Peace Studies (PEA_ST)

PEA_ST 1050: Introduction to Peace Studies

Interdisciplinary overview including theories on the nature of aggression and war, case studies of contemporary conflicts, consideration of various peace proposals, conditions making war or peace likely.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: sophomore standing. Writing intensive not fulfilled unless ENGLSH 1000 or equivalent has already been taken


PEA_ST 1050W: Introduction to Peace Studies - Writing Intensive

Interdisciplinary overview including theories on the nature of aggression and war, case studies of contemporary conflicts, consideration of various peace proposals, conditions making war or peace likely.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: sophomore standing. Writing intensive not fulfilled unless ENGLSH 1000 or equivalent has already been taken


PEA_ST 1051: International Conflict Resolution and Group Reconciliation

Theories of conflict resolution. We will study achieving peace through techniques and institutions that attempt personal and interactive reconciliation of opposing groups personally. Case studies might include the "Truth and Reconciliation" committees following South African Independence, and similar projects to promote inter-group understanding in Middle East conflicts. The course will then analyze examples of the resolution of major international conflicts and issues, such as the Irish Peace Accords, the Camp David peace process for the Middle East, Strategic Nuclear Arms Limitation, and the Kyoto Protocol.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 1051W: International Conflict Resolution and Group Reconciliation - Writing Intensive

Theories of conflict resolution. We will study achieving peace through techniques and institutions that attempt personal and interactive reconciliation of opposing groups personally. Case studies might include the "Truth and Reconciliation" committees following South African Independence, and similar projects to promote inter-group understanding in Middle East conflicts. The course will then analyze examples of the resolution of major international conflicts and issues, such as the Irish Peace Accords, the Camp David peace process for the Middle East, Strategic Nuclear Arms Limitation, and the Kyoto Protocol.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 1052: Global Warming, Climate Change, Catastrophic Climate Destabilization

Global warming, climate change and catastrophic climate destabilization as alternate conceptualizations. The greenhouse gas effect; the consequences of climate change for oceans, fresh water ecosystems, forests, agriculture, biodiversity, public health, social justice and global social stability. Potential solutions will be considered, including sustainable energy sources, efficiency of energy use, divestment from fossil fuels, and putting a price on carbon.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 1052W: Global Warming, Climate Change, Catastrophic Climate Destabilization - Writing Intensive

Global warming, climate change and catastrophic climate destabilization as alternate conceptualizations. The greenhouse gas effect; the consequences of climate change for oceans, fresh water ecosystems, forests, agriculture, biodiversity, public health, social justice and global social stability. Potential solutions will be considered, including sustainable energy sources, efficiency of energy use, divestment from fossil fuels, and putting a price on carbon.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 1120: Population and Ecology

(same as RU_SOC 1120 and SOCIOL 1120). Changes in the structure and characteristics of population groups and their relationship to both human and non-human aspects of the biophysical environment.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 1150: The Amish Community

(same as RU_SOC 1150). Examines historical antecedents and contemporary culture and social structure of the Amish. Topics include cultural symbols, life ceremonies, the family, counter cultural pressures, stresses and social change.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: RU_SOC 1000, SOCIOL 1000, or ANTHRO 1000


PEA_ST 1150W: The Amish Community - Writing Intensive

(same as RU_SOC 1150). Examines historical antecedents and contemporary culture and social structure of the Amish. Topics include cultural symbols, life ceremonies, the family, counter cultural pressures, stresses and social change.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: RU_SOC 1000, SOCIOL 1000, or ANTHRO 1000


PEA_ST 2000: Exploration in Social and Economic Justice

(same as SOC_WK 2000). This course explores issues of fairness and equality in economic, political and social systems, and applies social justice principles to major social problems. May be repeated for credit. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGLSH 1000


PEA_ST 2000W: Exploration in Social and Economic Justice - Writing Intensive

(same as SOC_WK 2000). This course explores issues of fairness and equality in economic, political and social systems, and applies social justice principles to major social problems. May be repeated for credit. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGLSH 1000


PEA_ST 2003: Topics in Peace Studies: Behavioral Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with departmental consent. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 2-3
Recommended: Sophomore standing


PEA_ST 2003W: Topics in Peace Studies: Behavioral Science - Writing Intensive

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with departmental consent. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 2-3
Recommended: Sophomore standing


PEA_ST 2004: Topics in Peace Studies - Social Sciences

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 2-3
Recommended: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 2005: Topics in Peace Studies - Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with departmental consent. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 2-3
Recommended: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 2016: Authoritarian Societies, States, and the Prospects for Democracy

