Forestry

H. E. Stelzer
Department of Forestry
The School of Natural Resources
College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
203 Anheuser-Busch Natural Resources Building
(573) 882-7242
SNR@missouri.edu

The forestry undergraduate major is based on a foundation of communication, analytical science, humanities and professional courses that provides students with prerequisites for additional professional courses as well as a basic liberal education. Four emphasis areas are offered: forest resource management, urban forestry, forest resource entrepreneurship and business, and individualized studies.

The department offers a BSF degree in Forestry, MS and PhD degrees in Natural Resources with emphasis in Forestry. A minor is also available.

Professor H. S. He**, S. Jose**, D. R. Larsen*, R. M. Muzika**
Associate Professor F. X. Aguilar**, J. A. Hubbart**, H. E. Stelzer**
Assistant Professor B. O. Knapp**
Research Professor M. A. Gold**, R. P. Guyette**
Research Assistant Professor M. V. Coggeshall**, C. H. Lin**, M. C. Stambaugh**
Cooperative Associate Professor D. Dey*, J. Van Sambeek**, S. R. Shifley*
Adjunct Assistant Professor J. Kabrick**

*

Graduate Faculty Member - membership is required to teach graduate-level courses, chair master's thesis committees, and serve on doctoral examination and dissertation committees.

**

Doctoral Faculty Member - membership is required to chair doctoral examination or dissertation committees.  Graduate faculty membership is a prerequisite for Doctoral faculty membership.

BSF in Forestry

Forestry is the science, art, and craft of creating, managing, using, conserving, and repairing forests and associated resources, in a sustainable manner, to meet desired societal goals. The challenge of forestry is to create systems that are socially accepted while sustaining the resources and any other resources that might be affected. Forestry has elements that belong to the biological, physical, social, political and managerial sciences. Forest ecosystems have come to be seen as the most important component of the biosphere and forestry has emerged as a vital applied science, craft, and technology.

Graduates work in an ever-expanding breadth of jobs related to the conservation and management of forests and other renewable natural resources in the United States and beyond. From urban, private and industrial forests to conservation easements and wilderness tracks, managers are needed to guide the use and sustainability of our nation's natural resources.

Studies in this discipline provide a broad exposure to the biological and physical sciences, from the study of water systems (hydrology), forest ecology, tree physiology and insects and disease (entomology and pathology) to forest soils, geology, and microclimatology.

Honors

Students who graduate with the following cumulative GPA values are awarded BSF degrees with Latin honors:

3.50-3.69 cum laude
3.70-3.89 magna cum laude
>3.90 summa cum laude

Dual Major - Forestry/Fisheries and Wildlife

In addition to courses that satisfy university general education requirements, students who plan to complete a dual major in fisheries and wildlife/forestry must complete the required fisheries and wildlife sciences, forestry, and elective options to reach 140 credits. The dual major does not allow for any general elective hours.

