History (HIST)

HIST 1004: Undergraduate Topics in History-Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and credits may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-3


HIST 1100: Survey of American History to 1865

Introduction to U.S. history through the Civil War, surveying political, economic, social and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit In HIST 1400 (AP credit for US History).

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1100H: Survey of American History to 1865 - Honors

Introduction to U.S. history through the Civil War, surveying political, economic, social and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit In HIST 1400 (AP credit for US History).

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 1200: Survey of American History Since 1865

Introduction to U.S. history since 1865, surveying political, economic, social, and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit In HIST 1400 (AP credit for US History).

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1200H: Survey of American History Since 1865 - Honors

Introduction to U.S. history since 1865, surveying political, economic, social, and cultural development of the American people. No credit will be given to students who have received credit In HIST 1400 (AP credit for US History).

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 1400: American History

Broad survey of political, economic, social, intellectual, diplomatic and constitutional development of American people from first English settlements to present day; emphasizes evolution of American culture and institutions. Students may not receive additional credit for HIST 1100 and/or HIST 1200.

Credit Hours: 5


HIST 1410: African American History

(same as BL_STU 1410). Survey of social, political and economic development to the African American people in American life from 1619 to the present.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1420: Globalization and History

This course will explore the contemporary phenomenon of globalization in historical perspective. Our goal will be to help students come to terms with the origins and dynamics of this process, which is transforming our economy and society more rapidly and thoroughly than ever before.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1500: Foundations of Western Civilization

Development of characteristic ideas and institutions of Western cultural tradition, from origin of civilization in ancient Near East to beginning of rapid social, political, intellectual transformation of Europe in 18th century.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1500H: Foundations of Western Civilization - Honors

Development of characteristic ideas and institutions of Western cultural tradition, from origin of civilization in ancient Near East to beginning of rapid social, political, intellectual transformation of Europe in 18th century.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 1510: History of Modern Europe

Selected major themes in European history from French Revolution to recent times. Breakdown of traditional institutions, ideas; political, social revolution; industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, world wars; democratic, totalitarian ideologies, movements; quest for international order, European unity.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1510H: History of Modern Europe - Honors

Selected major themes in European history from French Revolution to recent times. Breakdown of traditional institutions, ideas; political, social revolution; industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, world wars; democratic, totalitarian ideologies, movements; quest for international order, European unity.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 1510HW: History of Modern Europe - Honors/Writing Intensive

Selected major themes in European history from French Revolution to recent times. Breakdown of traditional institutions, ideas; political, social revolution; industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, world wars; democratic, totalitarian ideologies, movements; quest for international order, European unity.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 1520: The Ancient World

Survey of institutional and cultural development of ancient Near East, Greece, Rome, and Asia.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1540: England Before the Glorious Revolution

Survey of English institutions, culture and politics from the Roman invasion to the Revolution of 1688.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1550: Britain 1688 to the Present

Surveys British history from 1688 to present. Emphasizes social and economic change.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1560: The World of the Middle Ages

Survey of European development from the fall of Rome to the 16th century.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1570: Survey of Early Modern Europe, 1350-1650

Survey of Western and Central Europe (including Britain) from the Black Death to the end of the Thirty Years' War. This period comprises late medieval crises, the Renaissance, Reformation, Counter-Reformation, Exploration and the New World, the Confessional Age, early modern state-building, and the Thirty Years' War.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1580: History of Christianity

Origin, diffusion and development of Christianity, with special attention to its influence on Western civilization. Major emphasis on period up to French Revolution.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1590: Women and the Family in the Pre-Modern West

Examines the changing roles of women and familial structures from the Ancient Mediterranean World to the Protestant Reformation and the effects of religious, political and economic change on the family.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1600: Foundations of Russian History

A survey of the Kievan and Muscovite period to the end of the 17th century.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1610: Russia in Modern Times

(same as PEA_ST 1610). Survey of Russian history from 1801 to present.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1790: History of Early Africa

(same as BL_STU 1790). This course introduces students to the early history of Africa. It focuses on political, social, economic and cultural developments based on primary and secondary sources available in print and online.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1800: History of Modern Africa

(same as BL_STU 1800). This course introduces students to the recent history of Africa. It provides them with an opportunity to understand the main challenges Africans faced since colonial times based on primary and secondary sources.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1810: History of South Africa

(same as BL_STU 1810). Surveys the social, cultural and economic dynamics of South African society from the 16th century to the present with an emphasis on the last two centuries and the consolidation of the apartheid state.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1820: Asian Humanities

(same as REL_ST 1820, AR_H_A 1230 and S_A_ST 1152). This course in an introduction to the literature and visual arts of Asia through selected master works. It focuses principally on India and China and investigates the distinctive features of their cultures.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1830: Survey of East Asian History

(same as KOREAN 1830). Introductory survey of the history of East Asian countries (China, Korea, Vietnam, and Japan) in the past two thousand years, focusing on their cultural, economic, and political traditions as well as their transformations in the modern era.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1840: Colonial Latin America

Survey of Latin America, 1492-1825; Exploration and conquest; European settlement; colonial government and institutions; economy and society; cultural and intellectual life, independence movements.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1850: Latin America Since Independence

Political, social and economic developments; nationalism; revolutionary movements; U.S. influence.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1860: History of Ancient India

(same as S_A_ST 1860). This course surveys the history of South Asian history. The course begins with the Indus Valley Civilization (fl. 2600-1900B.C.) and ends with an analysis of Islamic impact on India culture around 1200-1350. Emphasis will be placed on cultural and social history, religion, arts and literature, and the sources used for the study of premodern civilizations. Students will develop a basic knowledge and vocabulary necessary to pursue additional South Asian courses.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1861: History of Modern India

(same as [S_A_ST 1861). This course surveys the history of the South Asian subcontinent from the early seventeenth through the twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on cultural and social history, religion, arts and literature, imperialism and colonialism, and the sources used for the study of modern civilizations. Students will develop a basic knowledge and vocabulary necessary to pursue additional South Asian courses.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1862: History of India: 1000-1750

(same as [S_A_ST 1862). This course surveys the history of the South Asian subcontinent from the eleventh through mid-eighteenth centuries. Emphasis will be placed on cultural and social history, religion, arts and literature, and the sources used to study civilization. Students will develop a basic knowledge and vocabulary necessary to pursue additional South Asian courses.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1870: Imperial China: China to 1600

This course offers a broad introduction to Chinese history and culture from antiquity up to the later imperial period (around 1600). It is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the historical development of China's culture, economic, political, and intellectual traditions.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1871: History of China in Modern Times

This is a lecture course designed to introduce to beginning level students the epic journey of China's historical transformation since c. 1600. This survey provides a basis for understanding the painstaking transition from "tradition" to "modernity" in China.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 1872: Mao's China and Beyond: China Since 1949

Through a series of readings, images, and film we will look at the dramatic cultural, economic, social and intellectual changes the People's Republic of China has experienced since 1949, and look at the interrelated, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering economic prosperity while promoting policies of integrating with the international society.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2004: Topics in History-Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-99


HIST 2004H: Topics in History-Social Science - Honors

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 2100H: The Revolutionary Transformation of America - Honors

In the broadest of terms, this is a course on origins. On one hand, we will devote significant class time to discussing "the causes which impelled" the colonies to throw off the yoke of British rule. We will examine this on both a practical and a more abstract level, focusing first on writings that delineate why colonists grew to perceive the economic, social, and political conditions of British rule as insufferable, and then on how they translated these practical concerns into a more ideological justification of violent revolution.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 2120H: The Young Republic - Honors

This course examines the early years of the United States under the (then) new Constitution, an important historical period with which present-day Americans are increasingly unfamiliar. Our focus will be on abandoning our preconceptions about the nation's early history and thoroughly understanding the choices that were posed and made in the years after 1789 and that would determine what type of nation the U.S. would become.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 2150: The American Civil War: A Global History

In this class students will study the American Civil War from the perspective of global history. The familiar actors and events will be covered - the debate over slavery, the secession of the South, the rise of Abraham Lincoln, the great battles and generals, etc. But these familiar episodes will take on different meanings when viewed in relation to global structures of politics, economics, social relations, and ideology. The 1860s was at once a formative moment in the history of globalization and the key decade for the formation and consolidation of modern nations.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2210: Twentieth Century America

