Constitutional Democracy (CNST_DEM)

CNST_DEM 1540: England Before the Glorious Revolution

(same as HIST 1540). Survey of English institutions, culture and politics from the Roman invasion to the Revolution of 1688.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 2004: Topics in Constitutional Democracy - Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-6


CNST_DEM 2100: The Revolutionary Transformation of Early America

(same as HIST 2100). In the broadest of terms, this is a course on origins. On one hand, we will devote significant class time to discussing "the causes which impelled" the colonies to throw off the yoke of British rule. We will examine this on both a practical and a more abstract level, focusing first on writings that delineate why colonists grew to perceive the economic, social, and political conditions of British rule as insufferable, and then on how they translated these practical concerns into a more ideological justification of violent revolution.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 2100H: The Revolutionary Transformation of Early America - Honors

(same as HIST 2100H). In the broadest of terms, this is a course on origins. On one hand, we will devote significant class time to discussing "the causes which impelled" the colonies to throw off the yoke of British rule. We will examine this on both a practical and a more abstract level, focusing first on writings that delineate why colonists grew to perceive the economic, social, and political conditions of British rule as insufferable, and then on how they translated these practical concerns into a more ideological justification of violent revolution.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


CNST_DEM 2120H: The Young Republic - Honors

(same as HIST 2120H). This course examines the early years of the United States under the (then) new Constitution, an important historical period with which present-day Americans are increasingly unfamiliar. Our focus will be on abandoning our preconceptions about the nation's early history and thoroughly understanding the choices that were posed and made in the years after 1789 and that would determine what type of nation the U.S. would become.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


CNST_DEM 2150: The American Civil War: A Global History

(same as HIST 2150). In this class students will study the American Civil War from the perspective of global history. The familiar actors and events will be covered - the debate over slavery, the secession of the South, the rise of Abraham Lincoln, the great battles and generals, etc. But these familiar episodes will take on different meanings when viewed in relation to global structures of politics, economics, social relations, and ideology. The 1860s was at once a formative moment in the history of globalization and the key decade for the formation and consolidation of modern nations.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 2425: Race and the American Story

(same as BL_STU 2425, POL_SC 2425). This course represents a collaboration between the University of Missouri's Department of Black Studies and the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy. Building upon the existing Citizenship@Mizzou program, the course aims to carry forward the goals of the Citizenship program and to further solidify and magnify its impact on campus. In so doing, the course will also serve as a model for improving diversity education on campuses across the country and contribute to a more informed and unified national culture. The core syllabus will consist in readings that tell the story of the confrontation between American political principles and the practice of racial injustice throughout our history. Students will read and discuss the Declaration of Independence, the slavery clauses in the Constitution, the poetry of Phillis Wheatley, and the speeches of Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King, Jr., among others. They will achieve a greater understanding of how diversity relates to humanity, and will learn to dialogue productively and civilly with others who may not share their background or opinions.

Credit Hour: 1


CNST_DEM 2430: History of American Religion

(same as HIST 2430). This course focuses on the overall development of American religion from the 17th century to the present. Students will be invited to think about the larger questions concerning American religion, including why religion in America has developed in the way that it has, and how and why it continues to thrive in American popular culture.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 2445: American Constitutional Democracy

(same as POL_SC 2445, HIST 2445). This course offers an introduction to American constitutional democracy. On the one hand, this course will strive to set the development of America's constitutional democracy into its historical context and to explain it in relation to larger social, political, military, and economic events. A second emphasis is on the nature and character of the American democratic system. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 2450H: The Intellectual World of the American Founders - Honors

(same as POL_SC 2450H). This course demonstrates that truly understanding the American constitutional and democratic traditions begins with acknowledging and studying how, in framing the Constitution and in imagining the new nation, the Founders drew on the work and cobbled together the ideas of thinkers from multiple eras and continents and, moreover, thinkers of vastly different political ideologies and disciplinary expertise.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


CNST_DEM 2455H: Constitutional Debates - Honors

(same as POL_SC 2455H). While we will make reference to the work of canonical political thinkers from the Western tradition during the semester--and while we will also, at times, take a broadly philosophical approach to describing certain of the Founders' theses on governance--this is not a course in "high theory". Instead, our examination of the process of drafting and ratifying the United States Constitution will be more pragmatic in nature, focusing on the practical problems and questions concerning national governance that shaped the final design of the Constitution. At the same time, this description of the class as one that addresses the Constitution in terms of the practical problems that the Founders saw it solving drastically understates the complexity and contentiousness of the subject matter that we will be examining. Specifically, the readings for the course will allow us to identify the ways in which, and reasons for which, the Founders disagreed not only on how to solve the problems of governance that the nation faced in 1787 but, moreover, on what these problems actually were. With regard to this task of understanding the principles underlying the heated debates that arose during the drafting and ratification process, it should be noted that this is not a class in Framer-worship. While we will discuss why the Federalists ultimately "won the day," we will also devote significant attention to how the Anti-Federalists both profoundly influenced how we understand constitutional democracy in the United States and provided an intellectual lineage that still informs contemporary political debate. We will, that is, give each side their due. In addition, we will conclude the semester by considering the Constitution's post-ratification history, looking at a handful of Supreme Court decisions and constitutional amendments in order to think about some of the questions that the 1787 Constitution left un-answered and some of the problems that it left un-solved.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required; POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 2800: Liberty, Justice and the Common Good

