2021-22 Catalogs

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Columbia, MO 65211
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Russian and Slavonic Studies

Andrew Hoberek, Chair
College of Arts and Science
120 Arts and Science Building
(573) 882-1915
sllc@missouri.edu

The Department of German and Russian Studies is now a part of the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. The school offers instruction in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. There are courses in language, culture, civilization, literatures in translation, and film. Many courses, such as civilization, culture, literature in translation, and film courses do not require knowledge of a foreign language.

The school offers the Bachelor of Arts with majors in German and in Russian, and the Master of Arts in German and in Russian Studies.

Associate Professor M. Kelly*
Associate Professor  T. Langen*
Teaching Professor N. Monnier*

The department does not offer an undergraduate degree in Russian and Slavonic Studies.  Please see the Russian program page for undergraduate options. 

College of Arts and Science
120 Arts and Science Building
(573) 882-1915

sllc@missouri.edu

Director of Graduate Studies: Martha Kelly

The Master of Arts program in Russian Studies is a two-year, intensive course of study with emphasis on literature and intellectual history and options for cross-disciplinary coursework. Over two years, students develop a broad knowledge of Russian culture and history, with opportunities for specialized and also comparative research, as well as graduate minors in other fields. They receive careful advising and mentoring to help them develop their study, research, and career goals. Students graduate with strengthened skills in critical thought, research, oral and written communication and intercultural fluency.

Careers

Students may go on to careers in a number of fields, including policy, government work, teaching and international business; they will also be prepared to continue their studies at the doctoral level.

Facilities and Resources

The library of the University of Missouri is particularly strong in Russian literature, history and culture. We are also part of a consortium that provides quick access to the holdings of many other major academic and public libraries.

Financial Support

In this program, qualified graduate students may have the opportunity to work as teaching assistants in language, literature or civilization courses. (Occasionally students may work as Graduate Research Assistants [GRAs].)  Incoming graduate students are normally offered paid positions as Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are normally appointed for one academic year (two semesters/ nine months). The Fall Semester runs from late August to mid-December; the Spring Semester from mid-January to mid-May. GTA appointments are normally renewed for the second year of study when teaching and progress towards the degree are satisfactory.  At present the GTA position provides a stipend of approximately $16,000 per year.  In addition, tuition for courses taken toward the MA are waived for GTAs (and also qualified GRAs). Some programs require an extra form or statement from those who wish to be considered for internal assistantships, fellowships or other funding packages.  Check the program website or ask the program contact for details.   The Graduate School offers several valuable fellowships for which the department may nominate incoming students.   

RUSS 1100: Elementary Russian I

Five hours of classroom instruction, with one hour lab work weekly. For beginners with no prior knowledge of Russian.

Credit Hours: 6


RUSS 1200: Elementary Russian II

Five hours of classroom instruction, with one hour lab work weekly.

Credit Hours: 6
Prerequisites: C- or better in RUSS 1100 or equivalent. or instructor consent


RUSS 2001: Undergraduate Topics in Russian-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and credits may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 2005: Undergraduate Topics in Russian-Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and credits may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. No language credit.

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 2005W: Undergraduate Topics in Russian-Humanities - Writing Intensive

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and credits may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. No language credit.

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 2100: Classics and Iconoclasts: An Introduction to Russian Literature

Designed to introduce students to some of the major genres, issues, and approaches in the study of Russian literature. Begins with the most classic of Russian authors, the so-called "father of Russian literature" Aleksandr Pushkin, then moves on to two "classics" from the 19th century (Gogol, Chekhov) and two "iconoclasts" from the first part of the 20th (Mayakovsky, Kharms). Covers a range of genres, including poetry, short story, and drama, as well as letters, essays and manifestoes. Course reading list includes secondary essays that both shed light on specific texts/authors as well as provide models for critical and theoretical approaches to literature, with an emphasis on Russian Formalism. Readings and discussions in English; no knowledge of Russian language or literature required.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2100W: Classics and Iconoclasts: An Introduction to Russian Literature - Writing Intensive