Survey of American development from 1900 to present. For students who have not taken advanced courses in American history, especially HIST 4210, HIST 4220, or HIST 4230.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2220: America in the 1960's

(same as PEA_ST 2220). Examines the political and cultural main currents of the 1960s. Emphasizes the challenges mounted by protest groups and the responses of America's political leadership to the ferment of the period.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2230: Walt Disney and American Culture

Examines Walt Disney's influence on shaping of modern American culture.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2400: Social History of U.S. Women

(same as WGST 2400). This course, the social History of US Women, offers a general overview of US Women, beginning with the colonial period up to the present day.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2410: African American Women in History

(same as BL_STU 2410 and WGST 2410). African American Women in history is a topics course covering major issues affecting black women since their introduction into english-speaking North America to the present.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2420: Conspiracy Theories and Conspiracies in American History and Culture

From the Salem witch trials to the present-day obsessions with the JFK assassination, UFOs, and the like, Americans have often embraced conspiracy theories to explain mysterious events and wrenching social changes. The primary objective of the course is to help students deal more intelligently with the conspiratorial fears and political paranoia that pervade modern American culture, by placing them in a broad historical context. Prerequisites: sophomore standing

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2430: History of American Religion

This course focuses on the overall development of American religion from the 17th century to the present. Students will be invited to think about the larger questions concerning American religion, including why religion in America has developed in the way that it has, and how and why it continues to thrive in American popular culture.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2440: History of Missouri

Survey of Missouri's development from the beginning of settlement to present.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2445: American Constitutional Democracy

(same as POL_SC 2445). This course offers an introduction to American constitutional democracy. On the one hand, this course will strive to set the development of America's constitutional democracy into its historical context and to explain it in relation to larger social, political, military, and economic events. A second emphasis is on the nature and character of the American democratic system. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2520: From Waterloo to Sarajevo: European History, 1815-1914

Political, social, economic, and cultural development of Europe from French Revolution to outbreak of World War I.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing required


HIST 2520W: From Waterloo to Sarajevo: European History, 1815-1914 - Writing Intensive

Political, social, economic, and cultural development of Europe from French Revolution to outbreak of World War I.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing required


HIST 2530: Ukrainian History from Medieval to Modern Times

A successor state of the former Soviet Union, Ukraine occupies a strategic position in Eastern Europe. The course will trace the long, turbulent history of this East Slavic nation, culminating the independence in 1991.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2531: Women in Russian History

This is a survey course which is designed for students who have not previously taken in course in Russian history, and who are interested in how women experienced the period from the formation of the Kievan state in the ninth century to the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2580: Mafia Myth and Reality: The Italian Mafia and the Nation-State, 1860 to the Present

This course explores contemporary cultural representations of the Mafia in film and literature and grounds these fictional representations in the history of modern Italy. We trace the emergence of the various Mafia networks during the wars of the Risorgimento and the construction of the "southern problem", and the impact transnational Italian migration, the rise of Fascism and the postwar reconstruction had on the form and function of these networks.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2600: Early Christianity

(same as REL_ST 2600). History of Christian practices and teachings from Christian origins through the 8th century, including Eastern Orthodoxy Syrian Christianity, Roman Catholicism. Themes such as interpretation and creation of Scriptures, worship style, central rituals, debates about right teaching (orthodoxy) mysticism and developing lifestyles both in and apart from the world.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 2610: Medieval Christianity

(same as REL_ST 2610). Study of the doctrinal developments, major theologians and schools, institutional formation and dissolution, mysticism, and liturgical expression within the context of cultural and political history. Beginning with Augustine and concluding with the 15th century. Prerequisites: REL_ST 2600

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2620: History of Christianity, 1500-Present

(same as REL_ST 2620). Protestant and Catholic Christianity in age of European expansion; enlightenment; 19th and 20th-century challenges and responses.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: REL_ST 2600 and REL_ST 2610


HIST 2630: History of Christian Traditions

(same as REL_ST 2630). An overview of the origins and development of Christianities from the first century of the Common Era to the present day. Topics will include competing Christian theologies, colonialism, conversion narratives, globalization, religious violence, and heresy.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2800: Women in Indian History

(same as S_A_ST 2800). This course examines the role of women in Indian (South Asian) history, focusing on women in British Indian from the eighteenth century up to the Partition of 1947. While previous knowledge of South Asian history may be beneficial, it is not required for this course.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2810: History of Korea: Premodern to Hypermodern

(same as KOREAN 2810). This course examines Korea historically. The area known as Korea and the people identified as Korean are considered temporally from the ancient times to the contemporary period. This course begins with the questions of what is Korea and when it became a distinct place in world history.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2820: Taiwan: The First Chinese Democracy

This course is an introduction to the history of Taiwan, from the seventeenth century to the present day. This course examines historical development leading to the contemporary situation. It problematizes the notion that "democracy is not suitable for Chinese society."

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2904: Black Studies in Slavery and Freedom

(same as BL_STU 2904). This course provides study of historical background, economic, political and social implications of slavery and freedom in the African Diaspora (Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia) as well as the legal and extralegal struggles for and meaning of (global, local, and national) freedom.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 2950: Sophomore Seminar

This course is designed to introduce history majors to the experience of doing original research early in their undergraduate career. Topic will vary.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent required


HIST 2950W: Sophomore Seminar - Writing Intensive

This course is designed to introduce history majors to the experience of doing original research early in their undergraduate career. Topic will vary.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent required


HIST 3000: History of Religion in America to the Civil War

(same as REL_ST 3000). Studies major American religious traditions from the Age of Discovery to the Civil War, especially the evolution of religious practices and institutions and their influence upon American social, intellectual and political developments.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 3010: Colonial America

This course will examine major colonial American events from a cultural history standpoint. We will explore the ways in which the famous and not so famous shaped and were shaped by events of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and how these people understood the changing meaning of American liberty.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3200: Black Freedom Movement, 1955-1973

(same as BL_STU 3200). Examines the dismantling of American apartheid and its transformation into a new racial control system. It also explores how and why the Civil Rights Movement was converted into a struggle for Black Power.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3210: History of Religion in Post-Civil War America

(same as REL_ST 3210). Surveys major American religious traditions from 1865 to the present. Focuses on the evaluation of religious practices and institutions and their interaction with and influence upon American social, intellectual and political developments.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3220: U.S. Women's Political History, 1880-Present

(same as WGST 3220). This course explores American women's engagement with American politics (broadly defined) over the course of the twentieth century. It addresses issues of political identity, organization, ideology, and division.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 3230: Individualism and Success in Modern America, 1830-Present

This course explores changing notions of individualism and success in American culture during the 19th and 20th centuries. Standards defining achievement, gain, and happiness for the individual citizen have evolved over time, and we will examine a wide variety of sources - advice literature, essays, novels, historical texts, plays and movies, political and religious texts, social criticism - to analyze this broad evolution. The resulting insights into a variety of historical issues and values, problems and possibilities, promise to forge a deeper understanding of what it has meant to be a successful individual in the United States over the last two hundred years.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3400: Religious Biography: Black Religion

(same as BL_STU 3590). Studies black American religion through the biographies of representative and influential figures of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Nat Turner, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Marcus Garvey, M.L. King, Malcolm X.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3420: America's Environmental Experience

(same as PEA_ST 3420). Team-taught analysis of American thought and action on physical environment during 19th-20th centuries. Relation between politics, economics, technological change, environmental quality; roles of science, law, regulatory agencies, grassroots action.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3430: Sex Radicals in U. S History

(same as WGST 3430). Survey of the history of sexuality in the United States.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 3485: The United States and the Middle East

This course will explore the history of American relations with the Middle East. How have U.S. Policy-makers defined American interests in this region? How have they sought to protect and advance those interests? We will consider the cultural stereotypes and assumptions Americans have brought to their relations with the Middle East, and the images of the Middle East that have been projected in American popular culture. Finally, we will explore the ways in which the current political situations in the Middle East reflects the results of past U.S.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3510: The Ancient Greek World

Political and social institutions, intellectual life of Greek city-states to time of Alexander.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3515: Egypt From Alexander the Great to Cleopatra