(same as POL_SC 2800). Selected great political theorists and their contemporary relevance. How to think critically about political ideas and ideologies.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 3220: U.S. Women's Political History, 1880-Present

(same as HIST 3220, WGST 3220). This course explores American women's engagement with American politics (broadly defined) over the course of the twentieth century. It addresses issues of political identity, organization, ideology, and division.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


CNST_DEM 4000: Age of Jefferson

(same as HIST 4000). Political, constitutional, cultural, and economic developments in United States during formative period of Republic, 1787-1828. Special attention to Constitutional Convention, formation of national political institutions.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 4080: American Foreign Policy from Colonial Times to 1898

(same as HIST 4080, PEA_ST 4080). This class probes the entwined development of the U.S. nation and empire, to the backdrop of accelerating structures of global economic integration, technological innovation, and the hardening of national, racial, and ideological formations.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 4100: American Cultural and Intellectual History to 1865

(same as HIST 4100). Origins and growth of American values and ideas considered in their social context. Topics include: the work ethic, republican politics, revivalism, reform movements, sexual attitudes, literature in the marketplace, Afro-American and slave-holding subcultures.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 4130: African-American Politics

(same as POL_SC 4130, BL_STU 4130). Surveys political participation of African-Americans in American politics. Analyzes their public lives in the context of elections, behavior of political organizations, social movements, parties, and level of government.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 4140: Congress and Legislative Policy

(same as POL_SC 4140). Study of national and state legislative systems and legislative policy making, with emphasis on Congress.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4150: The American Presidency

(same as POL_SC 4150). Evolution of the presidency; particular emphasis on constitutional and political roles played by chief executive in shaping public policy.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4170: Politics of the American South

(same as POL_SC 4170). This course focuses on the politics of the American South in the latter part of the 20th century and the early years of the current millennium. For undergraduate credit only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4200: The American Constitution

(same as POL_SC 4200). Leading American constitutional principles as they have evolved through important decisions of the United States Supreme Court.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4210: Constitutional Rights

(same as POL_SC 4210). Survey of Supreme Court cases involving the Constitution's protections for life, liberty, and property and guarantee of equal protection of the law.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4230: Constitution and Civil Liberties

(same as POL_SC 4230). Civil liberties in the American constitutional context emphasizing freedom of expression (religion, speech, press, assembly), rights of accused and right to privacy.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4400: History of American Law

(same as HIST 4400). American law from English origins to present. Reviews common law, codification, legal reform movements, slavery law, administrative state, formalism, legal realism, jurisprudential questions concerning rule of law.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: HIST 1100, HIST 1200, or HIST 1400


CNST_DEM 4800: Political Thought in Classical and Christian Antiquity

(same as POL_SC 4800, AMS 4800). Reading and discussion of Greek, Roman, and Early Christian treatises on politics and political life. Survey of the political institutions and procedures of the Greek city states and Roman Republic and Empire. Examination of contemporary Christian responses and adaptations.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: AMS 1060 and junior standing


CNST_DEM 4810: Modern Political Theory

(same as POL_SC 4810). Great political theorists from Machiavelli through Marx on the nation state, capitalism, liberalism, conservatism, and Marxism.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 4830: Democracy in America (and Elsewhere)

(same as POL_SC 4830). This course focuses on the dynamics of democracy. We will explore various topics in the history, development, and practice of democracy through an examination of the writings of Alexis de Tocqueville, one of the most insightful and prescient observers of American political culture.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4840: Developing Dynamics of Democracy

(same as POL_SC 4840). This course examines developments in the theory and practice of democracy from the ancient Greeks to the present. Beginning with the origins of democracy in the Hellenic city states, we consider the transformation of democratic concepts in the classical liberal period, review the development of democratic institutions in the United States and Europe, examine the emergence of supra-national democratic institutions such as the European Union, and assess the future of democratization in the 21st century.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4850: Scots and the Making of America

(same as POL_SC 4850). This class is on the influence of the Scottish Enlightenment on the founding of the United States. The Scottish Enlightenment refers to uniquely Scottish advances in social, political, scientific and literary thought that transpired in the 18th and early 19th centuries. This line of thought, especially in its social and political dimensions, was especially influential in shaping the founding of the United States.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


CNST_DEM 4900: Beltway History and Politics: American Constitutional Democracy in Theory and Practice

(same as HIST 4900, POL_SC 4900). This course is an experiential overview of American political history for students participating in the Kinder Forum's Washington internship program, showing how American constitutional democracy was developed and implemented right here on the Potomac, as much as possible in the actual places where the events occurred. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay between constitutional theory and actual political experience over time, and the tensions and institutional changes that emerged as Americans and their government coped with cataclysmic social changes, unparalleled economic development, and fearsome international challenges.

Credit Hours: 3


CNST_DEM 4975: Journal on Constitutional Democracy

(same as HIST 4975, POL_SC 4975). The Journal is sponsored by the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy and staffed by current and former participants in the Institute's undergraduate Society of Fellows program. Each volume of the Journal is organized around a student-selected idea or era central to the historical development and philosophical foundations of constitutional democracy in the United States. Student-authored essays address this theme via arguments and historical overviews crafted from the close reading and analysis of primary source documents, with the exception being that participating in the Journal will relate back to and advance students' study of American political thought and history.

Credit Hour: 1-3


CNST_DEM 7004: Topics in Constitutional Democracy - Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-6