Designed to introduce students to some of the major genres, issues, and approaches in the study of Russian literature. Begins with the most classic of Russian authors, the so-called "father of Russian literature" Aleksandr Pushkin, then moves on to two "classics" from the 19th century (Gogol, Chekhov) and two "iconoclasts" from the first part of the 20th (Mayakovsky, Kharms). Covers a range of genres, including poetry, short story, and drama, as well as letters, essays and manifestoes. Course reading list includes secondary essays that both shed light on specific texts/authors as well as provide models for critical and theoretical approaches to literature, with an emphasis on Russian Formalism. Readings and discussions in English; no knowledge of Russian language or literature required.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2130: Second-Year Russian I

Students will solidify their command of Russian grammar and begin developing their reading skills.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: RUSS 1200, equivalent, or instructor's consent


RUSS 2160: Second-Year Russian II

Continuation of RUSS 2130.

Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: RUSS 2130 or equivalent, or instructor's consent


RUSS 2310: Between Heaven and Earth: Russian Civilization

Survey of Russian culture from the Christianization of the Slavic peoples to late imperial period. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2310W: Between Heaven and Earth: Russian Civilization - Writing Intensive

Survey of Russian culture from the Christianization of the Slavic peoples to late imperial period. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2320: The Arts of Survival: Civilization in Soviet Times

Historical, social, and artistic topics. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2320W: The Arts of Survival: Civilization in Soviet Times - Writing Intensive

Historical, social, and artistic topics. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2340: Icons and Revolutions: Russia from its Beginnings to Today

A survey of Russian culture and history from the pre-Christian era to the present. Topics will include politics, religion, philosophy, literature, music, and visual art. Classes and readings in English; no prior courses in Russian required. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2340W: Icons and Revolutions: Russia from its Beginnings to Today - Writing Intensive

A survey of Russian culture and history from the pre-Christian era to the present. Topics will include politics, religion, philosophy, literature, music, and visual art. Classes and readings in English; no prior courses in Russian required. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2350: Understanding Russia through Film

How does the Russian-speaking world see itself? Europe and the United States have often viewed Russia as "other," and sometimes as an enemy or a backwards civilization. Some have viewed Russia as an "enigma," soulful and not fit for this world. In this course we will use film to explore how Russian speakers themselves understand Russia. We will watch 14 major Russian-language films from the post-Soviet era (starting in 1991) that depict moments in Russian history from the middle ages to the present. And we will critically consider what these representations of Russian history and culture suggest about Russian identity today. We will pay special attention to how Russian-language films present difference (ethnic, political, religious, gender, sexual, etc.), or "otherness," as a way of defining national identity. And we will analyze the relation of national identity constructs to social inequities. We will consider how films present groups of people within a society as "other"; how films present difference across Russian-speaking nations; and how Russia imagines itself as "other" or as a marginalized outsider. The course may be offered face to face OR in an asynchronous online format. For both versions, assignments will include watching films and responding to them in individual and small-group modes; taking open-book quizzes on brief lectures on Russian history and culture; and collaborating on a final group project to curate and create a webpage for a Russian-language film series. Students will gain foundational knowledge of Russian history and culture; will practice critical thinking through analyzing films in individual and collaborative modes; will develop written and oral communication; and will develop skills in intercultural fluency as they engage with Russian culture in its diversity.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2350W: Understanding Russia through Film - Writing Intensive

How does the Russian-speaking world see itself? Europe and the United States have often viewed Russia as "other," and sometimes as an enemy or a backwards civilization. Some have viewed Russia as an "enigma," soulful and not fit for this world. In this course we will use film to explore how Russian speakers themselves understand Russia. We will watch 14 major Russian-language films from the post-Soviet era (starting in 1991) that depict moments in Russian history from the middle ages to the present. And we will critically consider what these representations of Russian history and culture suggest about Russian identity today. We will pay special attention to how Russian-language films present difference (ethnic, political, religious, gender, sexual, etc.), or "otherness," as a way of defining national identity. And we will analyze the relation of national identity constructs to social inequities. We will consider how films present groups of people within a society as "other"; how films present difference across Russian-speaking nations; and how Russia imagines itself as "other" or as a marginalized outsider. The course may be offered face to face OR in an asynchronous online format. For both versions, assignments will include watching films and responding to them in individual and small-group modes; taking open-book quizzes on brief lectures on Russian history and culture; and collaborating on a final group project to curate and create a webpage for a Russian-language film series. Students will gain foundational knowledge of Russian history and culture; will practice critical thinking through analyzing films in individual and collaborative modes; will develop written and oral communication; and will develop skills in intercultural fluency as they engage with Russian culture in its diversity.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2865: The Art of Soviet and Russian Cinema