The course analyzes and critiques current authoritarian tendencies in civil society and the state, in politics, economy, culture, and individually experienced social life. It will synthesize varied approaches and theories from several disciplines, and will place developments in the US and other nations in historical and multicultural context. Topics may include: authoritarian racism and social control, movements and resistance against authoritarianism, mobilization through mass and social media, and authoritarianism as a global phenomena.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2100: The Vietnam and Iraq Wars: Lessons for the Future

An interdisciplinary analysis of the Vietnam War and the American-led war with Iraq. Course focuses on the reasons that American lost in Vietnam, the reasons it won in Iraq, and the lessons these conflicts provided for America's future. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 2140: ART: Visual Culture and The Iconography of Social Intent

The focus of the course is to encourage students to view and discuss visual arts in an informed manner. The course will also raise key issues in the humanities, such as how certain artists reflect upon and explore the cultural, social and historical impact of human agency. Provided is a basic review of the visual arts during selected time periods of the past, along with an emphasis on creative responses by modern and post-modern artists to the changing socio-economic and cultural landscape of the present day. The influence, manipulation, and oftentimes, conflictual aspects of the arts, will be discussed together with an appropriate overview of context, and vocabulary. Students will come to recognize and appreciate art's intriguing versatility, and the power of art "to integrate individual and communal needs" (Dissanayake, 2000).

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2182: Critical Dialogues: Nonviolence in Peace/Democracy Movements

(same as SOCIOL 2182). History and theory of movements for peace, justice, and democracy. Development of violent and nonviolent tactics and factions in movements; relationship to state authority. Cases such as Gandhi's Independence, American Civil Rights, Arab Spring, and Occupy movements.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: PEA_ST 1050


PEA_ST 2182W: Critical Dialogues: Nonviolence in Peace/Democracy Movements - Writing Intensive

(same as SOCIOL 2182). History and theory of movements for peace, justice, and democracy. Development of violent and nonviolent tactics and factions in movements; relationship to state authority. Cases such as Gandhi's Independence, American Civil Rights, Arab Spring, and Occupy movements.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: PEA_ST 1050 or instructor's consent


PEA_ST 2200: Nuclear Weapons: Environmental, Health and Social Effects

(same as HLTH_SCI 2200 and SOCIOL 2281). Environmental consequences of the nuclear arms race, "regional" nuclear war, and weapons testing for human health, agriculture, and society. Examining "a world without nuclear weapons"; political dialogue on proliferation; Iran, North Korea, and nuclear weapons conventions. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2200W: Nuclear Weapons: Environmental, Health and Social Effects-Writing Intensive

(same as HLTH_SCI 2200 and SOCIOL 2281). Environmental consequences of the nuclear arms race, "regional" nuclear war, and weapons testing for human health, agriculture, and society. Examining "a world without nuclear weapons"; political dialogue on proliferation; Iran, North Korea, and nuclear weapons conventions. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2220: America in the 1960's

(same as HIST 2220). Examines the political and cultural main currents of the 1960s. Emphasizes the challenges mounted by protest groups and the responses of America's political leadership to the ferment of the period.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 2255: Youth, Islam, and Global Cultures

(same as SOCIOL 2255). Youth subcultures and the social issues and problems faced by youth, focusing on the Islamic world and Muslim immigrants, in the United States and elsewhere. Social and behavioral theories and concepts such as paths to modernization, Orientalism, post-colonialism, population movements, social construction, identity, and recognition will be illustrated.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2280: Race, Democracy, and Violence in Cuba and Haiti

(same as SOCIOL 2280, GEOG 2280). A sociological approach to understand race/ethnicity, identity, citizenship, human rights, violence, and political and economic systems in the Caribbean. Comparisons of the culture, politics, and historical trajectories of Cuba and Haiti using Post-Colonial and Feminist theories. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2280W: Race, Democracy, and Violence in Cuba and Haiti - Writing Intensive

(same as SOCIOL 2280, GEOG 2280). A sociological approach to understand race/ethnicity, identity, citizenship, human rights, violence, and political and economic systems in the Caribbean. Comparisons of the culture, politics, and historical trajectories of Cuba and Haiti using Post-Colonial and Feminist theories. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2285: Large Corporations, Economic Crisis, Social Responsibility

(same as SOCIOL 2285). Institutional power of the corporate CEO; ethical regulatory restraint. Historical contexts of economic crisis. Theories of justice, alternative concepts of justice in popular culture. Politics of policy issues in prosecution and criminalization of corporate behavior. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2286: Technological Futures, National Security, and Civil Liberties

