Political Science (POL_SC)

POL_SC 1004: Topics in Political Science - Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-3


POL_SC 1100: American Government

Topics covered include Constitution, federalism, civil liberties, political attitudes, interest groups, political parties, nominations, elections, and campaigns, voting behavior, Congress, Presidency, bureaucracy, and judiciary. Meets state law requirement.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 1100H: American Government - Honors

Topics covered include Constitution, federalism, civil liberties, political attitudes, interest groups, political parties, nominations, elections, and campaigns, voting behavior, Congress, Presidency, bureaucracy, and judiciary. Meets state law requirement.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


POL_SC 1400: International Relations

Contemporary international affairs including family of nations, control of national foreign policies, competition and cooperation in legal, political, economic, social fields.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 1400H: International Relations - Honors

Contemporary international affairs including family of nations, control of national foreign policies, competition and cooperation in legal, political, economic, social fields.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required


POL_SC 2004: Topics in Political Science - Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit may vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-3


POL_SC 2100: State Government

Government and politics at the state level, with emphasis on Missouri. Meets state law constitutional requirement.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 2200: The Judicial Process

Analysis of roles played by American judges and courts in democratic policy formation.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 2445: American Constitutional Democracy

(same as HIST 2445) This course offers an introduction to American consitutional democracy. On the one hand, this course will strive to set the development of America's constitutional democracy into its historical context and to explain it in relation to larger social, political, military, and economic events. A second emphasis is on the nature and character of the American democratic system. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 2450: The Intellectual World of the American Founders

This course demonstrates that truly understanding the American constitutional and democratic traditions begins with acknowledging and studying how, in framing the Constitution and in imagining the new nation, the Founders drew on the work and cobbled together the ideas of thinkers from multiple eras and continents and, moreover, thinkers of vastly different political ideologies and disciplinary expertise.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 2450H: The Intellectual World of the American Founders - Honors

This course demonstrates that truly understanding the American constitutional and democratic traditions begins with acknowledging and studying how, in framing the Constitution and in imagining the new nation, the Founders drew on the work and cobbled together the ideas of thinkers from multiple eras and continents and, moreover, thinkers of vastly different political ideologies and disciplinary expertise.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100; Honors eligibility required


POL_SC 2455: Constitutional Debates

While we will make reference to the work of canonical political thinkers from the Western tradition during the semester--and while we will also, at times, take a broadly philosophical approach to describing certain of the Founders' theses on governance--this is not a course in "high theory." Instead, our examination of the process of drafting and ratifying the United States Constitution will be more pragmatic in nature, focusing on the practical problems and questions concerning national governance that shaped the final design of the Constitution.At the same time, this description of the class as one that addresses the Constitution in terms of the practical problems that the Founders saw it solving drastically understates the complexity and contentiousness of the subject matter that we will be examining. Specifically, the readings for the course will allow us to identify the ways in which, and reasons for which, the Founders disagreed not only on how to solve the problems of governance that the nation faced in 1787 but, moreover, on what these problems actually were. With regard to this task of understanding the principles underlying the heated debates that arose during the drafting and ratification process, it should be noted that this is not a class in Framer-worship. While we will discuss why the Federalists ultimately "won the day," we will also devote significant attention to how the Anti-Federalists both profoundly influenced how we understand constitutional democracy in the United States and provided an intellectual lineage that still informs contemporary political debate. We will, that is, give each side their due. In addition, we will conclude the semester by considering the Constitution's post-ratification history, looking at a handful of Supreme Court decisions and constitutional amendments in order to think about some of the questions that the 1787 Constitution left un-answered and some of the problems that it left un-solved.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 2455H: Constitutional Debates - Honors