(same as FILMS_VS 2865), Topics (e.g. Distorted Picture: Post-War Cinema in the Soviet State, Cinema in the Soviet Times and Beyond, etc.) announced at time of registration. Only 6 hours may be taken towards major.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 2865W: The Art of Soviet and Russian Cinema - Writing Intensive

(same as FILMS_VS 2865). Topics (e.g. Distorted Picture: Post-War Cinema in the Soviet State, Cinema in the Soviet Times and Beyond, etc.) announced at time of registration. Only 6 hours may be taken towards major.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 3001: Topics in Russian-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


RUSS 3005: Topics in Russian-Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


RUSS 3005W: Topics in Russian-Humanities - Writing Intensive

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


RUSS 3130: Intermediate Russian

Normally taken as 5th semester of Russian language sequence.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in RUSS 2160 or RUSS 3160 or instructor's consent


RUSS 3160: Intermediate Conversation and Composition

Further develops oral command of Russian as well as listening comprehension and some letter writing skills.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or higher in RUSS 2160 or RUSS 3130 or instructor's consent


RUSS 3380: Sinners, Saints, and Madmen: 19th Century Russian Literature

Introduction to foundational periods (Sentimentalism, Romanticism, Realism and its decline), narratives, and authors of 19th century Russian literary tradition. Traces development of the "Russian" short story and novel forms, as well as the all-important "Petersburg" theme.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 3380W: Sinners, Saints, and Madmen: 19th Century Russian Literature - Writing Intensive

Introduction to foundational periods (Sentimentalism, Romanticism, Realism and its decline), narratives, and authors of 19th century Russian literary tradition. Traces development of the "Russian" short story and novel forms, as well as the all-important "Petersburg" theme.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGLSH 1000; sophomore standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 3390: True Fictions: Russian Prose since 1900

Survey of Russian prose fiction of the twentieth and early twenty-first century. During this time Russia experienced a series of drastic changes in society and culture, and as often happens the artists responded more rapidly and insightfully than anyone else. This was a time of radical experimentation with the very nature of literature, and we will ready and examine some of the fascinating results. Course gives a short history of Russian prose fiction after 1900, offers a theory of analytical reading of imaginative prose, and hones the skills of intelligent writing about evaluative reading. Readings, lecture and discussion in English; no previous knowledge of Russian literature is assumed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing, or instructor's consent


RUSS 3390W: True Fictions: Russian Prose since 1900 - Writing Intensive

Survey of Russian prose fiction of the twentieth and early twenty-first century. During this time Russia experienced a series of drastic changes in society and culture, and as often happens the artists responded more rapidly and insightfully than anyone else. This was a time of radical experimentation with the very nature of literature, and we will ready and examine some of the fascinating results. Course gives a short history of Russian prose fiction after 1900, offers a theory of analytical reading of imaginative prose, and hones the skills of intelligent writing about evaluative reading. Readings, lecture and discussion in English; no previous knowledge of Russian literature is assumed.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGLSH 1000 and sophomore standing, or instructor's consent


RUSS 3630: Russian Classics I

Reading and discussion of selected works by major Russian writers of the nineteenth century. Course conducted in Russian. May be taken before or after RUSS 3640.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: RUSS 3130 or RUSS 3160 or instructor's consent


RUSS 3640: Russian Classics II

Reading and discussion of selected works by major Russian writers of the twentieth century. Course conducted in Russian. May be taken before or after RUSS 3630.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: RUSS 3130 or RUSS 3160 or instructor's consent


RUSS 3710: Refugee and Migration Studies: A Cultural-Historical Introduction

(same as GERMAN 3710). After the US, Germany and Russia have the world's largest migrant populations. This introduction to refugee and migration studies takes both geographic centers as lenses through which to view key concepts, categories and questions relating to why groups of people move from one region or locality to another. The course is organized by types of migration -- voluntary and involuntary--even as it problematizes this distinction and many others. In particular, we will investigate how migration relates to nation-building and national identity. Topics cover movements in (what are now) Germany and Russia from about 300 CE to the present day. Students will work not only with historiographical and scholarly texts, but also with novels, memoirs, paintings and film to explore the work that cultural representations of migration do.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 3890: Russian and Soviet Cinema