(same as SOCIOL 2286).Contemporary practices and future trends in data collection and mining by the NSA and by businesses. The interplay of government and corporate power, and possibilities of regulation and maintenance of privacy and civil liberties. The development of digital intellectual copyright and its consequences on patterns of dissemination of knowledge.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2286W: Technological Futures, National Security, and Civil Liberties - Writing Intensive

(same as SOCIOL 2286).Contemporary practices and future trends in data collection and mining by the NSA and by businesses. The interplay of government and corporate power, and possibilities of regulation and maintenance of privacy and civil liberties. The development of digital intellectual copyright and its consequences on patterns of dissemination of knowledge.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2287: Conspiracies, Popular Imagination, Evidence

In-depth and critical analysis of cases involving allegations of "conspiracy" in international affairs, contrasted with official reports and presentations of evidence in a variety of venues. Conspiracy theories considered might include those centering on 9-11 and the Kennedy assassination. Conspiracy theories will be compared and contrasted to what is known about secrecy and the functioning of elite political and economic institutions such as the Trilateral Commission and campaign financing organizations. Students will analyze a variety of NGO and government documents and investigative journalism drawing on Wiki Leaks. We will compare and contrast what is considered evidence in different venues such as the criminal justice system, government reports, journalism, and academic writing by historians, social and behavioral scientists, and natural scientists. Concepts clarified and utilized will include: state corporate crime, system determination, social construction, narrative, historical memory, symbolic politics, and individual and group responsibility.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2287W: Conspiracies, Popular Imagination, Evidence - Writing Intensive

In-depth and critical analysis of cases involving allegations of "conspiracy" in international affairs, contrasted with official reports and presentations of evidence in a variety of venues. Conspiracy theories considered might include those centering on 9-11 and the Kennedy assassination. Conspiracy theories will be compared and contrasted to what is known about secrecy and the functioning of elite political and economic institutions such as the Trilateral Commission and campaign financing organizations. Students will analyze a variety of NGO and government documents and investigative journalism drawing on Wiki Leaks. We will compare and contrast what is considered evidence in different venues such as the criminal justice system, government reports, journalism, and academic writing by historians, social and behavioral scientists, and natural scientists. Concepts clarified and utilized will include: state corporate crime, system determination, social construction, narrative, historical memory, symbolic politics, and individual and group responsibility.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2288: Sports, Protest Movements, and Conflict Resolution

This course will critically analyze the social significance of sports, focusing on events leading to and influencing protest movements and the peaceful outcomes (or lack thereof)of these movements through conflict resolution. We will identify the non-violent behaviors, strategies, and ideologies of numerous athletes such as: Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, Harry Edwards, John Carlos and Tommy Smith, Colin Kaepernick, and their particular methods of rebellion and representation of issues. Furthermore, we will examine how fans, organizations, media, and sporting committees (i.e. International Olympic Committee) have reacted to athlete revolts, and the effectiveness of revolts in changing society.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2288W: Sports, Protest Movements, and Conflict Resolution - Writing Intensive

This course will critically analyze the social significance of sports, focusing on events leading to and influencing protest movements and the peaceful outcomes (or lack thereof)of these movements through conflict resolution. We will identify the non-violent behaviors, strategies, and ideologies of numerous athletes such as: Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, Harry Edwards, John Carlos and Tommy Smith, Colin Kaepernick, and their particular methods of rebellion and representation of issues. Furthermore, we will examine how fans, organizations, media, and sporting committees (i.e. International Olympic Committee) have reacted to athlete revolts, and the effectiveness of revolts in changing society.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2289: Towns in Missouri and the Midwest: Voices and Inequalities

(same as GEOG 2289, RU_SOC 2289). Focusing on towns and communities and their regional history and cultural traditions, we will examine the issues and concerns of small town America in the context of recent hardships and adverse economic trends. Examples of topics to be covered include case studies of communities such as Marceline, Missouri (Walt Disney's boyhood home), race and the immigration of non-whites in to rural areas; gender roles in small communities, the role of religion in small-town identity formation, and other current issues faced by "middle America". The responsiveness of government, large corporations, and institutions to the problems of diverse communities will be critically examined, with a multidisciplinary approach that will draw on key theories and works in the disciplines of sociology, rural sociology, community development, and geography.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2289W: Towns in Missouri and the Midwest: Voices and Inequalities - Writing Intensive