While we will make reference to the work of canonical political thinkers from the Western tradition during the semester--and while we will also, at times, take a broadly philosophical approach to describing certain of the Founders' theses on governance--this is not a course in "high theory". Instead, our examination of the process of drafting and ratifying the United States Constitution will be more pragmatic in nature, focusing on the practical problems and questions concerning national governance that shaped the final design of the Constitution. At the same time, this description of the class as one that addresses the Constitution in terms of the practical problems that the Founders saw it solving drastically understates the complexity and contentiousness of the subject matter that we will be examining. Specifically, the readings for the course will allow us to identify the ways in which, and reasons for which, the Founders disagreed not only on how to solve the problems of governance that the nation faced in 1787 but, moreover, on what these problems actually were. With regard to this task of understanding the principles underlying the heated debates that arose during the drafting and ratification process, it should be noted that this is not a class in Framer-worship. While we will discuss why the Federalists ultimately "won the day," we will also devote significant attention to how the Anti-Federalists both profoundly influenced how we understand constitutional democracy in the United States and provided an intellectual lineage that still informs contemporary political debate. We will, that is, give each side their due. In addition, we will conclude the semester by considering the Constitution's post-ratification history, looking at a handful of Supreme Court decisions and constitutional amendments in order to think about some of the questions that the 1787 Constitution left un-answered and some of the problems that it left un-solved.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Honors eligibility required; POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 2600: Canadian Politics and Government

Introductory survey of Canada, including constitutional development, governmental institutions, political participation, and Canadians' political attitudes and behaviors.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


POL_SC 2700: Comparative Political Systems

Analysis of major political systems selected from Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, emphasizing basic concepts of comparative political study.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 2700H: Comparative Political Systems - Honors

Analysis of major political systems selected from Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, emphasizing basic concepts of comparative political study.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100. Honors eligibility required


POL_SC 2710: Politics and the Military

Comparative study of post-cold war civil-military relations; military as an interest group, change agent, policy instrument and competitor of civilian politicians.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 2720: European Democracies

This course provides an introduction to the institutions and issues in contemporary European political systems. It covers domestic institutions and policies as well as the developments of the European Union.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


POL_SC 2800: Liberty, Justice and the Common Good

Selected great political theorists and their contemporary relevance. How to think critically about political ideas and ideologies.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


POL_SC 2860: American Political Thought

Examines major themes that shaped three centuries of American political thought, including slavery, religion, and the tension between unity and difference. Readings are drawn from primary sources (Jefferson, Adams, Mason, Tocqueville, Calhoun, Lincoln, Stowe, Baldwin) as well as contemporary analytic commentary on those sources (Bercovitch, Hartz, Wolin, Guinier, Morrison).

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: sophomore standing


POL_SC 3000: Introduction to Political Research

This course is an introduction to the systematic analysis of political phenomenon. It examines the meaning of "explanation" and "causal reasoning." and research strategies designed to make valid causal inferences. The course overview experimental design, measurement, hypothesis formulation and testing, and the display of information, using substantive examples from two or more fields of political science for illustrative purposes. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; C- or higher in STAT 1200, STAT 1300, STAT 1400, STAT 2200, or STAT 2500 or C- or higher in MATH 1300, MATH 1400, or MATH 1500


POL_SC 3164: Nation Building through a Barrel of a Gun

(same as MIL_SC 3164). This course was developed to provide students the opportunity to examine the dilemmas of military intervention, nation-building/peacekeeping operations and exit strategies. This course is designed to challenge students to think critically and arrive at their own conclusions about the use of military power to settle differences between nations, and use of military forces to conduct nation building.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 3165: "Chasing Ghost", The History of Irregular Warfare

(same as MIL_SC 3165). This course explores the history of irregular warfare from the guerrilla perspective. The course examines the works of Mau Tse-Tung, Che Guevara, T.E. Lawrence and several other guerrilla leaders. You will analyze the evolution of irregular warfare through history and understand the complexities associated with the difficulties of countering and defeating irregular warfare. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 4000: Introductory Statistics for Political Science

Basic course in applied statistics and inference using extensive examples from voting behavior, congressional behavior, international relations and public policy. Topics included nonparametric measures, probability, and rudimentary hypothesis testing; computer applications with political data using SAS. Math Reasoning Proficiency Course.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1100 or MATH 1120 or equivalent, concurrent enrollment in POL_SC 4010


POL_SC 4004: Topics in Political Science - Social Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99


