Russian

Tim Langen, Chair
College of Arts and Science
451 Strickland Hall
(573) 882-4328
grs@missouri.edu

The Department of German and Russian Studies offers courses in German and Russian language, literature, film and civilization. It also offers instruction in Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Hebrew and Korean. Many courses, such as civilization, culture, literature in translation and film courses, do not require knowledge of a foreign language.

The department offers the Bachelor of Arts with majors in German, and in Russian, and the Master of Arts in German, and in Russian and Slavonic Studies. The department also offers minors in German, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Many courses in the minor in East Asian Studies are taught in the Department of German and Russian Studies. The Film Studies program is also housed in the department.

Professor G. Barabtarlo*
Associate Professor  T. Langen*
Assistant Professor M. Kelly*
Associate Teaching Professor N. Monnier*

Dual Degrees and Double Majors

As a double major or a dual degree has become an ever more popular choice, an increasing number of students choose German or Russian as one of their majors. Students looking forward to a career in medicine or in the sciences use a double major to ensure a thorough background in the humanities to balance their scientific studies. Double majors within the College of Arts and Science can be arranged and, if the second degree program is identified early, dual degree programs outside the college are also possible. Combined programs with journalism, international studies, education and business are frequent choices. Within the college, combinations with political science, history, philosophy, art history, and the sciences are popular double major programs.

Departmental Honors - Russian

Departmental honors are available for students majoring in Russian with a minimum 3.3 GPA. A three-course literature sequence must be completed with no grades below B or, at the discretion of the department, a thesis paper may be written.

Beginning Fall 2013: Departmental Honors are available for student majoring in Russian with a minimum 3.5 GPA in the Russian major and 3.3 GPA overall. Students must complete a minimum of three literature courses, two of which must be at the 4000 level, with no grades below a B. At the discretion of the department, students may write a thesis paper in lieu of one of the 4000 level literature courses.

College of Arts and Science
451 Strickland Hall
(573) 882-4328
https://grs.missouri.edu/

Director of Graduate Studies: Gene Barabtarlo

 The Master of Arts program in Russian and Slavonic Studies offers advanced study in the literature and culture of Russia. Course offerings are primarily in literature, but reflect a variety of interrelated fields, including religion, philology, intellectual history, and philosophy. In two years of coursework students receive training in the theory and history of Russian literature and culture in general, as well as an introduction to the history of the language.

Careers

Students may go on to careers in a number of fields, including government work and international business; they will also be prepared to continue their studies at the doctoral level.

Facilities and Resources

The library of the University of Missouri is particularly strong in Russian history and literature. We are also part of a consortium that provides quick access to the holdings of many other major academic and public libraries.

Financial Support

In this program, qualified graduate students may have the opportunity to work as teaching assistants in language, literature or civilization courses. Incoming graduate students are normally offered paid positions as Teaching Assistants. To be eligible for a teaching assistantship, your application must be received by March 1. Teaching assistants (TAs) are normally appointed for one academic year (two semesters / nine months). The Fall Semester runs from late August to mid-December; the Spring Semester from mid-January to mid-May. TA appointments are normally renewed for the second year of study when teaching and progress toward the degree are satisfactory. Appointments after the second year may be available in special cases, depending upon departmental needs and resources. At present the TA position provides a stipend of approximately $1,000 per month. In addition, tuition for courses taken toward the MA are waived for TAs. Some programs require an extra form or statement from those who wish to be considered for internal assistantships, fellowships or other funding packages. Check the program website or ask the program contact for details.The Graduate School offers several valuable fellowships for which the department may nominate incoming students.

RUSS 1100: Elementary Russian I

Five hours of classroom instruction, with one hour lab work weekly. For beginners with no prior knowledge of Russian.

Credit Hours: 6


RUSS 1200: Elementary Russian II

Five hours of classroom instruction, with one hour lab work weekly.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: C- or better in RUSS 1100 or equivalent. or instructor consent


RUSS 2001: Undergraduate Topics in Russian-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and credits may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 2005: Undergraduate Topics in Russian-Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and credits may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. No language credit.

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 2100: Classics and Iconoclasts: An Introduction to Russian Literature

Designed to introduce students to some of the major genres, issues, and approaches in the study of Russian literature. Begins with the most classic of Russian authors, the so-called "father of Russian literature" Aleksandr Pushkin, then moves on to two "classics" from the 19th century (Gogol, Chekhov) and two "iconoclasts" from the first part of the 20th (Mayakovsky, Kharms). Covers a range of genres, including poetry, short story, and drama, as well as letters, essays and manifestoes. Course reading list includes secondary essays that both shed light on specific texts/authors as well as provide models for critical and theoretical approaches to literature, with an emphasis on Russian Formalism. Readings and discussions in English; no knowledge of Russian language or literature required.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2100W: Classics and Iconoclasts: An Introduction to Russian Literature - Writing Intensive