Focusing on towns and communities and their regional history and cultural traditions, we will examine the issues and concerns of small town America in the context of recent hardships and adverse economic trends. Examples of topics to be covered include case studies of communities such as Marceline, Missouri (Walt Disneys boyhood home), race and the immigration of non-whites in to rural areas; gender roles in small communities, the role of religion in small-town identity formation, and other current issues faced by middle America. The responsiveness of government, large corporations, and institutions to the problems of diverse communities will be critically examined, with a multidisciplinary approach that will draw on key theories and works in the disciplines of sociology, rural sociology, community development, and geography.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2290: Drugs, Violence and the Police in Latin America and Latina/o Communities in the United States

A regional and global perspective on the "war on drugs" and violence in Latin American countries such as Mexico and Colombia, as well as the United States. The course may include units on such topics as: the recent history of gangs in US urban areas; political violence in Central America and such countries as Colombia and Venezuela; and attempts to mediate and reconcile social conflicts and war in those areas. The interplay between gangs, drug policies, policing, and citizens' action and protests in major cities of the hemisphere, such as in Argentina and Brazil. Drugs, policing, gangs, and violence as a symbolic and hot button issue in domestic politics, and the consequences for public policy and the character of the discourse about public policy.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2291: Information Technology: Facilitation and Constraint for the Creative Mind

This course will enable students to evaluate contrasting interpretations by leading thinkers about the development of information technologies, the internet, and robotics and artificial intelligence. Current debates will be covered; topics might include: views that social media are constraining the development of human relationships (Turkel); that commercialization of the internet reduces its function to attention getting (Wu); that automation degrades the humanity of work (Carr) and restricts the pay for producing creative content (Lanier). On the other hand, the course will consider arguments that human mind can be reverse reengineered to advance a new era of artificially intelligent machines (Kurzweil). Current theories of information technology and society will be grounded in the multidisciplinary thinking about mind, intelligence, art, and work.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2292: Internet Identities, and the Clash of Global Countercultures and Oppositional Cultures

This course problematizes the development of individual and group identities on the internet and social media due to their multiple, global, shallow, shifting, segmented, and conflictual character. We emphasize a multidisciplinary examination of the internet presentation of diverse identities such as those of the 1960s counter-culture, the Christian right, militias, the alt-right, rural towns, terrorist cells, and life-style and sectarian political and religious groups. We will also examine the processes of publicity and celebrity in the creation of personal identities such as "entrepreneur" (Bill Gates and Steve Jobs), "geek", "hacker," and anonymous, and the development of internet technologies and personal identities in the context of commercialism and ideals such as freedom and rebellion. The intersection of personal, work, and professional identities will be considered. Sources will include autobiography, biography, and literature on such topics as diaspora, borders, Empire, and exile.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2293: Globalization, Identity and Citizenship

(same as GEOG 2293, POL_SC 2293). This course examines the forces of globalization that are transforming our world, and explores the various responses -- psychological, social and political -- that people have been making over the past fifty years. Part I examines globalization as an economic and geographical process, generating huge social consequences, with rapid growth, population movements, political change and a vast gap between global wealth and poverty. Part II focuses on the ways in which individuals are now seeking to find themselves in this globalizing world. Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which national identity, faith, gender and sexuality are emerging as key loci around which contemporary people (especially young people) are trying to forge new social identities for themselves. The course will conclude by examining the recently emerging (and highly contested) concept of 'global citizenship'. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2293W: Globalization, Identity and Citizenship - Writing Intensive

(same as GEOG 2293W, POL_SC 2293W). This course examines the forces of globalization that are transforming our world, and explores the various responses -- psychological, social and political -- that people have been making over the past fifty years. Part I examines globalization as an economic and geographical process, generating huge social consequences, with rapid growth, population movements, political change and a vast gap between global wealth and poverty. Part II focuses on the ways in which individuals are now seeking to find themselves in this globalizing world. Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which national identity, faith, gender and sexuality are emerging as key loci around which contemporary people (especially young people) are trying to forge new social identities for themselves. The course will conclude by examining the recently emerging (and highly contested) concept of 'global citizenship'. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2320: Literature of Spanish Civil War

(same as SPAN 2320). Study of the Spanish Civil War: History, Politics, Literature. May not be included in the area of concentration in Spanish.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 2321: Germany in War and Peace: Division and Unity 1945-89

This course will compare notions of war and peace in East (German Democratic Republic) and West Germany (Federal Republic of Germany), 1945-1989. In particular, there are three main ways to think about war and peace: 1. Dealing with the Nazi past; 2. Dealing with the Cold War present; Negotiating violence and peace within various dissent and peace movements.