Major Core Requirements
Science Core
CHEM 1100Atoms and Molecules with Lab3
BIOCHM 2110The Living World: Molecular Scale3
CHEM 1320College Chemistry I4
Physics (select one)2-5
College Physics I
Introductory Meteorology
Principles of Geology with Laboratory
Introduction to Soils
Soil Science Laboratory
General Botany with Laboratory
General Biology5
Introductory Zoology with Laboratory
Introduction to Biological Systems with Laboratory
Ecology (select one)5
General Ecology
Forest Ecology *
Animal Form/Function course (select one)4-5
Elements of Physiology
Physiology of Domestic Animals
and Physiology of Domestic Animals Laboratory
Animal Physiology
Introduction to Cell Biology
Genetics (select one)3-4
Introduction to Genetics and Evolution for Conservation
General Genetics
Genetics of Agricultural Plants and Animals
Math Sequence
MATH 1100
MATH 1400
STAT 2530
College Algebra
and Calculus for Social and Life Sciences I
and Statistical Methods in Natural Resources
9
Professional Core
NAT_R 1070Ecology and Renewable Resource Management3
F_W 2100Colloquium in Fisheries and Wildlife1
FOREST 2151Dendrology4
Public Speaking (select one)3
Principles of Interpretive Outdoor Recreation
AG_ED_LD 2220Verbal Communication in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources3
Law/Policy (select one)3
Introduction to Environmental Law
Rural and Agricultural Law
Natural Resource Policy/Administration
Water Quality (select one)3
Water Quality and Natural Resource Management
Watershed Management and Water Quality
Introduction to Conservation Biology
Practice of Silviculture
Animal Population Dynamics and Management
Natural Resource Biometrics
Hydrologic Measurement Techniques
CAPSTONE
Summer Field Studies (must be taken concurrently)5
FOREST 2541Forest Utilization1
FOREST 2542Forest Measurement and Inventory1
FOREST 2543Forest Ecology Field Studies1
FOREST 2544Introduction to Silviculture and Management1
FOREST 2545Forest Management Planning1
Professional Track Courses
(Minimum of 10 courses AND 32 hours required)32
Fisheries and Wildlife Core - 5 courses minimum
A. Science and Natural History (must take at least 1 Terrestrial and 1 Aquatic. Only 1 outside F W)
Ornithology
Ichthyology
Mammalogy
Limnology
Herpetology
Introductory Entomology
and Insect Diversity
B. Management - (must take at least 1 Terrestrial and 1 Aquatic)
Ecology of Fishes
Fisheries Management
Techniques for Fisheries Management and Conservation
Ecosystem Management
Wildlife Research and Management Evaluation Methods
C. Specialty Courses (5th course can come from this list or from A or B)
Aquaculture
Urban Wildlife Conservation
Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Conservation
International Studies or Study Abroad [approved F W Proposal required]1-8
Forest Core - 15 credits minimum from the following courses (additional courses accepted with approval):
Forest Fire Control and Use
Forest Health and Protection
Wood Technology
Urban Forestry
Forest Ecology
Forest Economics
Photogrammetry, Inventory and Models
Forest Stand Dynamics
Forest Resource Management
Watershed Management and Water Quality
Total Credits101-113
*

Required as a minimum for Forestry Certification if the accredited curriculum has not been completed.

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School of Natural Resources
Department of Forestry
203 Anheuser-Busch Natural Resources Building
(573) 882-7242
http://snr.missouri.edu/forestry/academics/graduate-program.php

Director of Graduate Studies: Hong He

Forestry encompasses both basic and applied science, involving specific interests ranging from biophysical processes in forested ecosystems to plant population studies, but also recognizes overarching fundamental issues of sustainability of natural resources. Forestry graduate education prepares students for opportunities in a variety of disciplines such as forest ecology, tree physiology, hydrology, conservation, policy and silviculture.

Degrees and Areas of Study

Graduate research programs in the Department of Forestry lead to an MS or PhD in Natural Resources with an emphasis in Forestry. Specialized graduate education can focus on, but is not limited to, studies in agroforestry, biometrics, community and landscape ecology, dendrochronology, economics, entomology, fire ecology, hydrology, physiological ecology, physiology, policy, silviculture, soils, forest management, stand dynamics, water quality and wood quality.

Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificates

In collaboration with other departments, additional graduate certificates are available in
Conservation Biology http://gradstudies.missouri.edu/academics/programs/conservation-biology-graduate-certificate/
Geographic Information Sciences http://www.geog.missouri.edu/?q=grad/graduate-gis-program.
Interdisciplinary certificates are intended for students who elect to take courses beyond those required for our graduate degrees.

Partnerships

The graduate program in the Department of Forestry involves partnerships with the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, the US Geological Survey, the National Park Service and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Students may work closely with scientists in these agencies who have affiliated faculty appointments.

Career Opportunities

A graduate degree in Natural Resources with an emphasis in Forestry is designed to prepare students for careers in academic institutions, consulting firms, non-governmental organizations, industry and state and federal agencies.

Facilities and Resources

Facilities available for research include well-equipped biometrics, ecology, dendrochronology, hydrology, physiology and wood quality laboratories in the Anheuser-Busch Natural Resources Building on campus at Columbia, the Horticultural and Agroforestry Research Center (HARC) and the Baskett Research and Education Area.

Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center (HARC). HARC is a 540-acre tract about 30 miles northwest of campus near New Franklin, Mo. It is in the loess hills overlooking the Missouri River Valley and is well-suited for agroforestry, agronomic and horticultural field studies.