POL_SC 4010: Computing Methods

Develops computer-based skills with political science data. SAS, and other packages used in mainframe and PC environments. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in POL_SC 4000


POL_SC 4030: Formal Political Analysis

Introductory course in formal mathematical models of political behavior and political institutions. Topics includes electoral rules, agenda control, measures of power, collective action, constitutions.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1100 or MATH 1120 or equivalent


POL_SC 4100: Political Parties and Election Campaigns

Development, organization, functions, activities of major and minor political parties; principles and procedures of managing campaigns; campaign finance; election administration.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 3000


POL_SC 4110: Political Behavior

Economic, psychological, and social dimensions of political behavior; participation, leadership and elites; political attitudes; voting behavior and decision-making processes.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 3000


POL_SC 4120: Politics and the Media

The role and importance of mass media in the political process, primarily the U. S. Constitutional protections of the press, politics of media control, political news and advertising, effects of information on election campaigns, political institutions, and policymaking.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4130: African-American Politics

(same as BL_STU 4130). Surveys political participation of African-Americans in American politics. Analyzes their public lives in the context of elections, behavior of political organizations, social movements, parties, and level of government.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4140: Congress and Legislative Policy

Study of national and state legislative systems and legislative policy making, with emphasis on Congress.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4150: The American Presidency

Evolution of the presidency; particular emphasis on constitutional and political roles played by chief executive in shaping public policy.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4160: Interest Groups

Development, organization, functions, activities, internal politics of special interest groups such as business, labor, agricultural and public interest groups; lobbying and techniques for influencing public policy in the American political system.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4170: Politics of the American South

This course focuses on the politics of the American South in the latter part of the 20th century and the early years of the current millennium. For undergraduate credit only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100, junior standing or instructor's consent


POL_SC 4180: Politics and Hollywood

This course examines the impact of entertainment media on politicians, the public, and politics in the United States. We will examine the worlds of film, television, and celebrity involvement in politics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 4200: The American Constitution

Leading American constitutional principles as they have evolved through important decisions of the United States Supreme Court.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100; junior standing


POL_SC 4210: Constitutional Rights

Survey of Supreme Court cases involving the Constitution's protections for life, liberty, and property and guarantee of equal protection of the law.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4220: The United States Supreme Court

Role of Supreme Court in American system of government; particular attention given to reading biographies and writings of the Justices.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4230: Constitution and Civil Liberties

Civil liberties in the American constitutional context emphasizing freedom of expression (religion, speech, press, assembly), rights of accused and right to privacy.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4310: Comparative State Politics

Analyzes similarities and differences of state politics and the ways in which such politics are shaped by political and socioeconomic environments of the states.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4320: Public Policy

Introduction to the study of public policy in the United States. Analyzes public policy choices at the national, state and local level and the variety of forces which serve to shape policy decisions.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100, and junior standing


POL_SC 4370: The Administrative State, Public Policy and Constitutional Democracy

Off in the quiet corners of the policy process, public servants distribute public benefits, write rules that have the force of law, adjudicate conflicts and selectively enforce the law. Frequently the government delegates these tasks to non-profit organizations. These public and quasi- public administrative organizations play, therefore, a critical role in the politics of who gets what, when and how - the essential question of public policy. Administrative organizations in the United States play this powerful role, however, within a constitutional democracy. This course focuses on policymaking through the administrative state and the relationship between the administrative state, democracy and the U.S. Constitution.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4380: Politics of Criminal Justice

Course explores the political motivations for and the substantive consequences of state and federal criminal justice policy in the United States.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing


POL_SC 4400: Theories of International Relations

Surveys Theories of International Relations. Analyzes conceptions of decision-making, foreign policy behavior and international society. Prerequisites: junior standing

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 4410: Politics and War

(same as PEA_ST 4410). Why do wars occur? The functions of force and uses of a threat of force. Problems of national security strategy and arms control.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


POL_SC 4411: Genocide, Terrorism and Civil War

This course explores the conditions that lead to the initiation, escalation and termination of civil wars as well as the causes and targets of terrorism and the effects of genocide.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 4412: Strategy and Warfare