This course deals with the history of Egypt under the Ptolemaic dynasty (323-30 BC) of the Hellenistic period. Its main focus is political and military history, but various social and economic aspects of Egyptian society, as well as the infamous Ptolemaic bureaucracy, are considered, as well as the literary and scientific output of scholars at Alexandria, the intellectual center of the Hellenistic world.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3520: The Roman World

Rise and development of Roman institutions, Rome's imperialism and culture through reign of Marcus Aurelius.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3530: The Hellenistic World: From Alexander to Rome

The achievements of Alexander the Great; political, social, economic development of Hellenistic kingdoms from his death to 31 B. C.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3540: 20th Century Europe

Political, social, and economic development of Europe from 1900 to the present, with emphasis on the period between the two world wars.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3540W: 20th Century Europe - Writing Intensive

Political, social, and economic development of Europe from 1900 to the present, with emphasis on the period between the two world wars.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3550: The Origins of Scientific Thought

This course will trace the evolution of Western science from its Egyptian-Babylonian roots to the "Copernican Revolution" of the mid-sixteenth century.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 3555: Galileo and His World

(same as GN_HON 3230H). The purpose of this course is to evaluate Galileo's contribution to modern science on the basis, primarily, of his actual writings. In the process, we will examine the "Galileo Myth", focusing on the problem of scientific truth and freedom of thought.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3560: The Scientific Revolution: 1550-1800

This course covers the history of science, or natural philosophy, from late Renaissance to the beginnings of the "Darwinian Revolution."

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 3570: European Women in the 19th Century

(same as WGST 3570). Examines the history of European women from 1750 to 1900. The course focuses on how industrialization, the French Revolution and nation-formation changed women's roles in the family, workplace and the state. Grading: exams, papers and discussions.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 3580: Modern Italy, 1815 to the Present

Political, cultural and social history of Italy since 1815. Looks at how Unification, World War, Fascism, the Cold War, Student protests, the women's movement and the end of the USSR shaped contemporary Italy.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3590: The Early Middle Ages

This course will focus on the social, political, economic, and cultural development of Europe from roughly 300 to 1050.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 3600: The Later Middle Ages

This course will focus on the social, political, economic, and cultural development of Europe from roughly 1050 to 1500. Prerequisites: sophomore standing

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3610: Ireland, 1100s to 1850

(same as PEA_ST 3610). Ireland, from Conquest to Famine: Ireland's history as the first British Colony, from the conquests of the 1100s and 1500s-1600s to the Irish rebellion of 1798 and the Great Famine and mass emigration of 1845-50.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 3611: Ireland, 1850-1923

(same as PEA_ST 3611). Ireland, from Famine to Partition: Irish history from the Great Famine of 1845-50 to the revolutions of 1916-23 that brought partial independence from Britain but partitioned Ireland into two hostile and trouble states.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3612: Ireland, 1920-Present

(same as PEA_ST 3612). Ireland, from Partition to the Present: After surveying the conflicts that led to Irish revolution and partition in 1916-23, the course focuses on the development of post partition Ireland and Northern Ireland, and on the violence that has scarred Northern Ireland since the 1960s.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: May be restricted to History majors only during preregistration
Recommended: HIST 3610 and/or HIST 3611


HIST 3624: Comparative Approaches to Black Studies in History

(same as BL_STU 3624). Comparative approach to the study of Black Diaspora history that focuses on the theory, method, structure, and application of modes of cultural production within the history of Black Diaspora cultures. Program consent for repetition.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3624W: Comparative Approaches to Black Studies in History - Writing Intensive

(same as BL_STU 3624). Comparative approach to the study of Black Diaspora history that focuses on the theory, method, structure, and application of modes of cultural production within the history of Black Diaspora cultures. Program consent for repetition.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3820: Twentieth Century China

History of China from Nationalist Revolution of 1911 to present. A problem-oriented course: special emphasis on Mao and Maoist ideology, social, literary and cultural history also receive attention.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3830: Chinese Women's History

Historical analysis of Chinese women in family, community, ideology, and national politics from the Late Imperial period to the present.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3850: Islam and the West

(same as PEA_ST 3850). This course provides a historical intellectual context for the raging debate on Islam and the West. It will discuss how Muslims conceived and reacted variously to the political and cultural challenge the West posed in the nineteenth and twentieth century. It will focus on the discourse on the reception of modernization in Islam. It will highlight the political and cultural energies invested by various Muslim elite communities to distinguish between modernization and Westernization. Islamic fundamentalism, the dominant Islamic expression of our time, will be usefully discussed in the context of this debate and praxis about modernization, authenticity, and Westernization.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior/senior standing


HIST 3860: History of Mexico

Survey of Mexican history from Cortes to present day.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3870: Social Revolution in Latin America

(same as PEA_ST 3870 and SOCIOL 3870). Twentieth century social revolutions in selected Latin American countries.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 3880: History of Caribbean America

Comparative regional study of insular and mainland Caribbean nations. Emphasis on modern period. Independence; abolition of slavery; U.S. hegemony; economic, social, and political upheaval.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4000: Age of Jefferson

Political, constitutional, cultural, and economic developments in United States during formative period of Republic, 1787-1828. Special attention to Constitutional Convention, formation of national political institutions.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4001: Topics in History-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-99


HIST 4004: Topics in History-Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-99


HIST 4004H: Topics in History-Social Science - Honors

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 4004W: Topics in History-Social Science - Writing Intensive

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 1-99


HIST 4010: The Age of Jackson

This course will examine American Politics, society and culture in the 1820's, 1830's, and 1840's. Considerable attention will be devoted to Andrew Jackson himself, as a figure who both shaped and represented his era, for better or worse.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4030: History of the Old South

Study of the South to 1860.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4040: Slavery and the Crisis of the Union: The American Civil War Era

(same as BL_STU 4040; cross-leveled with HIST 7040). This class explores the history of the Civil War era, a transformative moment in both U.S. and world history. Our goal is to explore and answer a number of questions of great historical significance: How and why did slavery persist in an age of liberal democracy? Why did the pre-war Union prove unable to tolerate the plural visions and diverse institutions of its people? Was the descent into war more a measure of institutional weakness than of the intensity of moral conflict? What were the constituent elements of the competing wartime 'nationalisms' that evolved in both north and south? How and why did a war that began to restore the Union become one for emancipation? How was it the forerunner of modern, 'total' warfare? Did the governmental, socio-economic and racial changes wrought by war constitute a 'second American revolution'? Were the limits or the achievements of post-war Reconstruction more notable? And, last but certainly not least, how did the triumph of the Union condition the political and economic development of a rapidly globalizing world?

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4050: American Colonial History to 1760

Study of colonial America; special emphasis on creation of a native American culture prior to 1760.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4055: Witchcraft in Seventeenth Century New England

This course explores the social, cultural and intellectual aspects of witchcraft and witch-hunting in seventeenth century New England.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4060: The Period of the American Revolution, 1760-1789

Analysis of the Revolution, its causes and consequences, through establishment of the new government in 1789.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4070: Indians and Europeans in Early America

A study of the cultural, political and often military struggle that took place for control of North America from contact through mid 19th century emphasizing native efforts to resist European domination and expansion in areas that became the U.S. and Canada.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HIST 1100 or equivalent


HIST 4080: American Foreign Policy from Colonial Times to 1898

(same as PEA_ST 4080).