(same as FILMS_VS 3890). Survey and analysis of selected Soviet films. Emphasis on film-making as a form of art. English or subtitled. Second screenings by arr. Some films may run over 2 hrs. No foreign language credit.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4001: Topics in Russian-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-9
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 4005: Topics in Russian-Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. Prerequisites: instructor's consent,

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 4005H: Topics in Russian-Humanities - Honors

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: instructor's consent; Honors eligibility required


RUSS 4005W: Topics in Russian-Humanities - Writing Intensive

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. Prerequisites: instructor's consent,

Credit Hour: 1-3


RUSS 4160: Advanced Russian Conversation

Advanced syntax, idiomatic constructions, and vocabulary building.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: RUSS 3130 or RUSS 3160 or instructor's consent


RUSS 4350: Special Readings in Russian

Special Readings in Slavic literature or linguistics.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 4420: Russian Poetry

(cross-leveled with RUSS 7420). Survey of readings in Russian poetry from its beginnings to present.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4430: Russian Drama

(cross-leveled with RUSS 7430). Selected readings in and discussions of major Russian plays of the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4430W: Russian Drama - Writing Intensive

(cross-leveled with RUSS 7430). Selected readings in and discussions of major Russian plays of the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4435: Russian Prose

(cross-leveled with RUSS 7435). Explores the development of prose writing in modern Russian letters, paying special attention to native generic designations. Considers dual imagery of realist/naturalist and romantic/fantastic approaches. Studies diverse examples: rasskaz (story), the povest' (tale), the novella, novel essay early 19th c. through 20th c. Considers ways in which literature can itself stand as a philosophical form.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4440: The Russian Novel

(cross-leveled with RUSS 7440). Selected readings and seminar discussion of major novelists of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4550: Nabokov's Russian Fiction

(cross-leveled with RUSS 7550). Systematic analysis of Vladimir Nabokov's fiction, both novels and short stories. Emphasis on the artistic properties of prose. Lectures and class discussion in English. Readings in Russian (English translations for undergraduate students).

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


RUSS 4820: Blogging the World: The Web in Cultural Context

(same as GERMAN 4820, FRENCH 4820). Innovative interdisciplinary course addresses issues of access to international news and specific cultural context working in cross-disciplinary teams. Students in journalism, foreign language, international studies, political science and various other disciplines track cultural developments and information on no-US Web sites, blogs and digital social networks along with exploring various historical forms of communication that preceded the digital era of the Web. Students analyze the potential and limitations/ effects of blogs and the web in specific contemporary cultural contexts and as part of the broader historical evolution of the web. The course is taught in English. The goal of this course is two-fold; students learn the particulars of web blogging, explore various features of the contemporary social network landscape while focusing on the concept of culture, in particular the cultures of Europe and the US. Questions asked are: what is culture? What is common or popular right now in other cultures? And how do new social networks amplify or alter certain features or culture across national and international contests?

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing required


RUSS 4820W: Blogging the World: The Web in Cultural Context - Writing Intensive

(same as GERMAN 4820, FRENCH 4820). Innovative interdisciplinary course addresses issues of access to international news and specific cultural context working in cross-disciplinary teams. Students in journalism, foreign language, international studies, political science and various other disciplines track cultural developments and information on no-US Web sites, blogs and digital social networks along with exploring various historical forms of communication that preceded the digital era of the Web. Students analyze the potential and limitations/ effects of blogs and the web in specific contemporary cultural contexts and as part of the broader historical evolution of the web. The course is taught in English. The goal of this course is two-fold; students learn the particulars of web blogging, explore various features of the contemporary social network landscape while focusing on the concept of culture, in particular the cultures of Europe and the US. Questions asked are: what is culture? What is common or popular right now in other cultures? And how do new social networks amplify or alter certain features or culture across national and international contests?