Examines strategic theory, traditional forms of warfare (on land, sea, and in the air), as well as irregular warfare and terrorism. Additional topics include weapons of mass destruction, deterrence, and technology.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


POL_SC 4415: Peacekeeping and Intervention

This course will survey the causes and consequences of peacekeeping and intervention as well as assess the conditions that lead to successful and failed missions.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


POL_SC 4420: Politics of International Economic Relations

Study of reciprocal interaction between global politics and economics. Includes politics of north/south relations, multinational non-state actors, arms transfers and dependency.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


POL_SC 4430: Global Human Rights

Human rights violations are widespread. The majority of of the world's citizenry lives with inadequate civil and political and economic, social, and cultural rights, often with dire consequences on economic and human security. What caused this situation? And, moreover, what can be done to fix it? This course focuses on the social scientific study of human rights. We will focus on scientific explanations of the rise of the human rights movement, political and economic explanations for human rights conditions, and the effects of advocacy efforts concerning human rights. After this class, you will have not only an understanding of the major players and factors influencing human rights, but a base understanding of the social scientific processes which govern human rights conditions and improvements. As such, this class is not a history class or a class on current events. Though current and historical events will be discussed, your grade will not depend on your rote memorization of these events. Instead, the focus will be on understanding the underlying interests of important actors towards human rights, the arenas in which these actors interact, and the rules which govern their interactions. This focus on the basic principles will provide you with a rich practical knowledge of human rights. At the conclusion of the course, you will be able to actively engage with the global human rights community.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 4440: International Organization

Forms and functions of governmental (United Nations, European Union, NATO) and nongovernmental international organizations.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4500: The European Union in the Global System

Provides an understanding of the European Union from the perspective of international relations and comparative politics. Topics covered pertain to the institutions, politics and policies of the European Union and its member states.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and POL_SC 1400 and junior standing


POL_SC 4540: American Foreign Policies

Bases, formulation, evaluation of current American foreign policies.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


POL_SC 4600: Latin American Politics

Development, present status of political institutions in South America; emphasizes current political problems.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4605: Latin American Politics through Film

This course provides an introduction to Latin American politics using the medium of film to illustrate the complexities of political development, regime change, revolutionary movements, and problems facing new democracies such as crime, poverty, drugs, and democratic stability.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 4610: European Political Systems

Comparison of political cultures, institutions, and processes of Britain, France, West Germany, and selected smaller countries in Western Europe.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


POL_SC 4630: The Politics of Modern Europe

The course is an introduction to the politics of modern Europe. Europe provides an ideal setting to explore the central concepts and debates of comparative politics in industrialized countries. The course introduces the wide variety of political institutions, political economics and cultures existing in contemporary Europe and probes the question how such discrepancies might affect political outcomes and the possibility to coordinate EU policy. Several central topics in comparative politics, including political parties, elections, the welfare state, civil society and corruption will be introduces with application to modern European democracies. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100, Junior Standing (or instructor's consent)


POL_SC 4640: African Politics

(same as BL_STU 4640). A general comparative course focusing on post-independent Africa. Theories and concepts related to decolonization, nationalism, democratization, and ethnicity; also institutional forms and organizations: political parties, parliaments, and executives.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and junior standing


POL_SC 4660: Canada in North America

This course focuses on the role of Canada in North America. The main topic areas include the evolution of Canada as a political system; political structures and processes; regionalism and social movements; political, economic and social connections with North America; and the future of Canada in North America.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 2600


POL_SC 4670: The Political System of the European Union

This course examines the politics, political actors, and institutions of the European Union from a comparative perspective. It questions whether we can view the EU as a federal democratic system similar to the U.S.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and Junior or Senior standing or consent of instructor


POL_SC 4680: Chinese Politics and Foreign Policy

This course is intended to introduce you to the history and analysis of Chinese politics and foreign policy since 1949. The course has two main goals. The first is that during the semester, you should learn the key historical events in Chinese political development and foreign policy. Second, you will examine these events and developments in light of major theories in comparative politics and international relations.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and POL_SC 1400 or Instructor's permission