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4085: Special Problems in History

Independent investigation leading to a paper or project.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: Department consent required


HIST 4085H: Special Problems in History

Independent investigation leading to a paper or project.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


HIST 4085W: Special Problems in History - Writing Intensive

Independent investigation leading to a paper or project.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: Department consent required


HIST 4100: American Cultural and Intellectual History to 1865

Origins and growth of American values and ideas considered in their social context. Topics include: the work ethic, republican politics, revivalism, reform movements, sexual attitudes, literature in the marketplace, Afro-American and slave-holding subcultures.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4200: American Cultural and Intellectual History Since 1865

Tensions and transformations in American culture to the present. Topics include: spiritual crisis in Christianity; rise of welfare state liberalism; socialist and feminist alternatives; literature and the arts.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4210: Origins of Modern America, 1877-1919

Political, social, economic, and intellectual evolution of America into a modern society, 1877-1918.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4220: U.S. Society Between the Wars 1918-1945

Detailed examination of American history from end of World War I to end of World War II.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4230: Our Times: United States Since 1945

Detailed examination of American history from end of World War II to the present.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4235: The Wire: Race, Urban Inequality, and the "Crisis" of the American City

(cross-leveled with HIST 7235). The HBO series "The Wire", a crime drama based on the border city of Baltimore, exposed the interlocking, structural realities giving shape to the landscapes, neighborhoods, and lived experiences of urban America during the early twenty-first century. Through vivid storytelling, "The Wire" complicates understandings of the "urban crisis" through a focus on the inner workings of major institutions such as the media, public schools, politics, underground economies, public housing, and the criminal justice system and on the ways in which poor and working-class black residents negotiate power and survival. Using the cable series as a lens, this class offers students the opportunity to critically examine the historical, economic, social, and political dimensions of urban inequality.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4240: History of the New South

Study of the South since 1860.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4250: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1898-1945

A history of American Foreign Policy from the Spanish American War to the end of World War II.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 4260: The Age of Ascendancy: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1945 - Present

(same as PEA_ST 4260). Surveys the Cold War in Europe and Asia, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and Middle East policy.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 4270: African-Americans in the Twentieth Century

(same as BL_STU 4270). Surveys the African-American experience from 1900 to the present. Attention is given to economic, political, social, and cultural trends.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4280: America in the Reagan Years

Examines the major political, economic, social, and cultural currents and developments of the "Long Eighties," from Jimmy Carter's "malaise speech" of July 1979 to Bill Clinton's mid-1990s embrace of welfare reform and pronouncement that the era of big government was over.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4310: Adoption, Child Welfare and the Family, 1850-Present

(same as WGST 4310; cross-leveled with HIST 7310 and WGST 7310). This interdisciplinary U.S. history course will address topics such as: changing legal and social meaning of adoption since 1850; historical connections between adoption and poverty, family, gender race, sexuality, class, fertility, identity; and more recent issues such as transnational adoption.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4400: History of American Law

American law from English origins to present. Reviews common law, codification, legal reform movements, slavery law, administrative state, formalism, legal realism, jurisprudential questions concerning rule of law.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: HIST 1100, HIST 1200, or HIST 1400


HIST 4410: Introduction to U.S. Social History

Study of daily life and the ways ordinary Americans experienced historical change. Considers such topics as work, leisure, family and community. Compares how people's experiences varied by region, class, gender, ethnicity, and race.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4415: African Americans and American Justice

(same as BL_STU 4415) This course provides opportunities to review and discuss selected court cases and legislation in which black men, women, or children were plaintiffs and defendants or affected by the laws.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4415W: African Americans and American Justice - Writing Intensive

(same as BL_STU 4415) This course provides opportunities to review and discuss selected court cases and legislation in which black men, women, or children were plaintiffs and defendants or affected by the laws.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4420: American Urban History

Growth, development and implications of the city in American history; historical analysis of urban problems.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4425: The Superhero in American Culture From Washington to Wolverine

This course aims to help students become better informed and more critical consumers of popular culture by situating a selection of important American works and genres within the historical context of their creation, and in the history of American culture. Students will be challenged to look for historical patterns in popular culture and to consider the particular habits of thought and action that American popular culture seems to reinforce.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HIST 1100 or HIST 1200 or HIST 1400 or HIST 2210


HIST 4430: The Great West in American History

Historical development of major regions, with emphasis on response to environment, public land policy, role of government in economic and resource development, citizen action, and cultural pluralism.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4440: History of the American Environment

A reading and discussion course exploring diverse responses to the changing American environment from early man to the present, including ecological, institutional, and philosophical aspects.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4445: American Political Economy from the Commerce Clause to the Great Recession

This course examines the history of the American political economy from the founding of the United States to the recent Great Recession. Scholars of political economy explore the ways in which politics and public policy intersect with economics, such as the operation of the institutions like the tax system, the first and second Banks of the United States in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and the Federal Reserve after 1913. We will focus on efforts by the U.S. federal government to regulate the American economy and bring economic affairs under the control of the American people and their representatives through a wide variety of political, legal, and institutional mechanisms. A specialized knowledge of economics is not required for this course.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4445W: American Political Economy from the Commerce Clause to the Great Recession - Writing Intensive

This course examines the history of the American political economy from the founding of the United States to the recent Great Recession. Scholars of political economy explore the ways in which politics and public policy intersect with economics, such as the operation of the institutions like the tax system, the first and second Banks of the United States in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and the Federal Reserve after 1913. We will focus on efforts by the U.S. federal government to regulate the American economy and bring economic affairs under the control of the American people and their representatives through a wide variety of political, legal, and institutional mechanisms. A specialized knowledge of economics is not required for this course.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4470: Quantitative Methods in Historical Study

Introduces quantitative approaches to the study of history. Emphasizes opportunities, limitations, and dangers involved in several common forms of quantitative study. Math Reasoning Proficiency Course.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4480: War Crimes and Genocide

(same as PEA_ST 4480). This course will explore the development of international law, international consciousness, and U.S. Foreign policy on the two distinct but often related issues of war crimes and genocide during the late 19th and throughout the 20th centuries.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4500: Philip II and Alexander the Great of Macadonia

Concentrates on the history and politics of Greece during reigns of these two kings along with Alexander's military conquests and various controversies from the period.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4510: Crime and Punishment: Law in Classical Athens

Examines the main principles of Athenian law and judicial procedures including history of law code and study of actual speeches from a variety of law suits and procedures.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4515: Power and Oratory in Ancient Greece

Concentrates on the rise of oratory in Greece and how oratory was exploited for political ends. Special attention will be paid to the Athenian Democracy in the fifth and fourth centuries BC.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4520: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

(cross-leveled with HIST 7520). Analysis of the downfall of Republican institutions and the origins of autocracy, from the Gracchi to the death of Augustus in A.D. 14.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4530: The Roman Empire

Roman imperialism; management of, and rebellion in, the Empire; cultural exchange between Rome and its provinces.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4535: Monastic Worlds

(same as REL_ST 4535, MDVL_REN 4535; cross-leveled with REL_ST 7535, MDVL_REN 7535). Monastic Worlds is an experiential learning course designed to serve as a Humanities Field School in medieval and early modern studies. It will be taught by faculty from UMKC and UMC through the Intercampus Course Sharing initiative. The class introduces students to humanities research methodology and the religious history and culture of premodern Europe and the contemporary Midwest by using the monastic communities as a focal point to learn about musicology, history, art history, literature, and religion. Following two weeks of online course modules, students will travel to the Benedictine communities of Conception Abbey in Conception, Missouri and Mount Saint Scholastica's in Atchison, Kansas, for additional face-to-face classes and research projects. On-site, students will participate in communal living and attend face-to-face classes on the historical and cultural worlds of medieval and early modern Europe. They will practice ethnography through observation of and participation in communal life of prayer, study, book production, and labor. Students will also have the opportunity to work with the manuscripts and rare books owned by these communities and visit the largest reliquary collection in North America, housed at the nearby Benedictine community of the Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Clyde, MO. This course has an associated fee. Contact teaching faculty for this year's fee details. Graded on A/F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4540: The Later Roman Empire

Political, religious and cultural life in Late Antiquity, from the "soldier emperors," to the barbarian kingdoms and early Byzantium.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4550: Age of the Vikings

Scandinavia and Scandinavian expansion in the Central Middle Ages. Covers political, economic, religious, and cultural effects of the Viking movement.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing required
Recommended: HIST 1500, HIST 1540, HIST 1600 or HIST 2560


HIST 4550W: Age of the Vikings - Writing Intensive

Scandinavia and Scandinavian expansion in the Central Middle Ages. Covers political, economic, religious, and cultural effects of the Viking movement.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing required
Recommended: HIST 1500, HIST 1540, HIST 1600 or HIST 2560


HIST 4555: Medieval France

(cross-leveled with HIST 7555). This course covers the area that became the kingdom of France from the end of the Roman era until the end of the Hundred Years War; emphasis on political and cultural developments.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing
Recommended: Previous coursework in medieval history