Credit Hour: 2-3


PEA_ST 2410: Philosophies of War and Peace

(same as PHIL 2410). Moral issues about the recourse to war by the nation and the individual's obligations to participate. The nature of peace, social and personal. Special attention to the Vietnam War and the nuclear age.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2410W: Philosophies of War and Peace - Writing Intensive

(same as PHIL 2410). Moral issues about the recourse to war by the nation and the individual's obligations to participate. The nature of peace, social and personal. Special attention to the Vietnam War and the nuclear age.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2550: Human Rights, Law, War and Peace

Interdisciplinary exploration of how human rights, law, war and peace are connected through an analysis of various theories and contemporary examples, which may include issues regarding citizenship in the United States today, the regulation of economic markets in the U.S. today, state surveillance, the military industrial complex, the manner in which gender affects the experience of warfare and individuals

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2600: CAFO: Concentrated Animals, Deep Ecology

Throughout the ages humans have toiled and tilled the land confirming their role as integral providers as well as graceful recipients of nature's bounty. The significant metamorphosis that this gentle and cautious stewardship of the earth has undergone, necessitates close scrutiny. This multi-disciplined humanities course will consider the prose of the human community as it intersects widespread industrialized animal production with its inevitable social, economic and environmental realities. Eco-Feminist readings and the Fine Arts with its theoretical underpinnings associated with a liberal arts aesthetic will invite a wider perspective.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2600W: CAFO: Concentrated Animals, Deep Ecology - Writing Intensive

Throughout the ages humans have toiled and tilled the land confirming their role as integral providers as well as graceful recipients of nature's bounty. The significant metamorphosis that this gentle and cautious stewardship of the earth has undergone, necessitates close scrutiny. This multi-disciplined humanities course will consider the prose of the human community as it intersects widespread industrialized animal production with its inevitable social, economic and environmental realities. Eco-Feminist readings and the Fine Arts with its theoretical underpinnings associated with a liberal arts aesthetic will invite a wider perspective.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 2810: Think Global: Fundamentals of Globalization and Digital Technologies

(same as JOURN 3510, GERMAN 3510, DST 3510, T_A_M 3010). This interdepartmental course serves as one of the core seminars for students pursuing the undergraduate Certificate in Digital Global Studies. The course focuses on the impact of technological change and globalization on cultures around the world from various interdisciplinary perspectives. The course is open to students in any discipline. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or instructor's consent


PEA_ST 2810HW: Think Global: Fundamentals of Globalization and Digital Technologies - Honors - Writing Intensive

(same as GERMAN 3510HW, T_A_M 3010HW, JOURN 3510HW). This interdepartmental course serves as one of the core seminars for students pursuing the undergraduate Certificate in Digital Global Studies. The course focuses on the impact of technological change and globalization on cultures around the world from various interdisciplinary perspectives. The course is open to students in any discipline. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing required and 2.75 GPA. Honors eligibility required


PEA_ST 2810W: Think Global: Fundamentals of Globalization and Digital Technologies - Writing Intensive

(same as JOURN 3510W, T_A_M 3010W, GERMAN 3510W, DST 3510W). This interdepartmental course serves as one of the core seminars for students pursuing the undergraduate Certificate in Digital Global Studies. The course focuses on the impact of technological change and globalization on cultures around the world from various interdisciplinary perspectives. The course is open to students in any discipline. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or instructor's consent


PEA_ST 3003: Topics in Peace Studies - Behavioral Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with departmental consent.

Credit Hour: 2-3
Recommended: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 3005: Topics in Peace Studies - Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with departmental consent. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 3005H: Topics in Peace Studies - Humanities - Honors

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with departmental consent. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing. Honors eligibility required


PEA_ST 3140: Art of War and Peace

Exploration of selected visual art pieces and consideration of humanistic concerns during times of war and peace from various perspectives including a peace studies perspective. Viewing and discussing art within varied selected historical and cultural contexts that generated the imagery. Includes visits to studios and galleries. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hour: 2-3


PEA_ST 3230H: Terrorism and Conflict Resolution - Honors

Religious, ethnic, ideological movements; state and international reactions. Case studies from South America, Europe, Africa, Asia. Identifying problems, possible resolution. Dramatized thru discussions, documentaries, role-playing; short term paper, exams.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


PEA_ST 3280: Internship in Peace Studies

Students work in a peace-related agency or institution for 1 to 3 credit hours. Repeatable for maximum of 6 hours. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: departmental consent


PEA_ST 3330: Environmental Justice

(same as SOCIOL 3330). Environmental justice refers to the ways in which the "cost and benefits" of modern industrial society are distributed among social groups. This course is concerned with justice, not as an abstract concept, and inequality not in terms of numbers in a bank account. Social justice or inequality are lived, embodied experiences. An individual's likelihood of experiencing environmental harm is related to intersecting gender, race and class formations, among other things. Justice or inequality is not only embodied, it also happens in places--national and regional differences matter. In this course we will look at some of the extensive literature documenting the ways in which communities of color and poor communities are subject to disproportionate environmental risks. In addition, we will focus on gender as an important category in understanding environmental inequality. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3350: Readings in Peace Studies

Students may receive 1 to 3 credit hours for doing readings and research in a particular area of peace studies. At least one paper will be required. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours.