Designed to introduce students to some of the major genres, issues, and approaches in the study of Russian literature. Begins with the most classic of Russian authors, the so-called "father of Russian literature" Aleksandr Pushkin, then moves on to two "classics" from the 19th century (Gogol, Chekhov) and two "iconoclasts" from the first part of the 20th (Mayakovsky, Kharms). Covers a range of genres, including poetry, short story, and drama, as well as letters, essays and manifestoes. Course reading list includes secondary essays that both shed light on specific texts/authors as well as provide models for critical and theoretical approaches to literature, with an emphasis on Russian Formalism. Readings and discussions in English; no knowledge of Russian language or literature required.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2130: Second-Year Russian I

Students will solidify their command of Russian grammar and begin developing their reading skills.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: RUSS 1200, equivalent, or instructor's consent


RUSS 2160: Second-Year Russian II

Continuation of RUSS 2130.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: RUSS 2130 or equivalent, or instructor's consent


RUSS 2310: Between Heaven and Earth: Russian Civilization

Survey of Russian culture from the Christianization of the Slavic peoples to late imperial period. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2310W: Between Heaven and Earth: Russian Civilization - Writing Intensive

Survey of Russian culture from the Christianization of the Slavic peoples to late imperial period. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2320: The Arts of Survival: Civilization in Soviet Times

Historical, social, and artistic topics. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2320W: The Arts of Survival: Civilization in Soviet Times - Writing Intensive

Historical, social, and artistic topics. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2865: The Art of Soviet and Russian Cinema

(same as FILM_S 2865) Topics (e.g. Distorted Picture: Post-War Cinema in the Soviet State, Cinema in the Soviet Times and Beyond, etc.) announced at time of registration. Only 6 hours may be taken towards major.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2865W: The Art of Soviet and Russian Cinema - Writing Intensive

(same as FILM_S 2865) Topics (e.g. Distorted Picture: Post-War Cinema in the Soviet State, Cinema in the Soviet Times and Beyond, etc.) announced at time of registration. Only 6 hours may be taken towards major.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 3001: Topics in Russian-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


RUSS 3005: Topics in Russian-Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


RUSS 3005W: Topics in Russian-Humanities - Writing Intensive

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


RUSS 3130: Intermediate Russian

Normally taken as 5th semester of Russian language sequence.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in RUSS 2160 or RUSS 3160 or instructor's consent


RUSS 3160: Intermediate Conversation and Composition

Further develops oral command of Russian as well as listening comprehension and some letter writing skills.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in RUSS 2160 or RUSS 3130 or instructor's consent


RUSS 3380: Sinners, Saints, and Madmen: 19th Century Russian Literature

Introduction to foundational periods (Sentimentalism, Romanticism, Realism and its decline), narratives, and authors of 19th century Russian literary tradition. Traces development of the "Russian" short story and novel forms, as well as the all-important "Petersburg" theme.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGLSH 1000; sophomore standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 3390: True Fictions: Russian Prose since 1900

Survey of Russian prose fiction of the twentieth and early twenty-first century. During this time Russia experienced a series of drastic changes in society and culture, and as often happens the artists responded more rapidly and insightfully than anyone else. This was a time of radical experimentation with the very nature of literature, and we will ready and examine some of the fascinating results. Course gives a short history of Russian prose fiction after 1900, offers a theory of analytical reading of imaginative prose, and hones the skills of intelligent writing about evaluative reading. Readings, lecture and discussion in English; no previous knowledge of Russian literature is assumed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing, or instructor's consent


RUSS 3390W: True Fictions: Russian Prose since 1900 - Writing Intensive

Survey of Russian prose fiction of the twentieth and early twenty-first century. During this time Russia experienced a series of drastic changes in society and culture, and as often happens the artists responded more rapidly and insightfully than anyone else. This was a time of radical experimentation with the very nature of literature, and we will ready and examine some of the fascinating results. Course gives a short history of Russian prose fiction after 1900, offers a theory of analytical reading of imaginative prose, and hones the skills of intelligent writing about evaluative reading. Readings, lecture and discussion in English; no previous knowledge of Russian literature is assumed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing, or instructor's consent


RUSS 3630: Russian Classics I

Reading and discussion of selected works by major Russian writers of the nineteenth century. Course conducted in Russian. May be taken before or after RUSS 3640.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: RUSS 3130 or RUSS 3160 or instructor's consent


RUSS 3640: Russian Classics II

Reading and discussion of selected works by major Russian writers of the twentieth century. Course conducted in Russian. May be taken before or after RUSS 3630.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: RUSS 3130 or RUSS 3160 or instructor's consent


RUSS 3890: Russian and Soviet Cinema

(same as FILM_S 3890). Survey and analysis of selected Soviet films. Emphasis on film-making as a form of art. English or subtitled. Second screenings by arr. Some films may run over 2 hrs. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4001: Topics in Russian-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 4005: Topics in Russian-Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. Prerequisites: instructor's consent,

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 4005W: Topics in Russian-Humanities - Writing Intensive

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. Prerequisites: instructor's consent,

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 4160: Advanced Russian Conversation