HIST 4555W: Medieval France - Writing Intensive

(cross-leveled with HIST 7555). This course covers the area that became the kingdom of France from the end of the Roman era until the end of the Hundred Years War; emphasis on political and cultural developments.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing
Recommended: Previous coursework in medieval history


HIST 4560: The Crusades

Survey of the European crusading movement from its inception in the late eleventh century to its decline during the later Middle Ages.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


HIST 4570: Intellectual History of Europe, 17th and 18th Centuries

The Enlightenment's attack on traditional Christian thought and values.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


HIST 4580: The "Making" of Modern Europe: Identity, Culture, Empire

(cross-leveled with HIST 7580). This course will explore some of the ideas, institutions and events that shaped modern Western civilization and thought, focusing on Western Europe, but also giving attention to the relationship between the West and the rest of the world. The course will introduce topics such as the rise of, nationalism, the cult of science, scientific racism and sexism, consumer mass culture, fascist ideology, existentialism, psychoanalysis, the modern city, gender and sexuality.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


HIST 4585: Rome from Fascism to Liberation, 1922-1944

In this course we will explore the history of Fascism and German occupation in Italy through the city of Rome. We will study how fascism remade Rome, the arrival of the Germans, the history of the Jewish community and the deportations and the resistance.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4610: Early Modern Britain, 1450-1688

Study of English politics, society, economy, culture, and religion during primarily the Tudor and Stuart eras, from the establishment of the Tudor dynasty (1485) through the Glorious Revolution. Emphasis on social and religious history.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


HIST 4620: Modern England

Surveys British history in the 18th and 19th centuries. Emphasizes social and economic change.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4625: Nature vs. Nurture: The History of a Debate

(cross-leveled with HIST 7625). The purpose of this course is to explore the debate on nature vs. nurture in human society from the late eighteenth century to the present. The goal of this course is to give biology, history, and social science (including journalism) majors a better understanding of how this debate between nature and culture has played out over the past 250 years, and what impact it has left on biology, the social sciences, and public discourse today.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4630: The Age of the Renaissance

Major changes in European economic, social, political, religious, and intellectual life between 1250-1500. Humanism and Renaissance. The "Renaissance problem".

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4640: The Age of the Reformation

State of Europe about 1500. Political, diplomatic, social, and intellectual changes to 1648. Humanistic reform movements. Protestant-Catholic Reformation. Development of the modern state and international relations.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4645: Witchcraft and Witch Hunting in Pre-Modern Europe

(cross-leveled with HIST 7645). The surviving evidence indicates that between 1400 and 1700, at least 50,000 women, men, and children were executed for practicing witchcraft. Is there an explanation for this? Does it make any sense in terms of the intellectual, religious, social, political, and economic contexts of this period in European history? Fundamental to this course are the assumptions that there are many, not one, reasonable explanations for witchcraft beliefs and persecutions, and that when studied in terms of the various historical contexts this phenomenon must be understood as an integral part of European society during these centuries.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4650: Revolutionary France, 1789-1815

Revolutionary upheavals of the revolutionary-Napoleonic era, which destroyed traditional French society and laid the basis for modern France.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


HIST 4660: European Women in the 20th Century

(same as WGST 4660). Examines the history of European women from World War I to the present. The course focuses on wars, migration, and the changing nature of family, work and community.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


HIST 4670: From the Holy Roman Empire to the First World War: German History, 1750-1918

(cross-leveled with HIST 7670). Cultural, social and political history of Central Europe from 1800 to 1914. A case study in incomplete modernization, focused on industrialization, unification, cultural crisis and imperialism.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4670W: From the Holy Roman Empire to the First World War: German History, 1750-1918 - Writing Intensive

(cross-leveled with HIST 7670). Cultural, social and political history of Central Europe from 1800 to 1914. A case study in incomplete modernization, focused on industrialization, unification, cultural crisis and imperialism.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4680: From the Rise of the Nazis to the Fall of the Wall: German History in the Twentieth Century

(cross-leveled with HIST 7680). Cultural, social and political history from 1914 to present day. Focus on world wars, national socialism, the holocaust, the cold war and the emergence of East and West Germany.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4700: Imperial Russia, 1682-1825

Russia in the 18th and early 19th centuries, with special emphasis on the reigns of Peter I, Catherine II, and Alexander I.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4710: The Russian Revolution

Analyzes the transformation of Russian society that produced the collapse of autocracy, efforts to create a parliamentary government, the Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917, and the civil war that followed.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4800: Modern China and Japan: War, Imperialism and Memory

(cross-leveled with HIST 7800). This course examines the interaction between Japan and China since the late nineteenth century in an effort to understand deeper historical reasons behind the rising tension in East Asia at the present time.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4815: African History Through the Digital Medium

(cross-leveled with HIST 7815). This course invites students to explore the history of Africa through the digital medium. It offers a hands-on approach to understand how knowledge about African history, culture, and society is produced and disseminated over the World Wide Web.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4815W: African History Through the Digital Medium - Writing Intensive

(cross-leveled with HIST 7815). This course invites students to explore the history of Africa through the digital medium. It offers a hands-on approach to understand how knowledge about African history, culture, and society is produced and disseminated over the World Wide Web.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4840: History of the Mongols

In the 13th century, the Mongols went from warring tribes to the largest Eurasian empire in history. This course examines the Mongol tribes, Chinggis Khan's unification of the tribes, the Mongols rapid military victories across Eurasian and their equally rapid decline.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4850: Traversing the Muslim World

(same as S_A_ST 4850). The traveler's tale formed an important part of the medieval world's system of knowledge. This writing intensive seminar-style course examines a wide array of the most influential travelers in Muslim lands such as Ibn Fadlan, Ibn Battuta, Benjamin of Tudela and Marco Polo.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


HIST 4850W: Traversing the Muslim World - Writing Intensive

(same as S_A_ST 4850). The traveler's tale formed an important part of the medieval world's system of knowledge. This writing intensive seminar-style course examines a wide array of the most influential travelers in Muslim lands such as Ibn Fadlan, Ibn Battuta, Benjamin of Tudela and Marco Polo.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


HIST 4860: Colonial Masculinity/Colonial Frontier

(same as S_A_ST 4860). This writing intensive seminar-style course examines how the Indian Army acted as a colonial army in the British Empire, including Africa, the Boxer Rebellion, and the World Wars. Focus is on the role of the Indian Army, impact of the Sepoy Mutiny, and martial race ideology.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


HIST 4865: Buying Desire: History of Consumption

(cross-leveled with HIST 7865). This course explores the history of consumption practice in various cultural contexts. The course is divided into four parts: "Masses As Consumers", "Selling/Consuming Cultures", "Consumption as (Postcolonial) Modernity", and "Consumption and the Nation". Under each section are thematically related texts on particular cultural contexts. The reading of ethnographic texts on consumption is to be accompanied by critical discussions that locate consumption within the practices of the nation-state-making and global product-marketing.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4867: North Korea: History, Political Economy, Culture

(same as KOREAN 4867; cross-leveled with HIST 7867). The aim of this course is to survey North Korea's history, especially in terms of political economy and culture. Through several themes, we will examine the historical situations of North Korea from its beginnings in the postliberation period to the present, as North Korea undergoes monumental changes.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4870: Southeast Asia Since the Eighteenth Century

The general objective of this course is to introduce students to the fascinating world of Southeast Asia. We will look at the shared history of commodity, cultural, and religious exchanges that gave this region a collective character, as well as explore the historical conditions from which individual modern Southeast Asian state emerged.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4880: Chinese Migration: From Yellow Peril to Model Minority

(cross-leveled with HIST 7880). This course surveys Chines emigration in the global context over the span of five centuries. We will pay special attention to the changing relationships between China and Chinese migrants. Our emphasis will be on history as a process of negotiation and contestation of heterogeneous groups or individuals through creative and selective actives.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4900: Beltway History: American Constitutional Democracy in Theory and Practice

(same as POL_SC 4900). This course is an experiential overview of American political history for students participating in the Kinder Forum's Washington internship program, showing how American constitutional democracy was developed and implemented right here on the Potomac, as much as possible in the actual places where the events occurred. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay between constitutional theory and actual political experience over time, and the tensions and institutional changes that emerged as Americans and their government coped with cataclysmic social changes, unparalleled economic development, and fearsome international challenges.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4904: Historical and Contemporary Slavery