Credit Hour: 1-3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


PEA_ST 3400: Politics of the Media

(same as SOCIOL 3400). We look at the history and viability of the public sphere in the United States and the integral role of the media to its vitality. We analyze the impact of current trends toward media concentration and debate related issues of bias, censorship, and social control.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3400W: Politics of the Media - Writing Intensive

(same as SOCIOL 3400). We look at the history and viability of the public sphere in the United States and the integral role of the media to its vitality. We analyze the impact of current trends toward media concentration and debate related issues of bias, censorship, and social control.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3401: Global Public Health and Health Care Systems

(Same as HLTH_SCI 3400). An introduction to public health in a global context, with an emphasis on understanding how disparities in socioeconomic status, differences in political and national health care systems and the work of international organizations impact health in communities around the world. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3496: Digital Indigenous Studies

(same as GEOG 3496). This course introduces students to Indigenous studies in a digital world. The course begins with study of Indigenous sovereignty and representation, and moves quickly to critical and theoretical readings in new media, tracing both the historical impact of digital technologies (such as GIS) on Native communities, and the ways that both urban and rural Native communities have engaged in innovative digital projects that expand the way we understand information and storytelling in digital environments. The course materials will cover a wide range of platforms and audio-visual genres, from documentary, community video, and animation productions, to GIS, video games, and social media sites. Students will engage with both scholars and artists working with new media through a program of public lectures, classroom visits, and Skype interviews. All interview will be archived as podcasts from the course website. Students will write weekly short response papers and produce independent audio-visual projects over the course of the semester, with opportunities to revise their work leading up to substantial final projects. The course will also integrate community outreach into the curriculum through online participation of students from the Kiowa Kids, an Indigenous language immersion and storytelling program.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3496H: Digital Indigenous Studies - Honors

(same as GEOG 3496H). This course introduces students to Indigenous studies in a digital world. The course begins with study of Indigenous sovereignty and representation, and moves quickly to critical and theoretical readings in new media, tracing both the historical impact of digital technologies (such as GIS) on Native communities, and the ways that both urban and rural Native communities have engaged in innovative digital projects that expand the way we understand information and storytelling in digital environments. The course materials will cover a wide range of platforms and audio-visual genres, from documentary, community video, and animation productions, to GIS, video games, and social media sites. Students will engage with both scholars and artists working with new media through a program of public lectures, classroom visits, and Skype interviews. All interview will be archived as podcasts from the course website. Students will write weekly short response papers and produce independent audio-visual projects over the course of the semester, with opportunities to revise their work leading up to substantial final projects. The course will also integrate community outreach into the curriculum through online participation of students from the Kiowa Kids, an Indigenous language immersion and storytelling program. Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3496W: Digital Indigenous Studies - Writing Intensive

(same as GEOG 3496). This course introduces students to Indigenous studies in a digital world. The course begins with study of Indigenous sovereignty and representation, and moves quickly to critical and theoretical readings in new media, tracing both the historical impact of digital technologies (such as GIS) on Native communities, and the ways that both urban and rural Native communities have engaged in innovative digital projects that expand the way we understand information and storytelling in digital environments. The course materials will cover a wide range of platforms and audio-visual genres, from documentary, community video, and animation productions, to GIS, video games, and social media sites. Students will engage with both scholars and artists working with new media through a program of public lectures, classroom visits, and Skype interviews. All interview will be archived as podcasts from the course website. Students will write weekly short response papers and produce independent audio-visual projects over the course of the semester, with opportunities to revise their work leading up to substantial final projects. The course will also integrate community outreach into the curriculum through online participation of students from the Kiowa Kids, an Indigenous language immersion and storytelling program.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3520: Collective Behavior

(same as SOCIOL 3520). Analysis of crowd behavior and related phenomena: rumors, disasters, fashions. Social responses to unclear, dangerous or unjust conditions. The dynamics of conflict, consensus and change.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3520W: Collective Behavior - Writing Intensive

(same as SOCIOL 3520). Analysis of crowd behavior and related phenomena: rumors, disasters, fashions. Social responses to unclear, dangerous or unjust conditions. The dynamics of conflict, consensus and change.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3521: Group Decision Making Processes

