and critical study of research programs.

Credit Hour: 1


F_W 9090: Ph. D. Dissertation Research in Fisheries and Wildlife

Research leading to a thesis or dissertation. Graded on a S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-99