Baskett Research Area. Thomas Baskett Wildlife Research and Education Area, formerly known as the Ashland Wildlife Research Area, is a 2,252-acre facility located five miles east of Ashland, Missouri. In use since 1938, Baskett has become an integral part of the School of Natural Resources mission of teaching, research, and extension. The Baskett Research Area is used as an outdoor laboratory for several classes including dendrology, forest ecology, ornithology, and wildlife research techniques, and has been the source of over 150 research publications. For more information see http://www.aes.missouri.edu/baskett/

Schnabel Woods. The Schnabel Arboretum Tract is an 80-acre tract of late-successional forest on the bluffs near the Missouri River. It is located eight miles southwest of the MU campus near the river community of McBaine, adjacent to the Missouri Department of Conservation Eagle Bluff Conservation Area and the cross-state Katy Trail State Park. The Schnabel Tract represents a unique, relatively undisturbed example of a river-hills forest ecosystem complex not commonly found in Missouri. The area is used for undergraduate instruction, graduate research and demonstration.

University Forest. University Forest is located at the southeastern edge of the Missouri Ozarks, 14 miles north of Poplar Bluff and near Lake Wappapello. It is uniquely situated at the junction of two major ecological sections of the state: The Ozarks and the Mississippi Alluvial Basin. Three forest ecosystem types converge near this area: upland oak-hickory, oak-shortleaf pine and bottomland hardwoods. Using the adjacent 7,000-acre University State Forest managed by the Missouri Department of Conservation, this area is used routinely by the faculty and students of the School of Natural Resources for research.

Additional Locations. In addition, lands of the United States Forest Service, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Corps of Engineers, National Park Service, Missouri Department of Conservation and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources are available for certain research activities. Numerous research projects have also taken place on private lands.

Funding

Some programs require an extra form or statement from those who wish to be considered for internal assistantships, fellowships or other funding packages. Check the program Web site or ask the program contact for details. A limited number of research assistantships are available. They are awarded based on (1.) demonstrated scholastic accomplishment; (2.) GRE scores; and (3.) experience related to the proposed field of study.

Application and Admission Information

Admission Contact Information
Dr. Hong He
203 ABNR Bldg.
HeH@missouri.edu

Admission Criteria

Fall deadline: May 15
Spring deadline: October 15
Summer deadline: March 15

  • Minimum GPA: 3.0 in last 60 hours
  • Minimum TOEFL scores:
Internet-based test (iBT) Paper-based test (PBT)
80 550
  • Minimum GRE scores:
When did you take the GRE? Verbal + Quantitative
Prior to August 1, 2011 1100
On or After August 1, 2011 300
*

50th percentile or higher preferred in each category.

Particular attention is given to the record of the last 2 years of undergraduate study, and/or the type and quality of professional experience since completion of the undergraduate degree. Doctoral candidates must demonstrate a higher level of achievement in each of these criteria.

Required Application Materials

To the Office of Graduate Studies:

  • All required documents
  • 3 letters of recommendation from individuals qualified to evaluate scholarly capacity and professional qualities
  • Letter of intent

To the Program:

  • Departmental application (use form)
  • GRE scores

FOREST 1102: Topics in Forestry - Biological/Physical/Mathematical

Organized study of selected topics in forestry. Intended for undergraduate students.

Credit Hour: 1-3


FOREST 1104: Topics in Forestry - Social Science

Organized study of selected topics in forestry. Intended for undergraduate students.

Credit Hour: 1-3


FOREST 2151: Dendrology

An introduction to the biology of trees, emphasizing identification in the field, taxonomy, ecology, geographic distribution and economic significance of forest species.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: BIO_SC 1200 or PLNT_S 2120 and PLNT_S 3130


FOREST 2540: Forest Hydrology Field Studies

Introduction to forest hydrology, watershed management, water quantity and quality, climate and biophysical relationships.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: SOIL 2100, FOREST 2151
Corequisites: FOREST 2541, FOREST 2542, FOREST 2543, FOREST 2544 and FOREST 2545