(same as BL_STU 4904). An exploration of slavery in both its historical and contemporary context, focusing on the origins, characteristics, and struggles to abolish the practice. Historical slavery examined using African enslavement in the Americas, and contemporary slavery using human trafficking and forced labor in the developed and developing world.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4910: History in the Public: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Public History

(cross-leveled with HIST 7910). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the world of public history, the central questions and debates in the field, and to offer students the opportunity to practice public history.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4910W: History in the Public An Introduction to the Theory & Practice of Public History - Writing Intensive

(cross-leveled with HIST 7910). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the world of public history, the central questions and debates in the field, and to offer students the opportunity to practice public history.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 4940: Internship in History

Professional training in history and archive-related fields. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4960: Special Readings in History

Individual work, with conferences adjusted to needs of student.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: Department consent required


HIST 4970: Undergraduate Seminar in Third World History

Readings in selected problems in the history of Africa, Asia or Latin America with reports and discussion.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4970W: Undergraduate Seminar in Third World History - Writing Intensive

Readings in selected problems in the history of Africa, Asia or Latin America with reports and discussion.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4971: Undergraduate Seminar in European History

Readings in problems in European history with reports and discussion.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4971W: Undergraduate Seminar in European History - Writing Intensive

Readings in problems in European history with reports and discussion.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4972: Undergraduate Seminar in American History

Readings in selected problems in American history with reports and discussion on selected topics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4972W: Undergraduate Seminar in American History - Writing Intensive

Readings in selected problems in American history with reports and discussion on selected topics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4975: Journal on Constitutional Democracy

(same as POL_SC 4975). The Journal is sponsored by the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy and staffed by current and former participants in the Institute's undergraduate Society of Fellows program. Each volume of the Journal is organized around a student-selected idea or era central to the historical development and philosophical foundations of constitutional democracy in the United States. Student-authored essays address this theme via arguments and historical overviews crafted from the close reading and analysis of primary source documents, with the exception being that participating in the Journal will relate back to and advance students' study of American political thought and history.

Credit Hour: 1-3


HIST 4980: Undergraduate Thesis in History

Individually directed research leading to a senior thesis.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4981: Undergraduate Thesis in History

Continuation of HIST 4980.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4981W: Undergraduate Thesis in History - Writing Intensive

Continuation of HIST 4980.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4995: Honors Thesis in History

Research and completion of the thesis required for graduation with Honors in History.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4995W: Honors Thesis in History - Writing Intensive

Research and completion of the thesis required for graduation with Honors in History.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4996: Honors Thesis in History

Continuation of HIST 4995.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 4996W: Honors Thesis in History - Writing Intensive

Continuation of HIST 4995.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 7000: Age of Jefferson

Political, constitutional, cultural, and economic developments in United States during formative period of Republic, 1787-1828. Special attention to Constitutional Convention, formation of national political institutions.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7004: Topics in History - Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. Graduate students will be expected to complete additional reading and writing assignments commiserate with graduate level course requirements. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 7010: The Age of Jackson

This course will examine American politics, society and culture in the 1820's, 1830's, and 1840's. Considerable attention will be devoted to Andrew Jackson himself, as a figure who both shaped and represented his era, for better or worse.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7020: United states History from 1800-1860

American history from the Jeffersonian "revolution" in 1800 to the election of 1860 focuses on major discussion topics including the War of 1812, Jacksonian democracy, the growth of slavery, westward expansion, reform movements, and the coming of the Civil War.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7030: History of the Old South

Study of the South to 1860.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7040: Slavery and the Crisis of the Union: The American Civil War Era

(cross-leveled with HIST 4040). This class explores the history of the Civil War era, a transformative moment in both U.S. and world history. Our goal is to explore and answer a number of questions of great historical significance: How and why did slavery persist in an age of liberal democracy? Why did the pre-war Union prove unable to tolerate the plural visions and diverse institutions of its people? Was the descent into war more a measure of institutional weakness than of the intensity of moral conflict? What were the constituent elements of the competing wartime 'nationalisms' that evolved in both north and south? How and why did a war that began to restore the Union become one for emancipation? How was it the forerunner of modern, 'total' warfare? Did the governmental, socio-economic and racial changes wrought by war constitute a 'second American revolution'? Were the limits or the achievements of post-war Reconstruction more notable? And, last but certainly not least, how did the triumph of the Union condition the political and economic development of a rapidly globalizing world? Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7050: American Colonial History to 1760

Study of colonial America; special emphasis on creation of a native American culture prior to 1760.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7060: The Period of the American Revolution, 1760-1789

Analysis of the Revolution, its causes and consequences, through establishment of the new government in 1789.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7070: Indians and Europeans in Early America

A study of the cultural, political and often military struggle that took place for control of North America from contact through mid 19th century emphasizing native efforts to resist European domination and expansion in areas that became the U.S. and Canada.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: HIST 1100 or equivalent


HIST 7080: American Foreign Policy from Colonial Times to 1898

(same as PEA_ST 7080).

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7085: Problems in History

(same as S_A_ST 8085). Individual work not leading to dissertation.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


HIST 7100: American Cultural and Intellectual History to 1865

Origins and growth of American values and ideas considered in their social context. Topics include: the work ethic, republican politics, revivalism, reform movements, sexual attitudes, literature in the marketplace, Afro-American and slave-holding subcultures.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7200: American Cultural and Intellectual History Since 1865

Tensions and transformations in American culture to the present. Topics include: spiritual crisis in Christianity; rise of welfare state liberalism; socialist and feminist alternatives; literature and the arts.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7210: Origins of Modern America, 1877-1919

Political, social, economic, and intellectual evolution of America into a modern society, 1877-1918.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7220: U.S. Society Between the Wars 1918-1945

Detailed examination of American history from end of World War I to end of World War II.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7230: Our Times: United States Since 1945

Detailed examination of American history from end of World War II to the present.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7235: The Wire: Race, Urban Inequality, and the "Crisis" of the American City

(cross-leveled with HIST 4235). The HBO series "The Wire", a crime drama based on the border city of Baltimore, exposed the interlocking, structural realities giving shape to the landscapes, neighborhoods, and lived experiences of urban America during the early twenty-first century. Through vivid storytelling, "The Wire" complicates understandings of the "urban crisis" through a focus on the inner workings of major institutions such as the media, public schools, politics, underground economies, public housing, and the criminal justice system and on the ways in which poor and working-class black residents negotiate power and survival. Using the cable series as a lens, this class offers students the opportunity to critically examine the historical, economic, social, and political dimensions of urban inequality. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7240: History of the New South

Study of the South since 1860.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7250: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1898-1945

A history of American Foreign Policy from the Spanish American War to the end of World War II.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7260: The Age of Ascendancy: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1945-Present

(same as PEA_ST 7260). Surveys the Cold War in Europe and Asia, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and Middle East policy.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7270: African-Americans in the Twentieth Century

(same as BL_STU 7270). Surveys the African-American experience from 1900 to the present. Attention is given to economic, political, social, and cultural trends.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7280: America in the Reagan Years

Examines the major political, economic, social, and cultural currents and developments of the "Long Eighties," from Jimmy Carter's "malaise speech" of July 1979 to Bill Clinton's mid-1990s embrace of welfare reform and pronouncement that the era of big government was over.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7310: Adoption Child Welfare and the Family, 1850-present

(same as WGST 7310; cross-leveled with HIST 4310, WGST 4310). This interdisciplinary U.S. history course will address topics such as: changing legal and social meanings of adoption since 1850; historical connections between adoption and poverty, family, gender, race, sexuality, class, fertility, identity; and more recent issues such as transnational adoption.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7410: Introduction to U.S. Social History

Study of daily life and the ways ordinary Americans experienced historical change. Considers such topics as work, leisure, family and community. Compares how people's experiences varied by region, class, gender, ethnicity, and race.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7415: African Americans and American Justice

(same as BL_STU 7415) This course provides opportunities to review and discuss selected court cases and legislation in which black men, women, or children were plaintiffs and defendants or affected by the laws.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7420: American Urban History