POL_SC 4710: Terrorism: Religious, Ethnic and Ideological Politics

Terrorism as political violence extending beyond the acts themselves. Examines major modern movements, e.g. Northern Ireland, Basques (Spain), Germany, Algeria, Arab-Israeli, Iran, India, Sri Lanka, Peru, Argentina, Uruguay.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


POL_SC 4720: Politics of Development

(same as BL_STU 4720). Comparative, interdisciplinary analysis of the politics of developing countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Special attention given to the problems of political and socioeconomic development.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


POL_SC 4730: Women and Politics

(same as WGST 4730). This course examines women's political participation and public policies towards women in countries around the world.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100; junior standing


POL_SC 4740: Comparative Political Culture

Review of the many divergent conceptions of political culture and examination of the dynamics and consequences for the performance of political systems and the behavior of their citizenry. Comparison of particular cultures of selected regions including East Asia, Europe and the Middle East, Latin America, and North America.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


POL_SC 4750: Power and Money

This course provides an introduction to comparative political economy by focusing on the following questions. How and why do governments promote economic prosperity? Does democracy make people richer or poorer? Is it true that "money is power"? Can poor countries enjoy a stable democracy?

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing


POL_SC 4760: Comparative Political Parties

This course will explore political parties and party systems in democracies around the world. The course will focus on differences in the number, size, ideology, polarization, and functions of political parties.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 2700 and Junior standing or consent of instructor


POL_SC 4770: Comparative Political Behavior

Explores research questions related to cross-national differences and similarities in public opinion formation, political culture and values, voting behavior, and other forms of political participation. Violent forms of political participation are also considered. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Junior Standing and POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 4780: Dictatorship and Democracy

Why did the Arab Spring happen? Will China survive or collapse? Did North Korea's new dictator Kim Jong Un really execute his old girlfriend? Throughout history, the majority of the world's regimes have been dictatorships rather than democracies. This course is an introduction to the causes and character of contemporary authoritarian and democratic regimes: how and why they are created, why they survive, why people resist dictatorship or don't, and why regimes survive or fall. We will use academic articles, news stories, and films to study dictatorship and democracy. You will come away from this course with an understanding of the major theoretical debates about dictatorship and democracy, and how these debates apply to important countries and issues in the world today.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 4800: Classical Political Theory

(same as CL_HUM 4800). Great Greek, Roman, and Medieval political theorists on the relation of psychology, ethics, politics, and the best form of government.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


POL_SC 4810: Modern Political Theory

Great political theorists from Machiavelli through Marx on the nation state, capitalism, liberalism, conservatism, and Marxism.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


POL_SC 4820: Contemporary Political Theory

Great contemporary thinkers on Western vs. Eastern Marxism, existentialism, critical theory, political theologies, postmodernism, feminism, environmentalist ideologies, biological approaches to politics.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


POL_SC 4830: Democracy in America (and Elsewhere)

This course focuses on the dynamics of democracy. We will explore various topics in the history, development, and practice of democracy through an examination of the writings of Alexis de Tocqueville, one of the most insightful and prescient observers of American political culture.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100 and Junior standing


POL_SC 4840: Developing Dynamics of Democracy

This course examines developments in the theory and practice of democracy from the ancient Greeks to the present. Beginning with the origins of democracy in the Hellenic city states, we consider the transformation of democratic concepts in the classical liberal period, review the development of democratic institutions in the United States and Europe, examine the emergence of supra-national democratic institutions such as the European Union, and assess the future of democratization in the 21st century.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 4850: Scots and the Making of America

This class is on the influence of the Scottish Enlightenment on the founding of the United States. The Scottish Enlightenment refers to uniquely Scottish advances in social, political, scientific and literary thought that transpired in the 18th and early 19th centuries. This line of thought, especially in its social and political dimensions, was especially influential in shaping the founding of the United States.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100