Advanced syntax, idiomatic constructions, and vocabulary building.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: RUSS 3130 or RUSS 3160 or instructor's consent


RUSS 4350: Special Readings in Russian

Special Readings in Slavic literature or linguistics.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 4420: Russian Poetry

Survey of readings in Russian poetry from its beginnings to present.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4430: Russian Drama

Selected readings in and discussions of major Russian plays of the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4430W: Russian Drama - Writing Intensive

Selected readings in and discussions of major Russian plays of the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4435: Russian Prose

Explores the development of prose writing in modern Russian letters, paying special attention to native generic designations. Considers dual imagery of realist/naturalist and romantic/fantastic approaches. Studies diverse examples: rasskaz (story), the povest' (tale), the novella, novel essay early 19th c. through 20th c. Considers ways in which literature can itself stand as a philosophical form.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4550: Nabokov's Russian Fiction

Systematic analysis of Vladimir Nabokov's fiction, both novels and short stories. Emphasis on the artistic properties of prose. Lectures and class discussion in English. Readings in Russian (English translations for undergraduate students).

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4820: Blogging the World: The Web in Cultural Context

(same as GERMAN 4820. FRENCH 4820). Innovative interdisciplinary course addresses issues of access to international news and specific cultural context working in cross-disciplinary teams. Students in journalism, foreign language, international studies, political science and various other disciplines track cultural developments and information on no-US Web sites, blogs and digital social networks along with exploring various historical forms of communication that preceded the digital era of the Web. Students analyze the potential and limitations/ effects of blogs and the web in specific contemporary cultural contexts and as part of the broader historical evolution of the web. The course is taught in English. The goal of this course is two-fold; students learn the particulars of web blogging, explore various features of the contemporary social network landscape while focusing on the concept of culture, in particular the cultures of Europe and the US. Questions asked are: what is culture? What is common or popular right now in other cultures? And how do new social networks amplify or alter certain features or culture across national and international contests?

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing required


RUSS 4820W: Blogging the World: The Web in Cultural Context - Writing Intensive

(same as GERMAN 4820, FRENCH 4820). Innovative interdisciplinary course addresses issues of access to international news and specific cultural context working in cross-disciplinary teams. Students in journalism, foreign language, international studies, political science and various other disciplines track cultural developments and information on no-US Web sites, blogs and digital social networks along with exploring various historical forms of communication that preceded the digital era of the Web. Students analyze the potential and limitations/ effects of blogs and the web in specific contemporary cultural contexts and as part of the broader historical evolution of the web. The course is taught in English. The goal of this course is two-fold; students learn the particulars of web blogging, explore various features of the contemporary social network landscape while focusing on the concept of culture, in particular the cultures of Europe and the US. Questions asked are: what is culture? What is common or popular right now in other cultures? And how do new social networks amplify or alter certain features or culture across national and international contests?

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing required


RUSS 7085: Problems in Russian and Slavonic Studies

Special problems in Slavic literature or linguistics.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7087: Seminar in Russian

Course content varies.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7105: Topics in 19th Century Russian Literature-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7205: Topics in 20th Century Russian Literature

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7350: Special Readings in Russian


Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7420: Russian Poetry

Survey of readings in Russian poetry from its beginnings to present.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7430: Russian Drama

Selected readings in and discussions of major Russian plays of the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7435: Russian Prose

Explores the development of prose writing in modern Russian letters, paying special attention to native generic designations. Considers dual imagery of realist/naturalist and romantic/fantastic approaches. Studies diverse examples: rasskaz (story), the povest' (tale), the novella, novel essay, early 19th c. through 20th c. Considers ways in which literature can itself stand as a philosophical form.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7550: Nabokov's Russian Fiction

Systematic analysis of Vladimir Nabokov's fiction, both novels and short stories. Emphasis on the artistic properties of prose. Lectures and class discussion in English. Readings in Russian.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7730: Internship in Russian

Supervised introduction to the methodology of the teaching of elementary Russian; conducted in a classroom environment.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 8050: Research in Russian

Translations or creative work not leading to thesis.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8085: Problems in Russian and Slavonic Studies

Special problems in Slavic literature or linguistics.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8090: Thesis Research in Russian

Independent research leading to a Master's thesis. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8220: Russian Intellectual History and Critical Theory I

Survey of Russian literary and cultural criticism of the 18th and 19th centuries. Course texts will include representative critical essays as well as selected literary texts. May be taken before or after RUSS 8230.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 8305: Topics in Slavic Linguistics

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8405: Topics in Slavic Literatures

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8510: The Art and Life of Pushkin

Gives a conceptual thematic overview of Alexander Pushkin's lyrical poetry, as well as some dramatic work and prose. Special attention paid to the parallel development of his artistic and religious beliefs. Poetry read in Russian; prose and dramatic poems in Russian and English.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 8650: Old Church Slavonic

Designed to familiarize student with the phonological system, inflectional morphology and most important literature of the oldest recorded Slavic language. Comparisons of OCS to modern Slavic languages.

Credit Hours: 3