Growth, development and implications of the city in American history; historical analysis of urban problems.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7430: The Great West in American History

Historical development of major regions, with emphasis on response to environment, public land policy, role of government in economic and resource development, citizen action, and cultural pluralism.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7440: History of the American Environment

A reading and discussion course exploring diverse responses to the changing American environment from early man to the present, including ecological, institutional, and philosophical aspects.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7470: Quantitative Methods in Historical Study

Introduces quantitative approaches to the study of history. Emphasizes opportunities, limitations, and dangers involved in several common forms of quantitative study.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7480: War Crimes and Genocide

This course will explore the development of international law, international consciousness, and U.S. foreign policy on the two distinct but often related issues of war crimes and genocide during the late 19th and throughout the 20th centuries.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7500: Philip II and Alexander the Great of Macedonia

Concentrates on the history and politics of Greece during reigns of these two kings along with Alexander's military conquests and various controversies from the period.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7510: Crime and Punishment: Law in Classical Athens

Examines the main principles of Athenian law and judicial procedures including history of law code and study of actual speeches from a variety of law suits and procedures.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7515: Power and Oratory in Ancient Greece

Concentrates on the rise of oratory in Greece and how oratory was exploited for political ends. Special attention will be paid to the Athenian Democracy in the fifth and fourth centuries BC.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


HIST 7520: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

(cross-leveled with HIST 7520). Analysis of the downfall of Republican institutions and the origins of autocracy, from the Gracchi to the death of Augustus in A.D. 14.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7530: The Roman Empire

Roman imperialism; management of, and rebellion in, the Empire; cultural exchange between Rome and its provinces.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7540: The Later Roman Empire

Political, religious and cultural life in Late Antiquity, from the "soldier emperors," to the barbarian kingdoms and early Byzantium.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7550: Age of the Vikings

Scandinavia and Scandinavian expansion in the Central Middle Ages. Covers political, economic, religious, and cultural effects of the Viking movement.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: consent required
Recommended: HIST 1500, HIST 1540, HIST 1600 or HIST 2560


HIST 7555: Medieval France

(cross-leveled with HIST 4555). This course covers the area that became the kingdom of France from the end of the Roman era until the end of the Hundred Years War; emphasize on political and cultural developments.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


HIST 7560: The Crusades

Survey of the European crusading movement from its inception in the late eleventh century to its decline during the later Middle Ages.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7570: Intellectual History of Europe, 17th and 18th Centuries

The Enlightenment's attack on traditional Christian thought and values.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7580: The "Making" of Modern Europe: Identity, Culture, Empire

(cross-leveled with HIST 4580).This course will explore some of the ideas, institutions and events that shaped modern Western civilization and thought, focusing on Western Europe, but also giving attention to the relationship between the West and the rest of the world. The course will introduce topics such as the rise of, nationalism, the cult of science, scientific racism and sexism, consumer mass culture, fascist ideology, existentialism, psychoanalysis, the modern city, gender and sexuality. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7610: Early Modern Britain, 1450-1688

Study of English politics, society, economy, culture, and religion during primarily the Tudor and Stuart eras, from the establishment of the Tudor dynasty (1485) through the Glorious Revolution. Emphasis on social and religious history.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7620: Modern England

Surveys British history in the 18th and 19th centuries. Emphasizes social and economic change.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7625: Nature vs. Nurture: The History of a Debate

(cross-leveled with HIST 4625). The purpose of this course is to explore the debate on nature vs. nurture in human society from the late eighteenth century to the present. The goal of the course is to give biology, history, and social science (including journalism) majors a better understanding of how this debate between nature and culture has played out over the past 250 years, and what impact it has left on biology, the social sciences, and public discourse today. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7630: The Age of the Renaissance

Major changes in European economic, social, political, religious, and intellectual life between 1250-1500. Humanism and Renaissance. The "Renaissance problem."

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7640: The Age of the Reformation

State of Europe about 1500. Political, diplomatic, social, and intellectual changes to 1648. Humanistic reform movements. Protestant-Catholic Reformation. Development of the modern state and international relations.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7645: Witchcraft and Witch Hunting in Pre-Modern Europe

(cross-leveled with HIST 4645). The surviving evidence indicates that between 1400 and 1700, at least 50,000 women, men, and children were executed for practicing witchcraft. Is there an explanation for this? Does it make any sense in terms of the intellectual, religious, social, political, and economic contexts of this period in European history? Fundamental to this course are the assumptions that there are many, not one, reasonable explanations for witchcraft beliefs and persecutions, and that when studied in terms of the various historical contexts this phenomenon must be understood as an integral part of European society during these centuries. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7650: Revolutionary France, 1789-1851

Revolutionary upheavals of the revolutionary-Napoleonic era, which destroyed traditional French society and laid the basis for modern France.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7660: European Women in the 20th Century

(same as WGST 7660). Examines the history of European women from World War I to the present. The course focuses on wars, migration, and the changing nature of family, work and community.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7670: From the Holy Roman Empire to the First World War: German History, 1750-1918

(cross-leveled with HIST 4670). Cultural, social and political history of Central Europe from 1800 to 1914. A case study in incomplete modernization, focused on industrialization, unification, cultural crisis and imperialism.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7680: From the Rise of the Nazis to the Fall of the Wall: German History in the Twentieth Century

(cross-leveled with HIST 4680). Cultural, social and political history from 1914 to present day. Focus on world wars, national socialism, the holocaust, the cold war and the emergence of East and West Germany.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7700: Imperial Russia, 1682-1825

Russia in the 18th and early 19th centuries, with special emphasis on the reigns of Peter I, Catherine II, and Alexander I.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7710: The Russian Revolution

Analyzes the transformation of Russian society that produced the collapse of autocracy, efforts to create a parliamentary government, the Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917, and the civil war that followed.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7800: Modern China and Japan: War, Imperialism and Memory

(cross-leveled with HIST 4800). This course examines the interaction between Japan and China since the late nineteenth century in an effort to understand deeper historical reasons behind the rising tension in East Asia at the present time.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7815: African History Through the Digital Medium

(cross-leveled with HIST 4815). This course invites students to explore the history of Africa through the digital medium. It offers a hands-on approach to understand how knowledge about African history, culture, and society is produced and disseminated over the World Wide Web. Prerequisites: Consent of department

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7840: History of the Mongols

In the 13th century, the Mongols went from warring tribes to the largest Eurasian empire in history. This course examines the Mongol tribes, Chinggis Khan's unification of the tribes, the Mongols rapid military victories across Eurasia and their equally rapid decline.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7850: Traversing the Muslim World

The traveler's tale formed an important part of the medieval world's system of knowledge. This writing intensive discussion-based course examines a wide array of the most influential travelers in Muslim lands such as Ibn Fadlan, Ibn Battuta, Benjamin of Tudela and Marco Polo.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7860: Colonial Masculinity/Colonial Frontier

This writing intensive discussion-based course examines how the Indian Army acted as a colonial army in the British Empire, including Africa, the Boxer Rebellion, and the World Wars. Focus is on the role of the Indian Army, impact of the Sepoy Mutiny, and martial race ideology.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7865: Buying Desire: History of Consumption

(cross-leveled with HIST 4865). This course explores the history of consumption practice in various cultural contexts. The course is divided into four parts: "Masses As Consumers", "Selling/Consuming Cultures", "Consumption as (Postcolonial) Modernity", and "Consumption and the Nation". Under each section are thematically related texts on particular cultural contexts. The reading of ethnographic texts on consumption is to be accompanied by critical discussions that locate consumption within the practices of the nation-state-making and global product-marketing. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7867: North Korea: History, Political Economy, Culture

(cross-leveled with HIST 4867). The aim of this course is to survey North Korea's history, especially in terms of political economy and culture. Through several themes, we will examine the historical situations of North Korea from its beginnings in the postliberation period to the present, as North Korea undergoes monumental changes. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7870: Southeast Asia Since the Eighteenth Century

The general objective of this course is to introduce students to the fascinating world of Southeast Asia. We will look at the shared history of commodity, cultural, and religious exchanges that gave this region a collective character, as well as explore the historical conditions from which individual modern Southeast Asian state emerged.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7880: Chinese Migration: From Yellow Peril to Model Minority