POL_SC 4850H: Scots and the Making of America - Honors

This class is on the influence of the Scottish Enlightenment on the founding of the United States. The Scottish Enlightenment refers to uniquely Scottish advances in social, political, scientific and literary thought that transpired in the 18th and early 19th centuries. This line of thought, especially in its social and political dimensions, was especially influential in shaping the founding of the United States.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 1100, Honors eligibility required


POL_SC 4890: Contemporary Political Analysis

This course introduces public choice writings. Public choice applies economic methods to the study of politics. Topics covered include the appropriate size of the state, how individuals organize to achieve shared goals and how voters chose in elections.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: junior standing or instructor's consent


POL_SC 4900: Beltway History and Politics: American Constitutional Democracy in Theory and Practice

(same as HIST 4900). This course is an experiential overview of American political history for students on the Kinder Forum's Washington program, showing how American constitutional democracy was developed and implemented right here on the Potomac, as much as possible in the actual places where the events occurred. Emphasis will be placed on interplay between constitutional theory and actual political experience over time, and the tensions and institutional changes that emerged as Americans and their government coped with cataclysmic social changes, unparalleled economic development, and fearsome international challenges.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: This course is limited to students participating in the Kinder Scholars Washington D.C. Internship program


POL_SC 4940: Political Science Internship

Work experience in a public or private organization that is relevant to the political science major coordinated by a faculty member.

Credit Hour: 3-6
Prerequisites: junior standing with a 3.0 GPA; or senior standing with 2.67 GPA. Must be in good standing


POL_SC 4985: Problems in Political Science

Independent investigation to meet needs of the individual student.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


POL_SC 4986: Special Readings in Political Science

Independent readings selected in consultation with supervisory faculty member.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


POL_SC 4995: Political Science Capstone

Readings and discussions in selected areas of political science (comparative, American, international affairs, public administration/policy or theory). Subject depends on instructor.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: political science major, senior standing


POL_SC 4996: Political Science Capstone, Honors

Special readings, reports in the several fields of political science. For political science Honors students.

Credit Hour: 1-6
Prerequisites: senior standing. Honors eligibility required


POL_SC 7000: Introductory Statistics for Political Science

Basic course in applied statistics and inference using extensive examples from voting behavior, congressional behavior, international relations and public policy. Topics included nonparametric measures, probability, and rudimentary hypothesis testing; computer applications with political data using SAS.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH 1100 or MATH 1120 or equivalent
Corequisites: POL_SC 4010


POL_SC 7010: Computing Methods

Develops computer-based skills with political science data. SAS, and other packages used in mainframe and PC environments. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1
Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in POL_SC 4000


POL_SC 7085: Problems in Political Science

Individual study in one of the fields of Political Science.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


POL_SC 8085: Master Research in Political Science

Independent research not leading to a thesis. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-99
Prerequisites: instructor's consent


POL_SC 8090: Masters Research in Political Science

Independent research leading to thesis. Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-99


POL_SC 9000: Scope and Methods

Examines the major fields in the discipline, assumptions underlying empirical social science and theoretical issues in the study of politics. Primarily for doctoral candidates in political science.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9030: Linear Models in Politics

Linear and non-linear multivariate estimation techniques with applications to political science research.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9040: Advanced Political Methodology

Analytic strategies and statistical models applicable to social science research. Emphasis on modeling political phenomena. Topics vary, include linear and nonlinear models, multidimensional scaling.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9050: Introduction to Formal Political Theory

Formal and mathematical models of political institutions and behavior. Topics may include social choice, game theory, spatial models, coalition formation.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9070: Qualitative Research Methods in Political Science

Seminar on research design for qualitative research in political science. Topics include case-study, archival, multi-method, and field research and other qualitative methods.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9085: Problems in Political Science

For graduate students with necessary prerequisite courses. Topics in one of the fields of political science for individual study.