FOREST 2541: Forest Utilization

Field studies of logging and milling of timber.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: SOIL 2100, FOREST 2151
Corequisites: FOREST 2540, FOREST 2542, FOREST 2543, FOREST 2544 and FOREST 2545


FOREST 2542: Forest Measurement and Inventory

Field measurement of standing trees including diameter, height and age. Estimation of forest timber resources using a variety of sampling schemes and techniques. Introduction to Arcview and growth models.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: SOIL 2100, FOREST 2151
Corequisites: FOREST 2540, FOREST 2541, FOREST 2543, FOREST 2544 and FOREST 2545


FOREST 2543: Forest Ecology Field Studies

Field studies of vegetation, soils, habitats and ecological units. Application of ecological principles of natural resource management and understanding of natural and managed forested communities with an emphasis on southeastern Missouri.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: SOIL 2100, FOREST 2151
Corequisites: FOREST 2540, FOREST 2541, FOREST 2542, FOREST 2544 and FOREST 2545


FOREST 2544: Introduction to Silviculture and Management

Management objectives and stand prescriptions, regeneration and intermediate silvicultural treatments, management on private and federal forest lands, tree evaluation and timber marking.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: SOIL 2100, FOREST 2151
Corequisites: FOREST 2540, FOREST 2541, FOREST 2542, FOREST 2543 and FOREST 2545


FOREST 2545: Forest Management Planning

Preparation and presentation of a written forest management plan using material and data developed in prerequisite courses.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: SOIL 2100, FOREST 2151
Corequisites: FOREST 2540, FOREST 2541, FOREST 2542, FOREST 2543 and FOREST 2544 concurrently


FOREST 3201: Topics in Forestry

Organized study of selected topics. Intended primarily for undergraduate Forestry students. Subjects and credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99


FOREST 3207: Forest Fire Control and Use

Fundamentals of all phases of fire protection. Objectives and techniques in use of fire.

Credit Hours: 2


FOREST 3212: Forest Health and Protection

Fundamental concepts of forest pathology and forest entomology including emphasis on ecological principles and management strategies.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: FOREST 2151


FOREST 3217: Fire and Society

A study of the relationship between society (humans) and fire. What kind of role does fire play in day-to-day life? How has fire influenced our behavior since Day 1? How do we view fire today?

Credit Hours: 2


FOREST 3240: Wood Technology

Structure and identification of commercial woods. Relation of growth to physical and chemical properties of wood.

Credit Hours: 3


FOREST 3290: Urban Forestry

The culture and management of trees in urban areas, including ownership patterns, species composition, growth environment, amenities provided and evaluation. One-day field trip required.

Credit Hours: 2
Prerequisites: FOREST 2151 or PLNT_S 2210, or instructor's consent


FOREST 3300: Problems in Forestry

Problems in Forestry

Credit Hour: 1-99


FOREST 3350: Special Readings in Forestry

Critical review of current literature and research in forestry, fisheries and wildlife, and methods of presenting research results.

Credit Hour: 1-99


FOREST 4301: Topics in Forestry

Organized study of selected topics. Intended for upper-division students. Subjects and credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hours: 3


FOREST 4320: Forest Ecology

Principles of community, ecosystem, and population ecology and examination of the influence of environmental factors and human activity on forest dynamics, composition, structure and function.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: Senior standing only. Recommended FOREST 2151


FOREST 4330: Practice of Silviculture

Applied ecological principles, cultural practices, tree improvement techniques and treatments to forest stands and other lands for systematic production of goods and services.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4320; Senior standing only


FOREST 4340: Tree Physiology

Lectures on physical and chemical phenomena involved in the functions and activities of trees.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOCHM 2110, BIO_SC 1200, CHEM 1100; or instructor's consent


FOREST 4350: Forest Economics

Economic principles applied to production/marketing of goods and services from forest land: emphasizes capital and land factors and investment alternatives related to time.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Mathematics requirement completed; AG_EC 1042, or AG_EC 2070


FOREST 4360: Photogrammetry, Inventory and Models

Applied course in the area of aerial photogrammetry, forest inventory, and forest growth models for developing, maintaining, and utilizing these tools in a forest management.