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing required


RUSS 4840: Totalitarianism and Culture

(same as GERMAN 4840; cross-leveled with GERMAN 7840, RUSS 7840). In this course, we will explore the politics and poetics of totalitarian culture by examining the paintings, music, sculptures, buildings, and films produced under the rule of these regimes. In the process, we will learn how Nazi and Soviet culture producers made carefully calibrated appeals to their respective mass audiences, drawing upon the German and Russian cultural traditions - and on scientific rhetorics of cultural history and racial destiny - in crafting their utopian visions of worlds transformed, wrongs righted, and societies perfected.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: Junior standing or above; students taking this course for WI should have taken a 2000- or 3000-level WI course before beginning this class


RUSS 4840H: Totalitarianism and Culture - Honors

(same as GERMAN 4840H; cross-leveled with GERMAN 7840, RUSS 7840). In this course, we will explore the politics and poetics of totalitarian culture by examining the paintings, music, sculptures, buildings, and films produced under the rule of these regimes. In the process, we will learn how Nazi and Soviet culture producers made carefully calibrated appeals to their respective mass audiences, drawing upon the German and Russian cultural traditions - and on scientific rhetorics of cultural history and racial destiny - in crafting their utopian visions of worlds transformed, wrongs righted, and societies perfected.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required
Recommended: Junior standing or above; students taking this course for WI should have taken a 2000- or 3000-level WI course before beginning this class


RUSS 4840HW: Totalitarianism and Culture - Honors/Writing Intensive

(same as GERMAN 4840HW; cross-leveled with GERMAN 7840, RUSS 7840). In this course, we will explore the politics and poetics of totalitarian culture by examining the paintings, music, sculptures, buildings, and films produced under the rule of these regimes. In the process, we will learn how Nazi and Soviet culture producers made carefully calibrated appeals to their respective mass audiences, drawing upon the German and Russian cultural traditions - and on scientific rhetorics of cultural history and racial destiny - in crafting their utopian visions of worlds transformed, wrongs righted, and societies perfected.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required
Recommended: Junior standing or above; students taking this course for WI should have taken a 2000- or 3000-level WI course before beginning this class


RUSS 4840W: Totalitarianism and Culture - Writing Intensive

(same as GERMAN 4840; cross-leveled with GERMAN 7840, RUSS 7840). In this course, we will explore the politics and poetics of totalitarian culture by examining the paintings, music, sculptures, buildings, and films produced under the rule of these regimes. In the process, we will learn how Nazi and Soviet culture producers made carefully calibrated appeals to their respective mass audiences, drawing upon the German and Russian cultural traditions - and on scientific rhetorics of cultural history and racial destiny - in crafting their utopian visions of worlds transformed, wrongs righted, and societies perfected.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: Junior standing or above; students taking this course for WI should have taken a 2000- or 3000-level WI course before beginning this class


RUSS 4850: Revolution and Media in a Global Perspective

(same as GERMAN 4850; cross-leveled with RUSS 7850, GERMAN 7850). This course offers a historical and global survey of the rise of modern revolution, from France to Haiti to Russia to the Black Power movement and beyond. Drawing on media studies and cultural studies, we will explore how revolutions are tied up in specific medial environments. This entails asking how media spread revolution, whether in print and visual culture, in the broadcast media of the twentieth century, or in the digital landscapes of the twenty-first century, and how revolutions can be understood themselves as media events. In the process students will develop a critical vocabulary for discussing the role of media in political and cultural revolution and counter-revolution in a global perspective. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 4850H: Revolution and Media in a Global Perspective - Honors

(same as GERMAN 4850; cross-leveled with RUSS 7850, GERMAN 7850). This course offers a historical and global survey of the rise of modern revolution, from France to Haiti to Russia to the Black Power movement and beyond. Drawing on media studies and cultural studies, we will explore how revolutions are tied up in specific medial environments. This entails asking how media spread revolution, whether in print and visual culture, in the broadcast media of the twentieth century, or in the digital landscapes of the twenty-first century, and how revolutions can be understood themselves as media events. In the process students will develop a critical vocabulary for discussing the role of media in political and cultural revolution and counter-revolution in a global perspective. Graded on A-F basis only. Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 4850W: Revolution and Media in a Global Perspective - Writing Intensive