Credit Hour: 1-99


POL_SC 9090: Ph D Research in Political Science

Independent research leading to thesis. Graded on a S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-99


POL_SC 9100: American Political Behavior

Critical examination of literature on political behavior in the United States. Topics include voting and elections, public opinion, parties and interest groups, political psychology, communication, elites, and collective action.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9120: Voting and Elections

Research seminar on political participation, voter choice, campaigns, and elections, primarily in the United States. Covers theories, approaches and research on electoral behavior.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9140: American Political Institutions

Critical examination of literature on political institutions in the United States. Topics include Congress, the Presidency, courts, the bureaucracy, political organizations, federalism, and institutional dynamics.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9145: American State Politics

Research seminar on state government and politics in the U.S. Topics include state culture, mass politics, elections, state executives, legislatures, courts, and public policy.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9150: Political Parties

Research seminar on the organization and activities of political parties, primarily in the United States. Attention to historical development, nature of party change, functions, elites, membership, political finance, and policy formulation.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9160: Interest Groups

Research seminar on nonpartisan organizations seeking to influence the public policy agenda. Includes problems of collective action, mobilization and organization of interest groups, strategies and tactics, lobbying, political movements, theories and research.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9170: Legislative Institutions

Research seminar on the U.S. Congress and legislative institutions generally. Topics include the legislative process, policy change, committees, political parties, leadership, representation, and relations with other branches of government.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9175: Evolution of American Legislatures, 1619 to the Present

Examination of the organizational evolution of American legislatures from the colonial era to the present.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9190: Research in American Politics

Directed research into one or more specific aspects of American Politics, behavior, and institutions.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9210: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Research seminar on the U.S. Constitution, civil liberties, and civil rights. Topics include the First Amendment and freedom of expression and of belief, due process, the rights of the accused, privacy, equal protection, and constitutional interpretation. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9220: Constitutional Law: Institutions and Powers

Research seminar on powers and constraints on government found in the U.S. Constitution. Topics include separation of powers, federalism, legislative and presidential power, the commerce clause, taxing and spending.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9230: Public Law

Research seminar on the judicial process in the United States.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9240: Racial and Ethnic Politics

Theories, institutional processes, and behaviors pertaining to social defined racial and ethnic groups. Topics include social dominance, representation, mobilization, public opinion, and the influence of racial and ethnic factors on the American political process.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9300: Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations

Analyzes relationships among American governmental units emphasizing national-state relations and metropolitan area problems.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9310: Public Policy

Covers the basic theory, approaches, problems and issues relating to the scope, development and implementation of public policy.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9320: Administrative Politics

Critical examination of literature relating to selected topics in public bureaucracies.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9330: Research in Policy and Administration

Contemporary research in public policy, bureaucratic politics, public management and administration.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9350: Public Policy, Processes and Strategies

Provides an overview of the history, function, size, scope, development, and management of the nonprofit sector. Historical, political, economic, and social perspectives are used to examine the meaning of voluntarism, charity, philanthropy, and the nonprofit sector. Graded on A-F basis.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9390: Administration and Public Policy

Directed research in Public Administration or Public Policy. Inquire as to the emphasis for any given semester.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9400: Introduction to International Relations

Analysis, evaluation of some basic theories which attempt to explain international affairs.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9420: Quantitative Approaches in International Relations

Research seminar emphasizing quantitative analysis of large data sets on international politics, especially international conflict. Topics include conflict escalation, correlates of war, deterrence, alliance behavior and the democratic peace.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9430: International Political Economy

Theories of political economy and current problems such as North-South relations, international trade, monetary relations, aid regimes, and international divisions of labor.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9440: Foreign Policy Analysis

Research seminar assessing foreign policy decisions and outcomes with particular attention given to decision-making. Both theoretical and empirical methods for testing foreign policy are considered. Approaches include domestic politics, bureaucratic, and psychological models.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9450: International Conflict

This is an advanced seminar in international conflict. The range of material that might be included is vast, so an effort will be made to balance overall coverage with the need to look in more depth at some especially salient areas in the literature. The seminar unfolds in five parts.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9460: Coercive Diplomacy

Research seminar on how nations apply political and economic sanctions on other nations in order to compel or entice changes in foreign policy and/or government behavior. How threats (short of conflict) and incentives govern international relations.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9470: Theories of Civil War