Credit Hours: 3


FOREST 4365: Logging Systems: Operations and Analyses

A systems approach to timber harvesting from acquisition through engineering to log transport. Regional aspects and influences will be considered.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 2540, FOREST 2541


FOREST 4370: Wildland Fire Management

Management, administration, and organization of wildland and prescribed fires and other natural and man-made disasters. Emphasis placed on organizational arrangements of incidents rather than on either strategy or tactics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 3207 or equivalent


FOREST 4375: Forest Stand Dynamics

Examines the development of forest structure, the role of disturbance on forest change and the use of this knowledge in applying silvicultural systems. Both forest stand dynamics theories, structure diagrams, forest growth models, and long term data sets are used to understand stand dynamics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4330 or instructor's consent


FOREST 4380: Forest Resource Management

Teaches resource managers how to develop a plan for the management of forest resources using managerial, economic, silvical and wildlife techniques for its enhancement and to meet the landowner's objectives.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4330 and FOREST 4350; Senior Standing only


FOREST 4385: Agroforestry I: Theory, Practice and Adoption

Understand biophysical, ecological, social and economic features of temperate and tropical agroforestry. Covers the basics of design, planning and implementation of agroforestry practices.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


FOREST 4387: Agroforestry Economics and Policy

This course focuses on economic principles applied to the adoption and management of agroforestry practices at both the micro and macro scale. This includes cost and benefits analysis of ecosystem services and marketing of goods and services from agroforestry. More specifically, this course emphasizes both market and nonmarket valuation of managed tree and crop/livestock interactions; investment alternatives related to economics and natural resources; and decision making with relation to financial principles, environmental principles, and social principles. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4385 or FOREST 7385, AG_EC 1041 or permission of instructor


FOREST 4390: Watershed Management and Water Quality

Hydrologic processes on wildland watersheds. Effects of forest land management on streamflow, erosion and water quality.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1400; Senior standing only


FOREST 4940: Forestry Internship

Supervised professional experience with an approved public or private organization. May be repeated for credit. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-12
Prerequisites: Instructor's consent required


FOREST 4950: Forestry Undergraduate Research

Research apprenticeship with a faculty mentor. Students are expected to develop initial concept for the research, design experiments, collect data, and analyze data with faculty input, oversight, and guidance. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-4
Prerequisites: Senior standing, STAT 2530


FOREST 4960: Special Readings in Forestry

Individualized study on particular topic in forestry. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-4
Prerequisites: Senior standing required


FOREST 4994: Senior Honors Research in Forestry


Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: Instructor Consent Required


FOREST 4995: Senior Honors Research in Forestry


Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: 3.30 GPA and instructor's consent


FOREST 7301: Topics in Forestry

Organized study of selected topics. Intended for upper-division and graduate students. Subjects and credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99


FOREST 7320: Forest Ecology

Principles of community, ecosystem, and population ecology and examination of the influence of environmental factors and human activity on forest dynamics, composition, structure and function.

Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: FOREST 2151 or BIO_SC 3210 or instructor's consent


FOREST 7330: Practice of Silviculture

Applied ecological principles, cultural practices, tree improvement techniques and treatments to forest stands and other lands for systematic production of goods and services.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4320


FOREST 7340: Tree Physiology

Lectures on physical and chemical phenomena involved in the functions and activities of trees.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BIOCHM 2110; BIO_SC 1200; CHEM 1100; or instructor's consent


FOREST 7350: Forest Economics

Economic principles applied to production/marketing of goods and services from forest land: emphasizes capital and land factors and investment alternatives related to time.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Mathematics requirement completed; AG_EC 1041, or AG_EC 3080


FOREST 7360: Photogrammetry, Inventory and Models

Applied course in the area of aerial photogrammetry, forest inventory, and forest growth models for developing, maintaining, and utilizing these tools in a forest management.