(same as COMMUN 3571). Procedures and techniques for interpersonal communication and decision making in small groups.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 3522: New Media, Conflict and Control

(same as SOCIOL 3522) This course will explore the increasing role of new media tools in conflict and surveillance. Examples from recent conflicts will illustrate how citizens and regimes use new media to communicate, report, mobilize, monitor, and/or control. Students will utilize new media as they research instances of democracy and control.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3600: Criminology

(same as SOCIOL 3600). Sociology of law; constitutional, psychological, sociological theories of criminal behavior; process of criminal justice; treatment of corrections; control of crime.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3610: Ireland, 1100s to 1850

(same as HIST 3610). Ireland, from Conquest to Famine: Ireland's history as the first British Colony, from the conquests of the 1100s and 1500s-1600s to the Irish rebellion of 1798 and the Great Famine and mass emigration of 1845-50.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 3611: Ireland, 1850-1923

(same as HIST 3611). Ireland, from Famine to Partition: Irish history from the Great Famine of 1845-50 to the revolutions of 1916-23 that brought partial independence from Britain but partitioned Ireland into two hostile and trouble states.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 3612: Ireland, 1920-Present

(same as HIST 3612). Ireland, from Partition to the Present: After surveying the conflicts that led to Irish revolution and partition in 1916-23, the course focuses on the development of post partition Ireland and Northern Ireland, and on the violence that has scarred Northern Ireland since the 1960s.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: HIST 3610 and/or HIST 3611


PEA_ST 3780: World Political Geography

(same as GEOG 3780). Geographic factors in the development of political boundaries traditions, and societal perspectives. Spatial patterns and geopolitical processes are explored in selected regions of the world.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: GEOG 1100 or GEOG 1200 or sophomore standing


PEA_ST 3870: Social Revolution in Latin America

(same as HIST 3870 and SOCIOL 3870).Twentieth century social revolutions in selected Latin American countries.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 4003: Topics in Peace Studies - Behavioral Sciences

Upperclass Topics. Subject may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing required


PEA_ST 4005: Topics in Peace Studies: Humanities

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with departmental consent. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hour: 2-6
Recommended: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 4080: American Foreign Policy from Colonial Times to 1898

(same as HIST 4080).

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 4230: Women, Development and Globalization

(same as SOCIOL 4230 and WGST 4230 and BL_STU 4230). Examines the history and structure of "development" discourse and practices. Stresses the interconnections and impact on women globally. Reviews women's strategies in defining and instituting programs to improve quality of life in communities.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: BL_STU 1332 or BL_STU 2200; SOCIOL 2200, WGST 1332 or WGST 2010


PEA_ST 4240: Theory and Practice of Theatre of the Oppressed

(same as THEATR 4240; cross-leveled with PHIL 7240, THEATR 7240). Theory and practice of Augusto Boal's liberatory interactive theatre process, including application of techniques of specific social issues.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


PEA_ST 4260: The Age of Ascendancy: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1945-Present

(same as HIST 4260). Surveys the Cold War in Europe and Asia, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and Middle East policy.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


PEA_ST 4287: Empire: Intellectual History, Literature, and Society

(same as REL_ST 4287; cross-leveled with PEA_ST 7287). Intellectuals and writers passionately debated the wisdom of colonies, free trade, and war as economies became increasingly global over the centuries. The proponents, critics, and interpreters of Empire will offer us rich examples of themes and theories in the culture of specific nations and eras. Intellectual life will be studied in the context of developments in social inequality, the culture of classes, media of communication, education, identities, transnational governance, and the nation-state. The course will be offered with different national and historical foci under different instructors, and may be repeated for credit with different instructors. Counts as the capstone experience for Peace Studies and is open to majors of other disciplines.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing
Recommended: senior standing


PEA_ST 4288: Law and Society: Corporate and White Collar Crime and Malfeasance

(cross-leveled with PEA_ST 7288). Instances of corporate crime and ethical misconduct analyzed through major theories of the sociology of law including critical legal studies, Legal Realism, sociological jurisprudence, collective representation theory, state- corporate crime, rationalization of legal institutions/ critical theory, and post-structuralism. Cases to be analyzed might include mortgage lending fraud and malpractice, insider trading, pyramid schemes, the Erie Railroad scandals, and Enron, Worldcom, Tyco, and other instances in the hi tech collapse of 2001. Other topics: Corporate crime in the media and in novels and popular culture, appropriate sentencing, global corporate crime.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: at least junior standing
Recommended: senior standing, 3.0 or above GPA, interest in graduate school


PEA_ST 4331: Nonproliferation Issues for Weapons of Mass Destruction

(same as NU_ENG 4331). Nonproliferation impact on technology and world events.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing


PEA_ST 4331W: Nonproliferation Issues for Weapons of Mass Destruction - Writing Intensive

(same as NU_ENG 4331). Nonproliferation impact on technology and world events.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing required or instructor's consent


PEA_ST 4410: Politics and War

(same as POL_SC 4410). Why do wars occur? The function of force and uses of a threat of force. Problems of national security strategy and arms control.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 4520: Political Sociology

(same as SOCIOL 4520). Social bases of power and politics, economic and political elites, the political economy of the advanced societies, sources of political conflict and change. MA core course.