Seminar on why groups may engage in violence against the state or other opposition groups. Topics include causes of civil wars, terrorism as a strategy of violence and possible solutions including third part security, partition, intervention, power sharing and treaty design. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9480: Human Security

Seminar on cross-national civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights. The determinants of human security issues and the efficacy and dynamics of efforts from intergovernmental organizations, foreign aid, peacekeeping, interventions, and treaties on human rights.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9490: Selected Themes in International Relations

Intensive study of foreign policy formulation and implementation; special emphasis on American foreign policies.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9600: Introduction to Comparative Politics

Study of theories and approaches to comparative politics in Europe, Asia and/or Latin America.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9610: Latin American Politics

Research seminar on politics and government in Central and South America. Topics include modernization and dependency theories, civil-military relations, economics adjustment, democratic transitions, and area and country studies.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9620: Politics of Industrial Societies

Comparative analysis of public policy in Western democracies. Emphasis on economic policy and related policy areas. Comparisons of Western European countries with United States, Japan, Russia when appropriate.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: graduate standing


POL_SC 9640: East Asian Politics

Intensive study of selected topics in the internal and external politics of China, Japan and Korea.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9645: China and Political Science Research

This is a graduate-level seminar on Chinese politics and foreign policy since 1949 covering the key historical events in Chinese political development and foreign policy. These events and developments will be examined in light of major theories in and methodological approaches adopted by the subfields of comparative politics and international relations, with the goal of exploring the strengths and weaknesses of alternative perspectives. At the end of the course, students should be familiar with the key debates and questions in the study of Chinese politics and foreign policy, and have a better sense of how to research questions on these topics. The course is also intended to encourage a dialogue between the study of China and the broader fields of comparative politics and international relations. Thus by the end of the course, students should have a sense not only for how the study of Chinese politics and foreign policy applies broader CP/IR theories to explain key patterns and events in China, but also gain insight into the question of what China as a case (or cases) can contribute back to major theories and debates in these fields.

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: POL_SC 9600


POL_SC 9650: African Politics

Research seminar on comparative African politics. Theory and research on sub-Saharan post-independence governance on the African continent.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9670: European Transitions

Research seminar comparing post-communist transitions with those from previous European transformations along economic, political, and social lines. The course focuses on testing theories and on comparing transitional experiences in search of generalizable results.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9680: Politics of Development

Research seminar on the politics of development in the developing world. Examines the relationship between political and economic change in Africa, Asia and Latin America, as well as global patterns.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9690: Democracy and Dictatorship

Research seminar on comparative politics of authoritarian and democratic regimes. Topics include characteristics and durability of authoritarianism, political institutions under autocracy, tactics of rule, state-society relations, transition and breakdown of regimes.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9700: Democratization

Research seminar on the third wave of democratization. Classical and contemporary conceptions of democracy, measurement, theories, trends, and influences on democratization across the globe.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9710: Comparative Political Economy

Interdisciplinary, comparative analysis of political aspects of political economy, rural development, and related issues.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9720: Comparative Political Institutions

Research seminar on comparative political institutions. Debates in comparative politics on the influence of rules and institutions on political decisions in developed democracies. Topics include political parties, legislatures, governments, and electoral rules.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9760: Comparative Political Parties

This course will analyze cross-national differences in the size and nature of party systems in established democracies. Graded on A-F basis only.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9790: Seminar in Comparative Politics

Comparative study of selected aspects of political systems. Variable content. May be repeated for credit.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9901: Topics in Political Science

Organized study of selected topics. Subjects and earnable credit vary from semester to semester.

Credit Hour: 1-99


POL_SC 9910: Leadership in Civic Education

Intensive workshop for Missouri secondary social studies teachers. Includes instructional materials on U.S. and Missouri governments, lectures by leading scholars, breakout sessions, and interactions with government practitioners.

Credit Hours: 3


POL_SC 9970: Independent Readings for Ph.D. Comprehensive Examinations

Graded on S/U basis only.

Credit Hour: 1-9