Credit Hours: 3


FOREST 7365: Logging Systems: Operations and Analysis

A systems approach to timber harvesting from acquisition through engineering to log transport. Regional aspects and influences will be considered.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 2543 and FOREST 2544


FOREST 7370: Wildland Fire Management

Management, administration, and organization of wildland and prescribed fires and other natural and man-made disasters. Emphasis placed on organizational arrangements of incidents rather than on either strategy or tactics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 3207 or equivalent


FOREST 7375: Forest Stand Dynamics

Examines the development of forest structure, the role of disturbance on forest change and the use of this knowledge in applying silvicultural systems. Both forest stand dynamics theories, structure diagrams, forest growth models, and long term data sets are used to understand stand dynamics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4330 or instructor's consent


FOREST 7380: Forest Resource Management

Teaches resource managers how to develop a plan for the management of forest resources using managerial, economic, silvical and wildlife techniques for its enhancement and to meet the landowner's objectives.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4330 and FOREST 4350


FOREST 7385: Agroforestry I: Theory, Practice and Adoption

Understand biophysical, ecological social and economic features of temperate and tropical agroforestry. Covers the basics of design, planning and implementation of agroforestry practices.

Credit Hours: 3


FOREST 7390: Watershed Management and Water Quality

Hydrologic processes on wildland watersheds. Effects of forest land management on streamflow, erosion and water quality.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1400 or instructor's consent


FOREST 8050: Research in Forestry

Original research not leading to preparation of dissertation.

Credit Hour: 1-99


FOREST 8090: Masters Thesis Research in Forestry

Original investigation for presentation in a M.S. thesis. Graded on a S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-10


FOREST 8385: Ecological Principles of Agroforestry

The course prepares students to develop an understanding of the complexity of agroforestry. Students will critically analyze classical and contemporary ecological theories and apply them in designing agroforestry practices to solve complex production and environmental issues. May be repeated for credit. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4385 or FOREST 7385 or permission of instructor


FOREST 8390: Physical Hydrology

Students will obtain an understanding of hydrologic processes in terms of the occurrence, distribution and movement of water spanning the atmosphere and lithosphere. Students will have an opportunity to develop an understanding of physical processes governing mass and energy flux in wildland and anthropogenic systems. May be repeated for credit. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: College Physics and Calculus I


FOREST 8401: Topics in Forestry

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


FOREST 8430: Applied Silviculture

Ecological and economic factors affecting application of silviculture in each of eighteen forest regions in United States.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4330


FOREST 8450: Forest Soils

Physical, chemical and biological properties of forest soils in relation to tree growth.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4330 or instructor's consent


FOREST 8460: Advanced Forest Ecology

Lecture/discussion based course emphasizing contemporary and classic ecological studies and concepts in the context of current forest ecology issues and research. Prerequisites: undergraduate ecology course

Credit Hours: 3


FOREST 8490: Advanced Forest Management

Modern quantitative methods to facilitate decision-making in harvest scheduling and regulation, land use allocation, and production planning in natural resource management.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4380


FOREST 8515: Advanced Forest Biometrics

An introduction to the topics and philosophy of ecological modeling. The course will guide students through the process of developing a conceptual model, formalizing the model, formulating, parameterizing, and running the model as well as analyzing the results.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: STAT 7070 or instructor's consent


FOREST 8520: Social Forestry

Issues with using forestry as an international development tool; planning, implementing and evaluating farm and community forestry projects.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FOREST 4350, or AG_EC 3270, or equivalent and instructor's consent


FOREST 8530: Ecosystem Management: The Human Dimension

Overview of cultural, social, political and economic dimensions of natural resource problems and issues from an ecologically grounded management perspective.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: NAT_R 4353 or equivalent


FOREST 8540: Tree Growth-Quality Relationships

Response of tree growth (wood formation) to such environmental influences fertilization, moisture, nutrient supply, wounding pruning, etc.

Credit Hours: 3


FOREST 8620: Plant-Water Relations

Absorption, translocation, utilization and loss of water by plants . Biophysics of water movement in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Effects of water deficits on physiological processes.

Credit Hours: 3


FOREST 8625: Plant-Water Relations Laboratory

Introduction to techniques and instrumentation used in studies of plant-water relations.

Credit Hours: 2
Corequisites: FOREST 8620


FOREST 9087: Seminar in Forestry

Discussions of current developments in Forestry, and critical study of research programs. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1


FOREST 9090: Dissertation Research in Forestry

Original investigation for presentation in a doctoral dissertation. Graded on a S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-10


FOREST 9410: Seminar in Forestry

Discussions of current developments in Forestry, and critical study of research programs.

Credit Hour: 1