(cross-leveled with HIST 4880). This course surveys Chinese emigration in the global context over the span of five centuries. We will pay special attention to the changing relationships between China and Chinese migrants. Our emphasis will be on history as a process of negotiation and contestation of heterogeneous groups or individuals through creative and selective activities.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7910: History in the Public: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Public History

(cross-leveled with HIST 4910). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the world of public history, the central questions and debates in the field, and to offer students the opportunity to practice public history. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 7990: Economic Analysis of Policy & Regulation

(cross-leveled with AG_EC 4990). Apply economic concepts and tools to analyze the policy-making process and the implications of policy for individuals, firms, markets and society. Policy topics include, among other things, agricultural support programs, environmental policy, international trade, international development, and agribusiness regulation.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: Graduate students should have previous coursework in basic econometrics and at least intermediate-level micro economic theory


HIST 8000: Studies in American Colonial History

Readings in American history from beginning of English settlements to adoption of the Constitution. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8001: Seminar in the History of Colonial America

Directed research in the colonial and revolutionary period of American history. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8004: Topics in History-General

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: department consent


HIST 8010: Studies in American Religious History, 1750-1850

This class will examine important ideas and trends in the field, with an emphasis on popular religious movements. This is a reading-based seminar, revolving around discussion of influential recent books. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8015: Seminar in American Religious History

The purpose of this course is for students to write an original work of scholarship, such as might be publishable in an academic journal or serve as a dissertation or book chapter. The field is open to topics in American religious history, including the social, cultural, political and intellectual history of American religion. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8020: Seminar in the Early American Republic

Directed research in the period 1787-1861. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8021: Studies in the Early American Republic

This is an intense reading and discussion course designed to give students a crash course in the historiography of this period (emphasizing political culture) as well as practical experience in assimilating themselves quickly to a field. Students must attend and be prepared to participate knowledgeably in each class section. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8022: Studies in the Age of Jackson 1824-1850

Continuation of HIST 8021, from election of Jackson to Civil War. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8030: Studies in Sectional Controversy, Civil War and Reconstruction

Directed readings and discussions of major issues in the period of national unification of the United States, from 1850 through 1877. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8031: Seminar in United States Sectionalism, Civil War & Reconstruction

Directed original research on political and related topics of the period 1848-1877. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hour: 3-12


HIST 8040: Seminar in Imperial History

Empires have been the predominant organizing political structure in modern world history (c. 1500-2000). Yet historians mostly structure historical inquiry around nations. This graduate class seeks to redress this imbalance by acquainting students with a diverse selection of the modern Anglophone historiography on empire, as well as giving them the opportunity to develop their own research project on an aspect of imperial history of their choosing. This class is reading and writing intensive, as should be expected of graduate students. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8085: Problems in History

Individual work not leading to dissertation.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


HIST 8089: Masters Research in History

Work equal to research done for a dissertation, but not leading to thesis.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


HIST 8090: Masters Research in History

Graded on a S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-99


HIST 8210: Studies in Recent United States History

Critical evaluation of writing in American history in period 1929-present. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8211: Seminar in Recent United States History

Advanced seminar in American history from 1929 to present. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

Credit Hour: 1-12


HIST 8220: Studies in American Religious History, 1850-2000

The purpose of this course is to discuss important ideas and trends in the history of American religion from about 1850-2000. This period is currently one of the richest fields in American historical scholarship, and this is particularly the case for American religious history. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: consent required


HIST 8400: Studies in U.S. Women's History

Reading, discussion, and analysis of the historiography of the field. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8401: Seminar in U.S. Women's History

Directed research and writing in American women's history. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8405: Studies in Gender

Studies in recent research material focused on the analysis of the intersections of gender, race and class in particular times and places. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8406: The Politics of the Body in Historical Perspective

This graduate seminar will launch an investigative inquiry into how the body has been conceptualized in the historical past and how it continues to serve as a site of contention. This course will offer an opportunity to introduce students to the major intellectual debates that guide the study of the body and body-related processes in current scholarship. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8410: Independent Readings for History Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination

Independent readings for Ph.D. Comprehensives.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: Open only to graduate students formally admitted to candidacy for Ph.D. in history


HIST 8415: Studies in African-American History

(same as BL_STU 8415). Readings on selected topics in African-American history from 1619 to the present, with emphasis on conflicting interpretations. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8416: Seminar in African-American History

(same as BL_STU 8416). Directed research in selected topics in African-American history. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8425: Seminar in United States Immigration History

The course will focus on historiography of American immigration, Mainly European immigrants during 1820-1920. Special attention given to books and articles published in the past 25 years. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8432: Studies in Rural Social History of the United States

This course surveys the historiography of rural social history of the United States using a comparative regional perspective and presenting a chronological overview of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8435: Seminar in American Cultural and Intellectual History

Directed research and writing in American cultural and intellectual history. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hour: 1-12


HIST 8436: Studies in American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reading and discussion designed to promote critical understanding of theoretical and historiographical problems in American cultural and intellectual history. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8440: Studies in American Western and Environmental History

Readings, class discussion, and written analysis on topics in American Western and environmental history from early settlement to the present. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8441: Seminar in American Western and Environmental History

Directed research in problems in American Western and environmental history. May be repeated to maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hour: 3-6


HIST 8445: Studies in World Environmental History

Readings explore relationship between human agency and environmental change over the courses of world history and on various continents. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8450: Studies in the History of the South

Group readings and appraisal of controversial interpretations in Southern history. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8455: Studies in the History of American Diplomacy

Readings in evolution of American diplomacy from the Revolution to present. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8456: Seminar in Recent American Diplomatic Problems

Directed research in problems of 20th-century American diplomacy. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8457: Studies in the History of the United States and the World

This graduate seminar will explore the emerging historiographical field known as "The United States and the World", broadly defined to encompass both the history of U.S. foreign policy and other topics like the history of trade, immigration, and cultural exchange. This course will focus on historiography and methodology in order to introduce students to the existing literature, assist in preparation for comprehensive examinations, identify major trends in the field, and suggest directions for future research. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8460: Studies in Trans-Atlantic History

This course examines important historical themes in a trans-Atlantic context. Readings will invite exploration of changes, continuities, contrasts, and causation of similar phenomena on both side of the ocean, in the Americas, Europe, and/or Africa.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8480: Historiography

Acquaints graduate students with examples of modern historical thought and practice by examining various conceptual approaches to the study of history. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 8510: Seminar in Ancient History

Readings and research on selected problems in ancient history. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8511: Studies in Ancient History

Reading of standard works and recent scholarship on selected problems in ancient history. May be repeated a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8531: Studies in English History

Readings in historical literature covering period since 1660; particular reference to new interpretations of political, social developments. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8540: Seminar in Medieval Culture

Investigates cultural developments in the medieval period. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8541: Studies in Medieval History

Readings in medieval history and historiography with emphasis on current scholarship. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8542: Seminar in Medieval Paleography

This course provides an introduction to medieval and Renaissance manuscript-sources and their use as research-tools in a fairly wide variety of sub-fields (e.g., archival study, scholastic text-analysis, vernacular literature). Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent and competence in Latin grammar required


HIST 8550: Seminar in the Renaissance and Reformation

Analyzes problems of the period 1300-1600; emphasizes intellectual history. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8551: Studies in Early Modern European History

Readings in historical classics and current scholarship on Renaissance, Reformation, Baroque, and Enlightenment periods. Problem of modernity. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8570: Studies in Modern European History

Readings in recent research material on selected topics. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 8800: Studies in Latin American History

Readings in standard and recent historical literature, with critical discussion of reports on special topics. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hour: 1-6


HIST 8820: Studies on India in World History

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to major themes of South Asian history as well as to show how South Asian history may be integrated into world history survey course. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: consent of department required


HIST 8830: Studies in Muslim History

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to major themes in Muslim history, to supplement their current studies, and to provide a background necessary to teach surveys in world history, the modern world, or interdisciplinary studies. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


HIST 9089: PhD Research in History

Work equal to research done for a dissertation, but not leading to thesis.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


HIST 9090: PhD Research in History

Graded on a S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-99