(cross-leveled with RUSS 7850, GERMAN 7850). This course offers a historical and global survey of the rise of modern revolution, from France to Haiti to Russia to the Black Power movement and beyond. Drawing on media studies and cultural studies, we will explore how revolutions are tied up in specific medial environments. This entails asking how media spread revolution, whether in print and visual culture, in the broadcast media of the twentieth century, or in the digital landscapes of the twenty-first century, and how revolutions can be understood themselves as media events. In the process students will develop a critical vocabulary for discussing the role of media in political and cultural revolution and counter-revolution in a global perspective. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7085: Problems in Russian and Slavonic Studies

Special problems in Slavic literature or linguistics.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7087: Seminar in Russian

Course content varies.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7105: Topics in 19th Century Russian Literature-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7205: Topics in 20th Century Russian Literature

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7350: Special Readings in Russian


Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 7420: Russian Poetry

(cross-leveled with RUSS 4420). Survey of readings in Russian poetry from its beginnings to present.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7430: Russian Drama

(cross-leveled with RUSS 4430). Selected readings in and discussions of major Russian plays of the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7435: Russian Prose

(cross-leveled with RUSS 4435). Explores the development of prose writing in modern Russian letters, paying special attention to native generic designations. Considers dual imagery of realist/naturalist and romantic/fantastic approaches. Studies diverse examples: rasskaz (story), the povest' (tale), the novella, novel essay, early 19th c. through 20th c. Considers ways in which literature can itself stand as a philosophical form.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7440: The Russian Novel

(cross-leveled with RUSS 4440). Selected readings and seminar discussion of major novelists of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7550: Nabokov's Russian Fiction

(cross-leveled with RUSS 4550). Systematic analysis of Vladimir Nabokov's fiction, both novels and short stories. Emphasis on the artistic properties of prose. Lectures and class discussion in English. Readings in Russian.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7730: Internship in Russian

Supervised introduction to the methodology of the teaching of elementary Russian; conducted in a classroom environment.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7840: Totalitarianism and Culture

(same as GERMAN 7840; cross-leveled with GERMAN 4840, RUSS 4840). In this course, we will explore the politics and poetics of totalitarian culture by examining the paintings, music, sculptures, buildings, and films produced under the rule of these regimes. In the process, we will learn how Nazi and Soviet culture producers made carefully calibrated appeals to their respective mass audiences, drawing upon the German and Russian cultural traditions - and on scientific rhetorics of cultural history and racial destiny - in crafting their utopian visions of worlds transformed, wrongs righted, and societies perfected.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 7850: Revolution and Media in a Global Perspective

(same as GERMAN 7850; cross-leveled with RUSS 4850, GERMAN 4850). This course offers a historical and global survey of the rise of modern revolution, from France to Haiti to Russia to the Black Power movement and beyond. Drawing on media studies and cultural studies, we will explore how revolutions are tied up in specific medial environments. This entails asking how media spread revolution, whether in print and visual culture, in the broadcast media of the twentieth century, or in the digital landscapes of the twenty-first century, and how revolutions can be understood themselves as media events. In the process students will develop a critical vocabulary for discussing the role of media in political and cultural revolution and counter-revolution in a global perspective. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 8050: Research in Russian

Translations or creative work not leading to thesis.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8085: Problems in Russian and Slavonic Studies

Special problems in Slavic literature or linguistics.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8090: Thesis Research in Russian

Independent research leading to a Master's thesis. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8220: Russian Intellectual History and Critical Theory I

Survey of Russian literary and cultural criticism of the 18th and 19th centuries. Course texts will include representative critical essays as well as selected literary texts. May be taken before or after RUSS 8230.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 8305: Topics in Slavic Linguistics

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8405: Topics in Slavic Literatures

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


RUSS 8510: The Art and Life of Pushkin

Gives a conceptual thematic overview of Alexander Pushkin's lyrical poetry, as well as some dramatic work and prose. Special attention paid to the parallel development of his artistic and religious beliefs. Poetry read in Russian; prose and dramatic poems in Russian and English.

Credit Hours: 3


RUSS 8650: Old Church Slavonic

Designed to familiarize student with the phonological system, inflectional morphology and most important literature of the oldest recorded Slavic language. Comparisons of OCS to modern Slavic languages.

Credit Hours: 3