Credit Hours: 3
Recommended: SOCIOL 3200, SOCIOL 3510, SOCIOL 3520, or SOCIOL 3700


PEA_ST 4550: Gender and Human Rights in Cross Cultural Perspective

(same as WGST 4550 and SOCIOL 4550). This course focuses on the global discourse on human rights and gender, emphasizing cross-cultural theories. Course includes the meaning of rights, Western and nonwestern perspectives, feminist contributions, important substantive debates, violations, policymaking and activism.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: WGST 1120 or SOCIOL 2200; senior standing required


PEA_ST 4600: Political and Social Philosophy

(same as PHIL 4600). Contemporary and/or historical theories of justice and the state. Utilitarianism, liberalism, libertarianism, Marxism, Communitarianism and feminism may be among the views covered.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing or instructor's consent
Recommended: two courses in Philosophy


PEA_ST 4810: Case Studies in an Inter/Multicultural World

(same as GERMAN 4810,T_A_M 4810, DST 4805). This inter-departmental course examines the ways in which people across the globe are affected every day by an unprecedented array of linkages that defy geographic and political boundaries. Also serves as one of the seminars for the certificate in Digital Global Studies. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; 2.75 GPA or instructor's consent


PEA_ST 4970: Senior Thesis I

Senior essay on a Peace Studies topic requiring major research.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: PEA_ST 1050, senior standing, and instructor's consent


PEA_ST 4980: Peace Studies Abroad - Social Sciences

A study abroad experience organized by MU and led by MU faculty. Provides students with interdisciplinary study in foreign cultures, career development, and global experience with issues such as war, domestic conflict, sustainable development, human rights, and nonviolent movements for peace and justice. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hour: 3-6


PEA_ST 7240: Theory and Practice of Theatre of the Oppressed

(same as THEATR 7240; cross-leveled with PEA_ST 4240, THEATR 4240). Theory and practice of Augusto Boal's liberatory interactive theatre process, including application of techniques of specific social issues.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


PEA_ST 7287: Empire: Intellectual History, Literature, and Society

(same as REL_ST 7287; cross-leveled with PEA_ST 4287). Intellectuals and writers passionately debated the wisdom of colonies, free trade, and war as economies became increasingly global over the centuries. The proponents, critics, and interpreters of Empire will offer us rich examples of themes and theories in the culture of specific nations and eras. Intellectual life will be studied in the context of developments in social inequality, the culture of classes, media of communication, education, identites, transnational governance, and the nation-state. The course will be offered with different national and historical foci under different instructors, and may be repeated for credit with different instructors. Counts as the capstone experience for Peace Studies and is open to majors of other disciplines.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 7288: Law and Society: Corporate and White Collar Crime and Malfeasance

(cross-leveled with PEA_ST 4288). Instances of corporate crime and ethical misconduct analyzed through major theories of the sociology of law including critical legal studies, Legal Realism, sociological jurisprudence, collective representation theory, state-corporate crime, rationalization of legal institutions/ critical theory, and post-structuralism. Cases to be analyzed might include mortgage lending fraud and malpractice, insider trading, pyramid schemes, the Erie Railroad scandals, and Enron, Worldcom, Tyco, and other instances in the hi tech collapse of 2001. Other topics: Corporate crime in the media and in novels and popular culture, appropriate sentencing, global corporate crime.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 7550: Gender and Human Rights in Cross Cultural Perspective

(same as SOCIOL 7750 or WGST 7550). Focuses on the global discourse on human rights and gender, emphasizing cross-cultural theories. Course includes the meaning of human rights, western and nonwestern perspectives, feminist contributions, important substantive debates, violations, policymaking and activism.

Credit Hours: 3


PEA_ST 7980: Peace Studies Abroad

A study abroad experience organized by MU and led by MU faculty. Provides students with interdisciplinary study in foreign cultures, career development, and global experience with issues such as war, domestic conflict, sustainable development, human rights, and nonviolent movements for peace and justice. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hour: 3-6